Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Humanities, Volume 6, Issue 3 (September 2017)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-20
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Flower Power: Desire, Gender, and Folk Belief in the Joycean Mary Garden
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 44; doi:10.3390/h6030044
Received: 29 May 2017 / Revised: 22 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 30 June 2017
PDF Full-text (202 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Robert Brazeau and Derek Gladwin’s Eco-Joyce (2014) largely overlooks a historical basis for ecocritical thought. The absence of a historicist view requires consideration not only of the natural world but folk botany, such as the Mary Garden that is a phantom presence in
[...] Read more.
Robert Brazeau and Derek Gladwin’s Eco-Joyce (2014) largely overlooks a historical basis for ecocritical thought. The absence of a historicist view requires consideration not only of the natural world but folk botany, such as the Mary Garden that is a phantom presence in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man as well as in “Nausicaa” and “Penelope” in Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. The undergrowth of the garden reconfigures human action and subtly predicts it with its compendium of theological and devotional meanings for the burgeoning sexuality expressed by Gerty MacDowell and Issy Earwicker as well as the mature longing of Molly Bloom. This essay will establish a fresh Deleuzian paradigm of Becoming-Flower to demonstrate how the Mary Garden blooms to present new perspectives on Catholicism, eros, and gender identity in Joyce’s major works. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Joyce’s “Force” and His Tuskers as Modern Animals
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 45; doi:10.3390/h6030045
Received: 1 June 2017 / Revised: 27 June 2017 / Accepted: 28 June 2017 / Published: 3 July 2017
PDF Full-text (593 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Focusing on those animals that have been overlooked in reading Joyce’s work opens up new perspectives for understanding his writing. One of his earliest essays, “Force” (1898), written at the age of sixteen, shows his so far unexplored concern about the domestication of
[...] Read more.
Focusing on those animals that have been overlooked in reading Joyce’s work opens up new perspectives for understanding his writing. One of his earliest essays, “Force” (1898), written at the age of sixteen, shows his so far unexplored concern about the domestication of animals and extinction of species, and develops a theory of subjugation. The essay provides a useful mainstay for considering the “tuskers,” (the mammoth and mastodon, the elephants, their tusks, and ivory) in the context of the cultural discourses of modern society. The game-changer discovery of the notion of extinction; representation of mammoths and mastodons as fearful creatures; the novelty of elephants exposed to curious gaze on exhibition; the sculpture of Elvery’s Elephant House in Sackville street; a circus elephant and “terrible queer creature” episode in Stephen Hero; the forced labor perpetrated in the Congo Free State to exploit rubber and the ivory of wild elephants. These seemingly disparate topics deeply wedded to modernity will be interrelated with each other in “Force,” shaping a constellation of “Joyce’s tuskers.” Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle The Eyes of That Cow: Eating Animals and Theorizing Vegetarianism in James Joyce’s Ulysses
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 46; doi:10.3390/h6030046
Received: 25 May 2017 / Revised: 26 June 2017 / Accepted: 26 June 2017 / Published: 4 July 2017
PDF Full-text (233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
At the end of the nineteenth century more than half of Ireland’s entire land surface was being used for the raising of livestock, most of which was transported through Dublin on its way to England to be slaughtered and eaten. The same period
[...] Read more.
At the end of the nineteenth century more than half of Ireland’s entire land surface was being used for the raising of livestock, most of which was transported through Dublin on its way to England to be slaughtered and eaten. The same period saw the development of a new social phenomena of vegetarianism amongst Ireland’s intellectuals and literary figures. This article focuses on James Joyce’s portrayal of livestock, meat and vegetarianism in Ulysses, examining how the novel engages with the politics of cattle raising, the emergence of industrialized animal slaughter and the ethics of meat eating at the turn of the twentieth century. Attending to the ways in which Joyce both historicizes and theorizes the lives of animals and the production of meat, this article places Ulysses in dialogue with recent writings on animal ethics by Jacques Derrida and J. M. Coetzee and the emergence of what is being termed “vegan studies” to suggest a vegetarian reading of Joyce’s novel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Assembling the Assemblage: Developing Schizocartography in Support of an Urban Semiology
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 47; doi:10.3390/h6030047
Received: 7 June 2017 / Revised: 29 June 2017 / Accepted: 6 July 2017 / Published: 10 July 2017
PDF Full-text (241 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Abstracts: This article looks at the formulation of a methodology that incorporates a walking-based practice and borrows from a variety of theories in order to create a flexible tool that is able to critique and express the multiplicities of experiences produced by moving
[...] Read more.
Abstracts: This article looks at the formulation of a methodology that incorporates a walking-based practice and borrows from a variety of theories in order to create a flexible tool that is able to critique and express the multiplicities of experiences produced by moving about the built environment. Inherent in postmodernism is the availability of a multitude of objects (or texts) available for reuse, reinterpretation, and appropriation under the umbrella of bricolage. The author discusses her development of schizocartography (the conflation of a phrase belonging to Félix Guattari) and how she has incorporated elements from Situationist psychogeography, Marxist geography, and poststructural theory and placed them alongside theories that examine subjectivity. This toolbox enables multiple possibilities for interpretation which reflect the actual heterogeneity of place and also mirror the complexities that are integral in challenging the totalizing perspective of space that capitalism encourages. Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Code and Substrate: Reconceiving the Actual in Digital Art and Poetry
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 48; doi:10.3390/h6030048
Received: 12 December 2016 / Revised: 13 June 2017 / Accepted: 5 July 2017 / Published: 14 July 2017
PDF Full-text (297 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The quality of digital poetry or art—not merely as contained within our aesthetic reaction to digitally expressive works but as well our intellectual grounding in them—suggests that the digital’s seemingly ephemeral character is an indication of its lack of an apparently material existence.
[...] Read more.
The quality of digital poetry or art—not merely as contained within our aesthetic reaction to digitally expressive works but as well our intellectual grounding in them—suggests that the digital’s seemingly ephemeral character is an indication of its lack of an apparently material existence. While, aesthetically, the digital’s ephemerality lies in the very fact of the digitally artistic enterprise, the fact is that its material substrate is what makes the aesthetic pleasure we take in it possible. When we realize for ourselves the role played by this substrate, furthermore, a paradox looms up before us. The fact is that we both enjoy, and in some sense separately understand the artwork comprehensively and fully; we also allow ourselves to enter into an ongoing conversation about the nature of the physical world. This conversation is not insignificant for the world of art especially, inasmuch as art depends upon the actual materials of the world—even digital art—and, too, upon our physical engagement with the art. Digital poetry and art, whose dynamic demands the dissolution of the line that would otherwise distinguish one from the other, have brought the notion of embodiment to the fore of our considerations of them, and here is the charm, along with the paradoxical strength, of digital art and poetry: it is our physical participation in them that makes them fully come into being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Poetics of Computation)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle The Search for Dog in Cervantes
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 49; doi:10.3390/h6030049
Received: 20 March 2017 / Revised: 9 July 2017 / Accepted: 11 July 2017 / Published: 14 July 2017
PDF Full-text (1963 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reconsiders the missing galgo from the first line in Don Quixote with a set of interlocking claims: first, that Cervantes initially established the groundwork for including a talking dog in Don Quixote; second, through improvisation Cervantes created a better Don
[...] Read more.
This paper reconsiders the missing galgo from the first line in Don Quixote with a set of interlocking claims: first, that Cervantes initially established the groundwork for including a talking dog in Don Quixote; second, through improvisation Cervantes created a better Don Quixote by transplanting the idea for a talking dog to the Coloquio; and third, that Cervantes made oblique references to the concept of dogs having human intelligence within the novel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Animal Narratology)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle “Tatters, Bloom’s Cat, and Other Animals in Ulysses
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 50; doi:10.3390/h6030050
Received: 5 May 2017 / Revised: 17 July 2017 / Accepted: 17 July 2017 / Published: 20 July 2017
PDF Full-text (199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Given how few animals appear in the stories of Dubliners and in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, we may be surprised to find a dog and a cat playing small roles in the third and fourth chapters of
[...] Read more.
Given how few animals appear in the stories of Dubliners and in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, we may be surprised to find a dog and a cat playing small roles in the third and fourth chapters of Ulysses. Their appearance in adjacent episodes is neither coincidental nor entirely casual, however, if one takes a careful look at their presentations. The animals’ circumstances are very different. Stephen Dedalus has been walking along the strand at Sandymount, when he spots a dog running along the sand, followed by its owners, a man and a woman whom he assumes to be cocklepickers. In the next chapter, Leopold Bloom is preparing breakfast for his wife when he hears his cat meowing and pours her some milk in a small bowl. It is particularly worth looking at the narration of these two scenarios because the different human perceptions and responses to animals they present help us analyze the challenges of resisting animal anthropomorphizing and its implications for the limitations and boundaries of preserving the status of animal “otherness” in a work of fiction. Put differently, the narrative strategies in “Proteus” and “Calypso” manage to maintain animal identity as that of “actors” rather than “characters,” while demonstrating what is required to maintain this status for them. I will discuss these two animals, dog and cat, in the order in which they appear in Ulysses, as well as a number of other animals appearing later in the work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Two Walks with Objects
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 51; doi:10.3390/h6030051
Received: 21 June 2017 / Revised: 17 July 2017 / Accepted: 20 July 2017 / Published: 22 July 2017
PDF Full-text (16468 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
‘Two Walks With Objects’ attempts a tainted auto-ethnographic review of the affects and actions arising from reviewing the images remaining from two walks with objects, the first in 2013 and the second in 2017. The article sets out, within the context of a
[...] Read more.
‘Two Walks With Objects’ attempts a tainted auto-ethnographic review of the affects and actions arising from reviewing the images remaining from two walks with objects, the first in 2013 and the second in 2017. The article sets out, within the context of a growing discussion about the agency of unhuman and nonhuman things and a refinement of neo-vitalist and object-based ontology, to narrate affect within an archive against the effects of memory, triangulating these not with a third human source, but with the absence of the things themselves, which are present only as written descriptions and photographic representations. By framing the walks as everyday performances, the article seeks then to use a critique of documentation of performance as transforming performance into something else as an efficacious model, identifying the ‘voids’ of mythogeographical practice as that “something else”, as potential spaces where human actors can learn to live with the agency of nonhuman objects. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Ulysses and the Signature of Things
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 52; doi:10.3390/h6030052
Received: 13 June 2017 / Revised: 19 July 2017 / Accepted: 19 July 2017 / Published: 24 July 2017
PDF Full-text (244 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
James Joyce’s depiction of autographic signatures resembles the “doctrine of signatures”—a pre-modern system of correspondence between medicinal plants and parts of the body. Certain aspects of this episteme reappear in the late nineteenth century. This recurrence is due, in large part, to developments
[...] Read more.
James Joyce’s depiction of autographic signatures resembles the “doctrine of signatures”—a pre-modern system of correspondence between medicinal plants and parts of the body. Certain aspects of this episteme reappear in the late nineteenth century. This recurrence is due, in large part, to developments in the technology of writing that threaten what Friedrich Kittler calls the “surrogate sensuality of handwriting.” Reading the “Nausicaa” episode of Ulysses against fin-de-siècle ideas about graphology, I argue that signature offers a unique perspective on Joyce’s taxonomic representation, which questions the boundaries between a body of text and (non)human bodies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Rage and Anxiety in the Split between Freud and Jung
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 53; doi:10.3390/h6030053
Received: 4 June 2017 / Revised: 21 July 2017 / Accepted: 25 July 2017 / Published: 27 July 2017
PDF Full-text (230 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This article focuses on the period of the historic rupture between Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, approximately the period from 1909 to 1913. It examines the relevance of rage and anxiety in the process of escalating conflict culminating in a definitive separation. Their
[...] Read more.
This article focuses on the period of the historic rupture between Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, approximately the period from 1909 to 1913. It examines the relevance of rage and anxiety in the process of escalating conflict culminating in a definitive separation. Their estrangement led to a theoretical parting of the ways, signified by the divergence between psychoanalysis and analytical psychology. This study begins from the understanding that, for both Freud and Jung, private life experiences, personal relationships and conflicts, and their emotional responses were deeply intertwined with the processes of theorising and writing. The rift and final split were accompanied by large amounts of rage and anxiety on both sides, which continued to have emotional reverberations on the two famous psychologists for the rest of their lives. This paper will look at how the emotional pressures generated by the feud influenced the theoretical work on the emotional life they produced during this period: Freud’s Totem and Taboo (1913) and “The History of the Psycho-analytic Movement” (1914), and Jung’s Psychology of the Unconscious (1912). Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle De Anima: Or, Ulysses and the Theological Turn in Modernist Studies
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 57; doi:10.3390/h6030057
Received: 1 June 2017 / Revised: 27 July 2017 / Accepted: 28 July 2017 / Published: 4 August 2017
PDF Full-text (272 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Focusing on Joyce’s use of Aristotle’s De Anima, and on Aquinas’s response to Aristotle, this essay takes, as its starting point, the recourse to two areas of enquiry in recent work on modernism: animal studies and phenomenology. In this essay we examine the
[...] Read more.
Focusing on Joyce’s use of Aristotle’s De Anima, and on Aquinas’s response to Aristotle, this essay takes, as its starting point, the recourse to two areas of enquiry in recent work on modernism: animal studies and phenomenology. In this essay we examine the intersection within Ulysses of the concept of the soul in Aristotle and Aquinas, show how this relates to questions of animality, and open the way to asking what implication the theological reflection on the soul at the centre of Ulysses might have for a process of uncovering theological contents in the concept of “life” in modernist studies more generally. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle The Bestial Feminine in Finnegans Wake
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 58; doi:10.3390/h6030058
Received: 10 June 2017 / Revised: 29 July 2017 / Accepted: 31 July 2017 / Published: 4 August 2017
PDF Full-text (228 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Female characters frequently appear as animals in the unstable universe of James Joyce’s a Finnegans Wake. What Kimberly Devlin terms “the male tendency to reduce women to the level of the beast” is manifest in Finnegans Wake on a large scale. From
[...] Read more.
Female characters frequently appear as animals in the unstable universe of James Joyce’s a Finnegans Wake. What Kimberly Devlin terms “the male tendency to reduce women to the level of the beast” is manifest in Finnegans Wake on a large scale. From the hen pecking at a dung heap which we suppose is a manifestation of matriarch Anna Livia Plurabelle, to the often lascivious pig imagery (reminiscent of Bloom’s experience with brothel-keeper Bella in the “Circe” episode of Ulysses) associated with juvenile seductress Issy, the lines between animal and human are frequently blurred when it comes to representing the feminine in the Wake. As scholars such as Devlin have highlighted, such constellations of images have their roots in blatantly misogynistic iconographies. Indeed, the reinscription of female characters into bestial roles in the Wake echoes a religious history of the dehumanisation of women. Yet, while this gendered representational tendency has been noted in Joycean and, more recently, wider modernist studies, its deployment and impact as a cultural and literary trope has not yet been interpreted according to the sociohistorical and cultural contexts which shaped the composition of Finnegans Wake. In particular, the culturally-specific sexual politics of Free State Ireland (1922–1937), against which Joyce arguably pushes throughout the entirety of the Wake, offer a suggestive lens through which to view the text’s interconnected representations of the feminine and the bestial. This article suggests that, in Finnegans Wake, the nonhuman is a mode through which Joyce explores the fraught sexual politics of early twentieth-century Ireland. Specifically, the bestial feminine becomes an avenue to inspect, expose, and satirise prevalent contemporary fears over female sexual licentiousness and national moral decline. Historicising the text’s grappling with themes of carnality and baseness, the article discusses the ways in which the woman-as-animal is deployed in Finnegans Wake as a grotesque symbol of an unbridled and threatening female sexuality—an extreme embodiment of 1920s and 1930s Ireland’s worst fears surrounding the perceived degeneration of Irish women’s modesty. Unearthing the Wake’s social contexts in order to interpret its sexual politics, this article ultimately asks whether the trope of the woman-as-animal stages a complete resistance against the conservatism of early twentieth-century Ireland’s sexual politics, or whether Joyce’s invocation of a historically misogynistic and patriarchal construction risks reinforcing the dehumanisation of women, moving the text’s sexual politics further away from the liberatory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Open AccessArticle “It always Takes a Long Time/to Decipher Where You Are”: Uncanny Spaces and Troubled Times in Margaret Atwood’s Poetry
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 63; doi:10.3390/h6030063
Received: 27 July 2017 / Revised: 11 August 2017 / Accepted: 15 August 2017 / Published: 18 August 2017
PDF Full-text (525 KB)
Abstract
The focus is on Atwood’s most recent poetry collections; Morning in the Burned House (1995) and The Door (2007), in addition to the prose poems volume The Tent (2006). They have in common, albeit with a different emphasis, a preoccupation with mortality and
[...] Read more.
The focus is on Atwood’s most recent poetry collections; Morning in the Burned House (1995) and The Door (2007), in addition to the prose poems volume The Tent (2006). They have in common, albeit with a different emphasis, a preoccupation with mortality and with the writing of poetry itself. They also share a special concern for space. This reading considers space and landscape to function as metonyms. Space here is far from being passive; instead it is constantly in the process of being constructed. The disorientation that the poetic personae experience in these texts follows a labyrinthine pattern where heterogeneity and multiplicity in the sense of contemporaneous plurality prevail. In this perspective, the identity of a place becomes open and provisional, including that of a place called home. Full article

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperCreative Quantum Notes on Classic Places
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 54; doi:10.3390/h6030054
Received: 7 July 2017 / Accepted: 21 July 2017 / Published: 31 July 2017
PDF Full-text (2168 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
I would like to sing about an unstable, yet constant force that stresses and pushes imagination. It makes cultural and social transformations a process to experience in person. [...] Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessEssay Not Its Own Meaning: A Hermeneutic of the World
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 55; doi:10.3390/h6030055
Received: 28 June 2017 / Revised: 14 July 2017 / Accepted: 28 July 2017 / Published: 2 August 2017
PDF Full-text (231 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The contemporary cultural mindset posits that the world has no intrinsic semantic value. The meaning we see in it is supposedly projected onto the world by ourselves. Underpinning this view is the mainstream physicalist ontology, according to which mind is an emergent property
[...] Read more.
The contemporary cultural mindset posits that the world has no intrinsic semantic value. The meaning we see in it is supposedly projected onto the world by ourselves. Underpinning this view is the mainstream physicalist ontology, according to which mind is an emergent property or epiphenomenon of brains. As such, since the world beyond brains isn’t mental, it cannot a priori evoke anything beyond itself. But a consistent series of recent experimental results suggests strongly that the world may in fact be mental in nature, a hypothesis openly discussed in the field of foundations of physics. In this essay, these experimental results are reviewed and their hermeneutic implications discussed. If the world is mental, it points to something beyond its face-value appearances and is amenable to interpretation, just as ordinary dreams. In this case, the project of a Hermeneutic of Everything is metaphysically justifiable. Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperEssay A Portrait of the Animal as a Young Artist: Animality, Instinct, and Cognition in Joyce’s Early Prose
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 56; doi:10.3390/h6030056
Received: 2 June 2017 / Revised: 28 July 2017 / Accepted: 31 July 2017 / Published: 3 August 2017
PDF Full-text (226 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This essay situates James Joyce within the competing discourses of Catholic theology, evolutionary biology, and Nietzsche’s philosophy, with emphasis on their attitudes towards the body and the animal-human boundary. Joyce’s use of “instinct” in his early works (Dubliners, Stephen Hero,
[...] Read more.
This essay situates James Joyce within the competing discourses of Catholic theology, evolutionary biology, and Nietzsche’s philosophy, with emphasis on their attitudes towards the body and the animal-human boundary. Joyce’s use of “instinct” in his early works (Dubliners, Stephen Hero, and A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man) helps us understand his movement from a view of animals and the human body as frightening or paralyzing to a more open acceptance of the body and its impulses. This transition from portraying the body as an impediment in Dubliners to a source of knowledge or cognition in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man helps us better understand Joyce’s early prose and his embrace of both animal and human bodies in his later works. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Joyce, Animals and the Nonhuman)
Open AccessFeature PaperCreative Collaborations on the Edge
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 59; doi:10.3390/h6030059
Received: 7 July 2017 / Revised: 27 July 2017 / Accepted: 27 July 2017 / Published: 7 August 2017
PDF Full-text (2630 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since 2005 I have been working with mobile communities in the cities of Berlin, Germany and Johannesburg, South Africa.[...] Full article
Figures

Figure 1a

Open AccessFeature PaperCreative ‘Space of Refuge’: Negotiating Space with Refugees Inside the Palestinian Camp
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 60; doi:10.3390/h6030060
Received: 7 July 2017 / Accepted: 20 July 2017 / Published: 16 August 2017
PDF Full-text (4405 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
‘Space of Refuge’ is a spatial installation directly addressing issues of inhabitation within Palestinian refugee camps in different host countries. It does so by illustrating the various modes of spatial production and subsequent evolution of Palestinian refugee camps, with particular focus upon unofficial
[...] Read more.
‘Space of Refuge’ is a spatial installation directly addressing issues of inhabitation within Palestinian refugee camps in different host countries. It does so by illustrating the various modes of spatial production and subsequent evolution of Palestinian refugee camps, with particular focus upon unofficial acts of “spatial violation” that have emerged because of the increasingly protracted nature of the refugee situation. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperCreative Uncovering Culture and Identity in Refugee Camps
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 61; doi:10.3390/h6030061
Received: 7 July 2017 / Accepted: 7 August 2017 / Published: 16 August 2017
PDF Full-text (1608 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Refugee camps, especially in their emergency phases, are places where everything seems to be similar, repetitive, and modular. This impression is not only due to the unified shelter unit that is usually distributed by UNHCR1 (traditionally a tent, and recently caravans, prefabs, and
[...] Read more.
Refugee camps, especially in their emergency phases, are places where everything seems to be similar, repetitive, and modular. This impression is not only due to the unified shelter unit that is usually distributed by UNHCR1 (traditionally a tent, and recently caravans, prefabs, and developed T-Shelters), but is also due to the camps’ ordered layout and hierarchical plan (Figures 1–3).[...] Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperCreative On the Slab, Our Architecture under Construction
Humanities 2017, 6(3), 62; doi:10.3390/h6030062
Received: 19 July 2017 / Accepted: 7 August 2017 / Published: 17 August 2017
PDF Full-text (780 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The 1950s and 60s was marked by the developmentalism, industrialization, and modernization of peripheral capitalism of Brazil and by the demographic explosion and unprecedented urban expansion in the country. Throughout these decades, São Paulo became the political, cultural, and economic epicenter of Brazil,
[...] Read more.
The 1950s and 60s was marked by the developmentalism, industrialization, and modernization of peripheral capitalism of Brazil and by the demographic explosion and unprecedented urban expansion in the country. Throughout these decades, São Paulo became the political, cultural, and economic epicenter of Brazil, Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Humanities Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
E-Mail: 
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Humanities Edit a special issue Review for Humanities
logo
loading...
Back to Top