Special Issue "Recent Advances in Polyoxometalate-Catalyzed Reactions"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Haralampos N. Miras

School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: self-assembly; polyoxometalates; chalcogenides; supramolecular clusters; functional molecular materials; heterogeneous catalysis; energy storage
Guest Editor
Prof. Yu-Fei Song

State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029, China
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Molecular metal oxides, or polyoxometalates (POMs), are an extraordinary class of inorganic molecules that has attracted the attention of research groups over the years, due to their vast range of structures, with applications ranging from catalysis and medicine to molecular electronics, magnetism, and energy.

More specifically, the diverse nature of POMs makes them attractive candidates for numerous homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic processes. Their diverse range of physical properties, such as acidity, solubility, charge density, redox activity, in addition to their ability to store electrons reversibly under marginal structural rearrangements, are all properties of vital importance for applications in catalysis which can be synthetically controlled. Most importantly, POM-based catalysts can be designed at atomic/molecular level, are excellent models for the investigation of the catalytic performance and functionality of metal oxide materials. Finally, POMs allow the investigation of catalytic processes at atomic/molecular level while they can stabilize selectively reaction intermediates.

Even though, POMs have been used in several industrial processes since the 1970s, they are still the subject of ongoing research in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis leading to the emergence of new applications while their abundance, stability and recyclability contributes to lowering the overall operating cost.

In this Special Issue, we have endeavoured to cover the latest research and trends in the wide field of POM catalysis. In doing so we placed specific emphasis on the emerging areas, material design and technological methodologies that are leading to improvements in catalytic processes.

Dr. Haralampos N. Miras
Prof. Yu-Fei Song
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • homogeneous catalysis
  • heterogeneous catalysis
  • polyoxometalates
  • catalytic oxidation
  • photocatalysis
  • water splitting
  • sulfoxidation
  • epoxidation
  • desulfurization
  • composite materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Selective Alkylation of Benzene by Propane over Bifunctional Pd-Acid Catalysts
Catalysts 2017, 7(8), 233; doi:10.3390/catal7080233
Received: 12 July 2017 / Revised: 4 August 2017 / Accepted: 8 August 2017 / Published: 11 August 2017
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Abstract
The alkylation of benzene by propane to yield isopropylbenzene (iPrPh) was studied using bifunctional Pd-acid catalysts, such as Pd-heteropoly acid and Pd-zeolite, in a fixed bed reactor at 300 °C and 1 bar pressure. Keggin-type tungstosilicic acid H4SiW12O40
[...] Read more.
The alkylation of benzene by propane to yield isopropylbenzene (iPrPh) was studied using bifunctional Pd-acid catalysts, such as Pd-heteropoly acid and Pd-zeolite, in a fixed bed reactor at 300 °C and 1 bar pressure. Keggin-type tungstosilicic acid H4SiW12O40 (HSiW) and zeolite HZSM-5 were used as the acid components in these catalysts. The reaction occurred most efficiently over 2%Pd/25%HSiW/SiO2, giving iPrPh with up to 88% selectivity. The Pd-HSiW catalyst was more selective than the Pd-HZSM-5; the latter gave only 11–18% iPrPh selectivity. The reaction proceeded via a bifunctional mechanism including the dehydrogenation of propane to form propene on Pd sites, followed by the alkylation of benzene with the propene on acid sites. The effect of Pd loading in Pd-HSiW and Pd-HZSM-5 catalysts indicated that the first step reached quasi-equilibrium at 1.5–2% Pd loading and the second step became rate limiting. The addition of gold to Pd-HSiW enhanced the activity of this catalyst, although the Au-HSiW without Pd was inert. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Polyoxometalate-Catalyzed Reactions)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Polyoxometalate (POM)-Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) Composite Materials: Design and Catalytic Applications
Catalysts 2017, 7(9), 260; doi:10.3390/catal7090260
Received: 9 August 2017 / Revised: 23 August 2017 / Accepted: 24 August 2017 / Published: 1 September 2017
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Abstract
Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are an important large class of two-dimensional (2D) anionic lamellar materials that possess flexible modular structure, facile exchangeability of inter-lamellar guest anions and uniform distribution of metal cations in the layer. Owing to the modular accessible gallery and unique
[...] Read more.
Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) are an important large class of two-dimensional (2D) anionic lamellar materials that possess flexible modular structure, facile exchangeability of inter-lamellar guest anions and uniform distribution of metal cations in the layer. Owing to the modular accessible gallery and unique inter-lamellar chemical environment, polyoxometalates (POMs) intercalated with LDHs has shown a vast array of physical properties with applications in environment, energy, catalysis, etc. Here we describe how polyoxometalate clusters can be used as building components for the construction of systems with important catalytic properties. This review article mainly focuses on the discussion of new synthetic approaches developed recently that allow the incorporation of the element of design in the construction of a fundamentally new class of materials with pre-defined functionalities in catalytic applications. Introducing the element of design and taking control over the finally observed functionality we demonstrate the unique opportunity for engineering materials with modular properties for specific catalytic applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Polyoxometalate-Catalyzed Reactions)
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