Special Issue "Physical and Applied Chemistry of Novel Materials and Their Applications"

A special issue of ChemEngineering (ISSN 2305-7084).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2017

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Johan Jacquemin

School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, the Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast BT9 5AG, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: thermodynamics; chemical engineering process; physical and applied chemistry of novel materials; chemical engineering properties and applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an original and unique environment for researchers in academia and industry to share and discuss their cutting-edge results on the physical and applied chemistry of novel materials (such as ionic liquids, MOF, perovskites, ferroelectrics materials, nanomaterials, nanocatalysts, nanocomposite membrane, plasma technology, hybrid organic/inorganic sensors, biodegradable polymers, novel technological membranes, aerogels, novel heat transfer fluids, etc.) covering their characterization, modelling, and/or applications.

These novel materials possess unique properties useful for a wide range of applications in fields as diverse as petrochemicals, energy storage, fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, hydrometallurgy, environmental remediation and nuclear sciences. In all these fields, such materials can provide novel research strategies and technologies that enable major contributions towards establishing the sustainable processes required for the future of the process industry.

Topics

  • Application of advanced materials for
    a. Analytical separations
    b. Absorption/Adsorption
    c. Crystallization
    d. Distillation
    e. Extraction/Leaching
    f. Membrane separations
    g. Purification
    h. Novel separation processes
    I. Energy storage
  • Applications of advanced materials in
    a. Electrochemistry
    b. Biotechnology and biorefining
    c. Chemicals, pharmaceuticals and/or petrochemicals
    d. Gas capture and utilization
    e. Environmental remediation
    f. Polymerization
    g. Surface cleaning
    h. Waste treatment
  • Process modeling and fundamental studies 
    a. Equations of state
    b. Molecular modeling and simulation
    c. Electronic structure calculations
    d. Process simulation
    e. Group contribution modeling
    f. QSPR/QSAR modeling

Dr. Johan Jacquemin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ChemEngineering is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Novel Materials (For example: ionic liquids, MOF, perovskites, ferroelectrics materials, nanomaterials, nanocatalysts, nanocomposite membrane, plasma technology, hybrid organic/inorganic sensors, biodegradable polymers, novel technological membranes, aerogels, novel heat transfer fluids, etc.)
  • Physical Chemistry
  • Chemical Chemistry
  • Characterization, Chemical Engineering Applications

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Novel Method Based on Spin-Coating for the Preparation of 2D and 3D Si-Based Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries
ChemEngineering 2017, 1(1), 5; doi:10.3390/chemengineering1010005
Received: 21 June 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 24 July 2017 / Published: 27 July 2017
PDF Full-text (4128 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present study describes a novel strategy for preparing thin Silicon 2D and 3D electrodes for lithium ion batteries by a spin coating method. A homogeneous and stable suspension of Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) was prepared by dispersing the nanoparticles in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) or
[...] Read more.
The present study describes a novel strategy for preparing thin Silicon 2D and 3D electrodes for lithium ion batteries by a spin coating method. A homogeneous and stable suspension of Si nanoparticles (SiNPs) was prepared by dispersing the nanoparticles in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) or in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (Pyr14TFSI). This proposed methodology was successfully employed to prepare 2D and 3D with different aspect ratios electrodes. Both 2D and 3D materials were then used as anode materials. The 2D SiNPs anodes exhibit a high reversible capacity, which is close to 3500 mAh·g−1 at C/10. For a higher discharge rate, the capacity of the 2D anode is considerably improved by dispersing the nanoparticles in Pyr14TFSI instead of NMP solvent. In order to further improve the anode performances, graphene particles were added to the SiNPs suspension. The anodes prepared using this suspension method exhibit relatively low columbic efficiency during the first few cycles (less than 30%) and low reversible capacity (2800 mAh·g−1 at C/10). The 3D SiNPs (NMP) electrode shows a higher intensity during cyclic voltammograms and a better stability under galvanostatic cycling than the 2D SiNPs (NMP) electrode. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Ionic Liquid as Reaction Media for the Production of Cellulose-Derived Polymers from Cellulosic Biomass Byproducts
Authors: Joana M. Lopes, M. Dolores Bermejo *, Ángel Martín, M. José Cocero
Affiliation: High Pressure Process Group, Department of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Technology, Universidad de Valladolid (Spain), C/ Doctor Mergelina s/n, 47011, Valladolid, Spain
AbstractThe most abundant natural polymer on Earth is cellulose that is present together with lignin and hemicellulose in vegetal biomass. Cellulose is a promising sustainable source of chemicals, fuels and materials. Nevertheless only 0.3% of cellulose is processed nowadays due to the difficulty in dissolving it, and only a small proportion is used as starting material for the production of synthetic cellulosic fibres especially esters and other cellulose derivatives, normally in extremely polluting processes. The efficient dissolution of cellulose is a long-standing goal in cellulose research and development. Ionic liquids (ILs) are considered "green" solvent due to their negligible vapour pressure that prevents them of passing to the environment. In addition, these molten salts present advantages in process intensification that makes that more than 70 patents in lignocellulosic biomass in ILs had been published since 2005, most of them related with the production of cellulose derived polymers, e.g. acetates, benzoylates, sulfates, fuorates, phthalates, succinates, tritylates or silylates. In this work, the use of ILs for the production of cellulose derived polymers is thoroughly studied. To do so, in first place a brief summary of the state of the art in cellulose derivatives production is presented, as well as the main features of ILs in cellulose processing application. Later the main results in the production of cellulose derivatives using ILs are presented followed by an analysis of the industrial viability of the process considering aspects such as, environmental concerns and ILs recyclability.

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