Special Issue "Recent Advances in SWBLI Research"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Hossein Zare-Behtash

Aerospace Sciences Division, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Fluid-Structure Interactions, Flow and Flight Control, Advanced Flow Diagnostics, Shock-Vortex Interactions, Non-planar wing planforms, Compressible Flows, Unsteady Aerodynamics, Wind Tunnel Testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The necessity of traveling faster, whether it concerns travel from country to country, access to space, interplanetary travel, or merely the reduction of environmental impacts (within the aerospace industry), has brought us face to face with a fundamental and unsteady fluid dynamic phenomenon: namely, the Shock Wave–Boundary Layer Interaction (SWBLI) phenomenon. Uncontrolled, SWBLIs can lead to regions of high thermal gradient, structural fatigue and vibrations, fluid–thermal–structure interactions, and losses in propulsive efficiency in transonic and hypersonic vehicles.

Various specialist groups around the world have dedicated many years and extensive numerical and experimental resources to understanding SWBLI, with the ultimate goal of controlling and mitigating its adverse effects. Thus, the phenomenon of SWBLI is a challenging and exciting topic. This drive to understand has produced many advances in our numerical and experimental capabilities within fluid dynamics. These innovations motivate this Special Issue.

We invite papers addressing both the advances in our fundamental understanding of the SWBLI phenomena and also the latest in the numerical and experimental tools and techniques that are currently being utilized for this purpose.

Dr. Hossein Zare-Behtash
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Shock Wave Attenuation Using Foam Obstacles: Does Geometry Matter?
Aerospace 2015, 2(2), 353-375; doi:10.3390/aerospace2020353
Received: 9 February 2015 / Revised: 5 June 2015 / Accepted: 8 June 2015 / Published: 15 June 2015
PDF Full-text (13342 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A shock wave impact study on open and closed cell foam obstacles was completed to assess attenuation effects with respect to different front face geometries of the foam obstacles. Five different types of geometries were investigated, while keeping the mass of the foam
[...] Read more.
A shock wave impact study on open and closed cell foam obstacles was completed to assess attenuation effects with respect to different front face geometries of the foam obstacles. Five different types of geometries were investigated, while keeping the mass of the foam obstacle constant. The front face, i.e., the side where the incident shock wave impacts, were cut in geometries with one, two, three or four convergent shapes, and the results were compared to a foam block with a flat front face. Results were obtained by pressure sensors located upstream and downstream of the foam obstacle, in addition to high-speed schlieren photography. Results from the experiments show no significant difference between the five geometries, nor the two types of foam. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in SWBLI Research)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Supersonic Flow Control Using Combined Energy Deposition
Aerospace 2015, 2(1), 118-134; doi:10.3390/aerospace2010118
Received: 29 January 2015 / Revised: 6 March 2015 / Accepted: 13 March 2015 / Published: 18 March 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (21907 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Drag force control via energy deposition in an oncoming flow is a wide area of interest in aerospace sciences. Recently, investigations on the effect of combining energy sources have been conducted. The possibility of coupling microwave (MW) discharges or MW and laser energy
[...] Read more.
Drag force control via energy deposition in an oncoming flow is a wide area of interest in aerospace sciences. Recently, investigations on the effect of combining energy sources have been conducted. The possibility of coupling microwave (MW) discharges or MW and laser energy deposition is discussed. In the present work, the flow details accompanying the interaction of a combined energy release and an aerodynamic body in a supersonic flow are considered numerically on the base of the Euler equations. Comparison with non-combined energy deposition is analyzed. The effect of introducing the internal part to the energy release on the drag force reduction is examined. The flows for blunt cylinder, hemisphere-cylinder and pointed body are considered for a wide class of the combined energy source characteristics. Freestream Mach number is varied from 1.89 to 3.45. Complicated unsteady vortex structures caused by the Richtmyer–Meshkov instabilities are shown to be the reason for the reduction in drag. The unsteady double vortex mechanism of the frontal drag force reduction and mechanism of the constantly acting vortices at the steady flow are described. Suppression of shear layer instability and large scaled flow pulsations as the result of the combined energy release effect is established. Complex conservative difference schemes are used in the simulations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in SWBLI Research)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Shock Wave Diffraction Phenomena around Slotted Splitters
Aerospace 2015, 2(1), 1-16; doi:10.3390/aerospace2010001
Received: 14 November 2014 / Accepted: 17 December 2014 / Published: 5 January 2015
PDF Full-text (4200 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In the field of aerospace engineering, the study of the characteristics of vortical flows and their unsteady phenomena finds numerous engineering applications related to improvements in the design of tip devices, enhancement of combustor performance, and control of noise generation. A large amount
[...] Read more.
In the field of aerospace engineering, the study of the characteristics of vortical flows and their unsteady phenomena finds numerous engineering applications related to improvements in the design of tip devices, enhancement of combustor performance, and control of noise generation. A large amount of work has been carried out in the analysis of the shock wave diffraction around conventional geometries such as sharp and rounded corners, but the employment of splitters with lateral variation has hardly attracted the attention of researchers. The investigation of this phenomenon around two-dimensional wedges has allowed the understanding of the basic physical principles of the flow features. On the other hand, important aspects that appear in the third dimension due to the turbulent nature of the vortices are omitted. The lack of studies that use three-dimensional geometries has motivated the current work to experimentally investigate the evolution of the shock wave diffraction around two splitters with spike-shaped structures for Mach numbers of 1.31 and 1.59. Schlieren photography was used to obtain an insight into the sequential diffraction processes that take place in different planes. Interacting among them, these phenomena generate a complicated turbulent cloud with a vortical arrangement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in SWBLI Research)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Turbulence Modeling of Flows with Extensive Crossflow Separation
Aerospace 2015, 2(3), 461-481; doi:10.3390/aerospace2030461
Received: 11 June 2015 / Revised: 8 July 2015 / Accepted: 8 July 2015 / Published: 14 July 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (5519 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The reasons for the difficulty in simulating accurately strong 3-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SBLIs) and high-alpha flows with classical turbulence models are investigated. These flows are characterized by the appearance of strong crossflow separation. In view of recent additional evidence, a
[...] Read more.
The reasons for the difficulty in simulating accurately strong 3-D shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SBLIs) and high-alpha flows with classical turbulence models are investigated. These flows are characterized by the appearance of strong crossflow separation. In view of recent additional evidence, a previously published flow analysis, which attributes the poor performance of classical turbulence models to the observed laminarization of the separation domain, is reexamined. According to this analysis, the longitudinal vortices into which the separated boundary layer rolls up in this type of separated flow, transfer external inviscid air into the part of the separation adjacent to the wall, decreasing its turbulence. It is demonstrated that linear models based on the Boussinesq equation provide solutions of moderate accuracy, while non-linear ones and others that consider the particular structure of the flow are more efficient. Published and new Reynolds Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) simulations are reviewed, as well as results from a recent Large Eddy Simulation (LES) study, which indicate that in calculations characterized by sufficient accuracy the turbulent kinetic energy of the reverse flow inside the separation vortices is very low, i.e., the flow is almost laminar there. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in SWBLI Research)
Figures

Open AccessReview Numerical Study of Shock Wave Attenuation in Two-Dimensional Ducts Using Solid Obstacles: How to Utilize Shock Focusing Techniques to Attenuate Shock Waves
Aerospace 2015, 2(2), 203-221; doi:10.3390/aerospace2020203
Received: 5 March 2015 / Revised: 6 April 2015 / Accepted: 23 April 2015 / Published: 30 April 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (25362 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Research on shock wave mitigation in channels has been a topic of much attention in the shock wave community. One approach to attenuate an incident shock wave is to use obstacles of various geometries arranged in different patterns. This work is inspired by
[...] Read more.
Research on shock wave mitigation in channels has been a topic of much attention in the shock wave community. One approach to attenuate an incident shock wave is to use obstacles of various geometries arranged in different patterns. This work is inspired by the study from Chaudhuri et al. (2013), in which cylinders, squares and triangles placed in staggered and non-staggered subsequent columns were used to attenuate a planar incident shock wave. Here, we present numerical simulations using a different obstacle pattern. Instead of using a matrix of obstacles, an arrangement of square or cylindrical obstacles placed along a logarithmic spiral curve is investigated, which is motivated by our previous work on shock focusing using logarithmic spirals. Results show that obstacles placed along a logarithmic spiral can delay both the transmitted and the reflected shock wave. For different incident shock Mach numbers, away from the logarithmic spiral design Mach number, this shape is effective to either delay the transmitted or the reflected shock wave. Results also confirm that the degree of attenuation depends on the obstacle shape, effective flow area and obstacle arrangement, much like other obstacle configurations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in SWBLI Research)
Figures

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Aerospace Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
aerospace@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Aerospace
Back to Top