Special Issue "Physical and Applied Chemistry of Novel Materials and Their Applications"

A special issue of ChemEngineering (ISSN 2305-7084).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 May 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Johan Jacquemin

Université F. Rabelais, Faculté des Sciences, Laboratoire PCM2E, Parc Grandmont, 37200 Tours, France
Website | E-Mail
Interests: thermodynamics; chemical engineering process; physical and applied chemistry of novel materials; chemical engineering properties and applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an original and unique environment for researchers in academia and industry to share and discuss their cutting-edge results on the physical and applied chemistry of novel materials (such as ionic liquids, MOF, perovskites, ferroelectrics materials, nanomaterials, nanocatalysts, nanocomposite membrane, plasma technology, hybrid organic/inorganic sensors, biodegradable polymers, novel technological membranes, aerogels, novel heat transfer fluids, etc.) covering their characterization, modelling, and/or applications.

These novel materials possess unique properties useful for a wide range of applications in fields as diverse as petrochemicals, energy storage, fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, hydrometallurgy, environmental remediation and nuclear sciences. In all these fields, such materials can provide novel research strategies and technologies that enable major contributions towards establishing the sustainable processes required for the future of the process industry.

Topics

  • Application of advanced materials for
    a. Analytical separations
    b. Absorption/Adsorption
    c. Crystallization
    d. Distillation
    e. Extraction/Leaching
    f. Membrane separations
    g. Purification
    h. Novel separation processes
    I. Energy storage
  • Applications of advanced materials in
    a. Electrochemistry
    b. Biotechnology and biorefining
    c. Chemicals, pharmaceuticals and/or petrochemicals
    d. Gas capture and utilization
    e. Environmental remediation
    f. Polymerization
    g. Surface cleaning
    h. Waste treatment
  • Process modeling and fundamental studies 
    a. Equations of state
    b. Molecular modeling and simulation
    c. Electronic structure calculations
    d. Process simulation
    e. Group contribution modeling
    f. QSPR/QSAR modeling

Dr. Johan Jacquemin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ChemEngineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Novel Materials (For example: ionic liquids, MOF, perovskites, ferroelectrics materials, nanomaterials, nanocatalysts, nanocomposite membrane, plasma technology, hybrid organic/inorganic sensors, biodegradable polymers, novel technological membranes, aerogels, novel heat transfer fluids, etc.)
  • Physical Chemistry
  • Chemical Chemistry
  • Characterization, Chemical Engineering Applications

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Effects of Grafting Azacrown Ether on Thermal and Swelling Properties of Chitosan Films
ChemEngineering 2017, 1(2), 16; doi:10.3390/chemengineering1020016
Received: 20 September 2017 / Revised: 7 November 2017 / Accepted: 15 November 2017 / Published: 17 November 2017
PDF Full-text (8111 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The thermal and swelling properties of a series of azacrown ether-crosslinked chitosans prepared with varying molar amounts of N,N-diallyl-7,13-diaza-1,7,10,16-tetraoxa-dibenzo-18-crown-6 (molar equivalents ranging from 0, 0.125, 0.167, 0.25 and 0.5) films were studied with Thermographimetric analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dynamic Mechanical
[...] Read more.
The thermal and swelling properties of a series of azacrown ether-crosslinked chitosans prepared with varying molar amounts of N,N-diallyl-7,13-diaza-1,7,10,16-tetraoxa-dibenzo-18-crown-6 (molar equivalents ranging from 0, 0.125, 0.167, 0.25 and 0.5) films were studied with Thermographimetric analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dynamic Mechanical analysis (DMA) techniques and swelling kinetics. Introducing the azacrown (DAC) as crosslinker into the chitosan matrices (Ch) altered the thermal and swelling properties of the chitosan/crown ether films (Ch-DAC) systematically with respect to molar ratios. At lower DAC content, a depression of Tg revealed a dominating internal plasticization effect of DAC on chitosan, while higher DAC molar ratios systematically increased the Tg of the network. The films high swelling capacity (as high as 1200%) was reached within three hours in aqueous acidic media and decreased systematically with increasing DAC content. The swelling behavior was highly dependent on pH and followed second order kinetics. Understanding the thermal and swelling properties of this series of azacrown ether-crosslinked chitosans sets the stage to further shed light on their impact for heavy metal adsorption in water remediation applications. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Dissolution of Trihexyltetradecylphosphonium Chloride in Supercritical CO2
ChemEngineering 2017, 1(2), 12; doi:10.3390/chemengineering1020012
Received: 20 September 2017 / Revised: 27 October 2017 / Accepted: 30 October 2017 / Published: 3 November 2017
PDF Full-text (1951 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We present steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic data derived from coumarin 153 (C153) in a binary solution comprised of trihexyltetradecylphosphonium chloride ([P6,6,6,14]+Cl) and supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Steady-state fluorescence of C153 was measured in neat
[...] Read more.
We present steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic data derived from coumarin 153 (C153) in a binary solution comprised of trihexyltetradecylphosphonium chloride ([P6,6,6,14]+Cl) and supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Steady-state fluorescence of C153 was measured in neat scCO2 and ionic liquid (IL)-modified scCO2 solutions. The steady-state excitation and emission peak frequency data in neat scCO2 and IL/scCO2 diverge at low fluid density (ρr = ρ/ρc < 1). The prominent spectral differences at low fluid density provided clear evidence that C153 reports different microenvironments, and suggested that the IL is solubilized in the bulk scCO2 and heterogeneity of the C153 microenvironment is readily controlled by scCO2 density. C153 dimers have been reported in the literature, and this formed the basis of the hypothesis that dimerization is occurring in scCO2. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) electronic structure calculations yielded transition energies that were consistent with excitation spectra and provided supporting evidence for the dimer hypothesis. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements yielded triple exponential decays with time constants that further supported dimer formation. The associated fractional contributions showed that the dominant contribution to the intensity decay was from C153 monomers, and that in high density scCO2 there was minimal contribution from C153 dimers. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Novel Method Based on Spin-Coating for the Preparation of 2D and 3D Si-Based Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries
ChemEngineering 2017, 1(1), 5; doi:10.3390/chemengineering1010005
Received: 21 June 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 24 July 2017 / Published: 27 July 2017
PDF Full-text (4128 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study describes a novel strategy for preparing thin Silicon 2D and 3D electrodes for lithium ion batteries by a spin coating method. A homogeneous and stable suspension of Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) was prepared by dispersing the nanoparticles in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) or
[...] Read more.
The present study describes a novel strategy for preparing thin Silicon 2D and 3D electrodes for lithium ion batteries by a spin coating method. A homogeneous and stable suspension of Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) was prepared by dispersing the nanoparticles in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) or in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Pyr14TFSI). This proposed methodology was successfully employed to prepare 2D and 3D with different aspect ratios electrodes. Both 2D and 3D materials were then used as anode materials. The 2D SiNPs anodes exhibit a high reversible capacity, which is close to 3500 mAh·g−1 at C/10. For a higher discharge rate, the capacity of the 2D anode is considerably improved by dispersing the nanoparticles in Pyr14TFSI instead of NMP solvent. In order to further improve the anode performances, graphene particles were added to the SiNPs suspension. The anodes prepared using this suspension method exhibit relatively low columbic efficiency during the first few cycles (less than 30%) and low reversible capacity (2800 mAh·g−1 at C/10). The 3D SiNPs (NMP) electrode shows a higher intensity during cyclic voltammograms and a better stability under galvanostatic cycling than the 2D SiNPs (NMP) electrode. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Ionic Liquid as Reaction Media for the Production of Cellulose-Derived Polymers from Cellulosic Biomass
ChemEngineering 2017, 1(2), 10; doi:10.3390/chemengineering1020010
Received: 28 July 2017 / Revised: 14 October 2017 / Accepted: 17 October 2017 / Published: 23 October 2017
PDF Full-text (962 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The most frequent polymer on nature is cellulose that is present together with lignin and hemicellulose in vegetal biomass. Cellulose can be, in the future, sustainable raw matter for chemicals, fuels, and materials. Nevertheless, only 0.3% of cellulose is processed nowadays due to
[...] Read more.
The most frequent polymer on nature is cellulose that is present together with lignin and hemicellulose in vegetal biomass. Cellulose can be, in the future, sustainable raw matter for chemicals, fuels, and materials. Nevertheless, only 0.3% of cellulose is processed nowadays due to the difficulty in dissolving it, and only a small proportion is used for the production of synthetic cellulosic fibers especially esters and other cellulose derivatives, normally in extremely polluting processes. The efficient and clean dissolution of cellulose is a major objective in cellulose research and development. Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered “green” solvents due to their low vapor pressure, that prevents them evaporating into the atmosphere. In addition, these molten salts present advantages in process intensification, leading to more than 70 patents in lignocellulosic biomass in ILs being published since 2005, most of them related to the production of cellulose derived polymers, e.g., acetates, benzoylates, sulfates, fuorates, phthalates, succinates, tritylates, or silylates. In this work, the use of ILs for production of cellulose derived polymers is thoroughly studied. To do so, in the first place, a brief summary of the state of the art in cellulose derivatives production is presented, as well as the main features of ILs in cellulose processing applications. Later, the main results in the production of cellulose derivatives using ILs are presented, followed by an analysis of the industrial viability of the process, considering aspects such as environmental concerns and ILs’ recyclability. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top