Special Issue "Synthesis, Modeling, Characterization and Applications of Metal-Organic Frameworks"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 June 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Diego A. Gómez-Gualdrón

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanoporous crystals; molecular modeling; catalysis; separations, storage
Guest Editor
Dr. Yamil J. Colón

1. Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, United States;
2. Institute for Molecular Engineering and Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, Illinois 60439, United States
Website | E-Mail
Interests: porous materials; molecular simulation; storage; self-assembly; water

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to exceptional tunability, and outstanding chemical and physical properties, metal-organic framework (MOF) crystals have captured the imagination of the research community for applications in diverse areas, such as gas storage, drug delivery, sensing, catalysis, separations, and photovoltaics. The study of MOFs has been intense and significant progress has taken place toward the rational design of these materials. Prediction of MOF properties before synthesis has become more accurate, increasingly sophisticated structures have become synthetically accessible, synthesized structures have been characterized more thoroughly, and potential applications continue to increase, with commercial applications starting to emerge. These exciting developments have motivated this Special Issue.

The Special Issue on “Synthesis, Modeling, Characterization, and Application of Metal-Organic Frameworks” is intended to provide a unique international forum aimed at covering a broad description of experimental and simulation results demonstrating: successful and innovative applications of MOFs, elucidation of the structure of MOFs across different scales, rational design and control of MOF structure during synthesis, accurate prediction of MOF properties using computational methods, and discovery of fundamental connections between MOF structure and properties. Scientists working in a wide range of disciplines are invited to contribute to this cause.

The topics summarized under the keywords broadly cover examples of the greater number of sub-topics in mind.

Prof. Dr. Diego A. Gómez-Gualdrón
Dr. Yamil J. Colón
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • MOF novel structures
  • MOF simulation
  • MOF characterization
  • MOF-hybrid materials
  • MOF self-assembly
  • MOF rational design

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Fabrication of Novel ZIF-8@BiVO4 Composite with Enhanced Photocatalytic Performance
Crystals 2018, 8(11), 432; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8110432 (registering DOI)
Received: 26 September 2018 / Revised: 6 November 2018 / Accepted: 16 November 2018 / Published: 19 November 2018
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Abstract
In this work, a novel metal-organic framework (MOF) and BiVO4 (BVO) composite photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by an in-situ growth method. The characterization of obtained samples was done by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, and photoluminescence
[...] Read more.
In this work, a novel metal-organic framework (MOF) and BiVO4 (BVO) composite photocatalyst was successfully synthesized by an in-situ growth method. The characterization of obtained samples was done by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, N2 adsorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photocatalytic performance of ZIF-8@BiVO4 composite was evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under simulated visible light irradiation. Compared with the mixture of BVO and ZIF-8, the composite photocatalyst exhibited superior photodegradation efficiency, which could be attributed to the synergistic effect between BVO and ZIF-8. The reduced recombination of photogenerated electrons and holes was considered to be an important reason for the enhancement of photocatalytic performance. This design demonstrates a rational method to improve the photocatalytic performance by combining photocatalysts with MOFs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Magnetic MOF for AO7 Removal and Targeted Delivery
Crystals 2018, 8(6), 250; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8060250
Received: 25 May 2018 / Revised: 6 June 2018 / Accepted: 13 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
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Abstract
Owing to their high surface area and porosity, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been gradually employed for a myriad of applications ranging from sensing, pollutant adsorption, and drug delivery to environmental remediation and catalysis. Magnetic nanoparticles-metal-organic frameworks (MMOFs) hybrid materials can facilitate facile removal
[...] Read more.
Owing to their high surface area and porosity, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been gradually employed for a myriad of applications ranging from sensing, pollutant adsorption, and drug delivery to environmental remediation and catalysis. Magnetic nanoparticles-metal-organic frameworks (MMOFs) hybrid materials can facilitate facile removal of MOFs from solutions. In this report, we report the synthesis of Fe3O4@UiO-66 by encapsulation and simulated the drug loading and release by studying the adsorption and release of AO7. Thus, we loaded these MMOFs with AO7 and found that they were able to trigger and control its release by simply applying an external magnetic field. The magnetic field heats the magnets in the MOF, which causes the load to burst from the framework. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Coordination Behavior of Bis-Imidazole and Various Carboxylate Ligands towards Zn(II) and Cd(II) Ions: Synthesis, Structure, and Photoluminescence Study
Crystals 2018, 8(6), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8060236
Received: 3 May 2018 / Revised: 24 May 2018 / Accepted: 24 May 2018 / Published: 25 May 2018
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Abstract
Four coordination polymers (CPs) based on bis-imidazole ligands (1,2-bimb and 1,2-bmimb), namely, {[Zn(1,2-bimb)(2,5-dtpa)] H2O}n (1), {[Cd2(1,2-bimb)2(5-hipa)2] 2H2O} (2), {Zn2(1,2-bimb)(L)(CH3COO) DMF·2H2O}n (
[...] Read more.
Four coordination polymers (CPs) based on bis-imidazole ligands (1,2-bimb and 1,2-bmimb), namely, {[Zn(1,2-bimb)(2,5-dtpa)] H2O}n (1), {[Cd2(1,2-bimb)2(5-hipa)2] 2H2O} (2), {Zn2(1,2-bimb)(L)(CH3COO) DMF·2H2O}n (3) and {Cd(1,2-bmimb)(3-npa)}n (4), have been synthesized by solvothermal reactions (1,2-bimb = 1,2-bis((1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene, 1,2-bmimb = 1,2-bis((2-methyl-1H-imidazol-1-yl)methyl)benzene, 2,5-H2dtpa = 2,5-diaminoterephthalic acid, 5-H2hipa = 5-hydroxyisophthalic acid, H3L= 3,3′,3′′-(2,4,6-trioxo-1,3,5-triazinane-1,3,5-triyl)tripropanoic acid, 3-H2npa = 3-nitrophthalic acid) and structurally verified by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses and further characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), elemental analyses and infrared spectroscopy (IR). Complex 1 and 2 show a dinuclear 2D layered structure. Complex 4 exhibits a two-dimensional network consisting of [Cd(3-npa)]n and [Cd(1,2-bmimb)]n chains. Both 1,2 and 4 display a 4-connected sql topology sheet, which can be further expanded into a 3D supramolecular network through π···π interaction between layers. Complex 3 features a 3D (3,6)-connected {42·6}·{44·610·8}-3,6T24 topology structure consisting of 2D bilayers. Structural comparison reveals that it is not only the substituents at different positions of ancillary ligands and the primary bis(imidazole) linkers that play crucial roles in the control of the final structures. Besides, the photoluminescence properties of 14 have been investigated in the solid state at room temperature. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Metal–Organic Framework Hybrid Materials and Their Applications
Crystals 2018, 8(8), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8080325
Received: 24 July 2018 / Revised: 8 August 2018 / Accepted: 10 August 2018 / Published: 14 August 2018
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Abstract
The inherent porous nature and facile tunability of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) make them ideal candidates for use in multiple fields. MOF hybrid materials are derived from existing MOFs hybridized with other materials or small molecules using a variety of techniques. This led to
[...] Read more.
The inherent porous nature and facile tunability of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) make them ideal candidates for use in multiple fields. MOF hybrid materials are derived from existing MOFs hybridized with other materials or small molecules using a variety of techniques. This led to superior performance of the new materials by combining the advantages of MOF components and others. In this review, we discuss several hybridization methods for the preparation of various MOF hybrids with representative examples from the literature. These methods include covalent modifications, noncovalent modifications, and using MOFs as templates or precursors. We also review the applications of the MOF hybrids in the fields of catalysis, drug delivery, gas storage and separation, energy storage, sensing, and others. Full article
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