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Insects 2017, 8(4), 121; doi:10.3390/insects8040121

Can Flowering Greencover Crops Promote Biological Control in German Vineyards?

1
Julius Kühn-Institute, Institute for Plant Protection in Fruit Crops and Viticulture, Geilweilerhof, D-76833 Siebeldingen, Germany
2
Institute for Environmental Sciences, University of Koblenz-Landau, Fortstr. 7, D-76829 Landau, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Alberto Pozzebon, Carlo Duso, Gregory M. Loeb and Geoff M. Gurr
Received: 20 July 2017 / Revised: 24 October 2017 / Accepted: 30 October 2017 / Published: 3 November 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Arthropod Pest Control in Orchards and Vineyards)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [6858 KB, uploaded 3 November 2017]   |  

Abstract

Greencover crops are widely recommended to provide predators and parasitoids with floral resources for improved pest control. We studied parasitism and predation of European grapevine moth (Lobesia botrana) eggs and pupae as well as predatory mite abundances in an experimental vineyard with either one or two sowings of greencover crops compared to spontaneous vegetation. The co-occurrence between greencover flowering time and parasitoid activity differed greatly between the two study years. Parasitism was much higher when flowering and parasitoid activity coincided. While egg predation was enhanced by greencover crops, there were no significant benefits of greencover crops on parasitism of L. botrana eggs or pupae. Predatory mites did not show an as strong increase on grapevines in greencover crop plots as egg predation. Overall, our study demonstrates only limited pest control benefits of greencover crops. Given the strong within- and between year variation in natural enemy activity, studies across multiple years will be necessary to adequately describe the role of greencover crops for pest management and to identify the main predators of L. botrana eggs. View Full-Text
Keywords: habitat management; European grapevine moth; egg-predator; Trichogramma; predatory mite; Typhlodromus pyri; Itoplectis alternans; Lobesia botrana habitat management; European grapevine moth; egg-predator; Trichogramma; predatory mite; Typhlodromus pyri; Itoplectis alternans; Lobesia botrana
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Hoffmann, C.; Köckerling, J.; Biancu, S.; Gramm, T.; Michl, G.; Entling, M.H. Can Flowering Greencover Crops Promote Biological Control in German Vineyards? Insects 2017, 8, 121.

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