Special Issue "Carbon-Based Materials for Electrical Power Transmission and Smart Grid Technologies"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Alvin Orbaek White

Energy Safety Research Institute, Swansea University, Bay Campus, Swansea SA1 8EN, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: carbon nanotube synthesis; applications and characterization; electron microscopy of carbon nanotubes; electrochemistry in organic synthesis; electro organic synthetic chemistry; catalysis and catalytic nanoparticles; nano medicine; aerospace and deep space applications; science education using nano materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Electricity is the underlying driver for all modern living standards, when the electrical grid is overwhelmed and electricity is lost then modern society grinds to a standstill. The current electrical grid is due for a systems overhaul; the smart grid system is designed to replace the current antiquated electrical grid. Carbon based materials for power transmission, storage, and energy conversion offer unique opportunity for application in the smart grid of the future. Example materials of interest include, but are not limited to carbon nanotubes (single wall and multi wall), graphene, graphene nanoribbons, conducting polymers, and organic semiconductors. These materials have been shown to effectively work in many pertinent applications such as transistors, conductors, semi-conductors, displays, capacitors, batteries and much more. The aim of this Special Issue is to present solutions to global energy demands using carbon-based materials within the smart grid system, whereby key technical components are improved or replaced by carbon based materials. In this special issue the richness of carbon based materials for electrical applications will be made evident and will serve as a blueprint for adoption within the smart grid of the future.

Dr. Alvin Orbaek White
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • smart grid
  • power transmission
  • carbon electronics
  • carbon nanotube
  • graphene
  • graphene nanoribbons
  • conducting polymers
  • organic semiconductors

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Apparatus for Scalable Functionalization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes via the Billups-Birch Reduction
C 2017, 3(2), 19; doi:10.3390/c3020019
Received: 25 May 2017 / Revised: 13 June 2017 / Accepted: 14 June 2017 / Published: 17 June 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3872 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A prototype design of a reactor for scalable functionalization of SWCNTs by the reaction of alkyl halides with Billups-Birch reduced SWCNTs is described. The Hauge apparatus is designed to allow for the safe handling of all the reagents and products under an inert
[...] Read more.
A prototype design of a reactor for scalable functionalization of SWCNTs by the reaction of alkyl halides with Billups-Birch reduced SWCNTs is described. The Hauge apparatus is designed to allow for the safe handling of all the reagents and products under an inert atmosphere at controlled temperatures. The extent of reaction of Li/NH3 solution with the SWCNTs is measured in-situ by solution conduction, while homogenous mixing is ensured by the use of a homogenizer, and thermocouple are placed at different heights within the reactor flask. Addition of an alkyl halide yield alkyl-functionalized SWCNTs, which may be isolated by solvent extraction leaving a solid sample that is readily purified by hydrocarbon extraction. As an example, reaction of SWCNT/Li/NH3 with 1-iododecane yields dodecane-functionalized SWCNTs (C12-SWCNTs), which have been characterized by TG/DTA, XPS, and Raman spectroscopy. Sample extraction during the reaction allows for probing of the rate of the reaction in order to determine the end point of the reaction, which for C12-SWCNTs (at −78 °C) is 30 min. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle Catalyst Residue and Oxygen Species Inhibition of the Formation of Hexahapto-Metal Complexes of Group 6 Metals on Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes
C 2017, 3(2), 17; doi:10.3390/c3020017
Received: 16 April 2017 / Revised: 10 May 2017 / Accepted: 16 May 2017 / Published: 26 May 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (6498 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The reaction of Group 6 metals with SWCNT has the potential to bridge the resistive SWCNTSWCNT junctions by the formation of “Cr(SWCNT)2” complexes analogous to Cr(C6H6)2. This study reports that the formation of
[...] Read more.
The reaction of Group 6 metals with SWCNT has the potential to bridge the resistive SWCNTSWCNT junctions by the formation of “Cr(SWCNT)2” complexes analogous to Cr(C6H6)2. This study reports that the formation of such species is very sensitive to oxidation by a residual iron oxide catalyst used for the growth of the SWCNTs and adsorbed/bound oxygen functionality. The reaction of raw HiPco SWCNTs with M(CO)6 and (C7H8)M(CO)3 (M = Cr, W) or (C6H6)Cr(CO)3 results in the formation of the Group 6 metal oxides. Annealing and acid treating the HiPco SWCNTs to reduce the catalyst content allows for the observation of zero valent metals by XPS, while the use of very high purity SWCNTs and graphene allows for the addition of primarily zero valent Group 6 metals, including the bis-hexahapto metal complex. Full article
Figures

Back to Top