Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

J. Pers. Med., Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2013), Pages 1-69

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle Sensors: Views of Staff of a Disability Service Organization
J. Pers. Med. 2013, 3(1), 23-39; doi:10.3390/jpm3010023
Received: 4 January 2013 / Revised: 5 February 2013 / Accepted: 7 February 2013 / Published: 22 February 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (363 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Sensors have become ubiquitous in their reach and scope of application. They are a technological cornerstone for various modes of health surveillance and participatory medicine—such as quantifying oneself; they are also employed to track people with certain as impairments perceived ability differences. [...] Read more.
Sensors have become ubiquitous in their reach and scope of application. They are a technological cornerstone for various modes of health surveillance and participatory medicine—such as quantifying oneself; they are also employed to track people with certain as impairments perceived ability differences. This paper presents quantitative and qualitative data of an exploratory, non-generalizable study into the perceptions, attitudes and concerns of staff of a disability service organization, that mostly serve people with intellectual disabilities, towards the use of various types of sensor technologies that might be used by and with their clients. In addition, perspectives of various types of privacy issues linked to sensors, as well data regarding the concept of quantified self were obtained. Our results highlight the need to involve disabled people and their support networks in sensor and quantified-self discourses, in order to prevent undue disadvantages. Full article

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview Structured Decision-Making: Using Personalized Medicine to Improve the Value of Cancer Care
J. Pers. Med. 2013, 3(1), 1-13; doi:10.3390/jpm3010001
Received: 22 November 2012 / Revised: 19 December 2012 / Accepted: 19 December 2012 / Published: 27 December 2012
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (240 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Cancer care is often inconsistently delivered with inadequate incorporation of patient values and objective evidence into decision-making. Utilization of time limited trials of care with predefined decision points that are based on iteratively updated best evidence, tools that inform providers about a [...] Read more.
Cancer care is often inconsistently delivered with inadequate incorporation of patient values and objective evidence into decision-making. Utilization of time limited trials of care with predefined decision points that are based on iteratively updated best evidence, tools that inform providers about a patient’s experience and values, and known information about a patient’s disease will allow superior matched care to be delivered. Personalized medicine does not merely refer to the incorporation of genetic information into clinical care, it involves utilization of the wide array of data points relevant to care, many of which are readily available at the bedside today. By pushing uptake of personalized matching available today, clinicians can better address the triple aim of improved health, lowers costs, and enhanced patient experience, and we can prepare the health care landscape for the iterative inclusion of progressively more sophisticated information as newer tests and information become available to support the personalized medicine paradigm. Full article
Open AccessReview Personalized Medicine in Ophthalmology: From Pharmacogenetic Biomarkers to Therapeutic and Dosage Optimization
J. Pers. Med. 2013, 3(1), 40-69; doi:10.3390/jpm3010040
Received: 15 January 2013 / Accepted: 22 February 2013 / Published: 5 March 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (474 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Rapid progress in genomics and nanotechnology continue to advance our approach to patient care, from diagnosis and prognosis, to targeting and personalization of therapeutics. However, the clinical application of molecular diagnostics in ophthalmology has been limited even though there have been demonstrations [...] Read more.
Rapid progress in genomics and nanotechnology continue to advance our approach to patient care, from diagnosis and prognosis, to targeting and personalization of therapeutics. However, the clinical application of molecular diagnostics in ophthalmology has been limited even though there have been demonstrations of disease risk and pharmacogenetic associations. There is a high clinical need for therapeutic personalization and dosage optimization in ophthalmology and may be the focus of individualized medicine in this specialty. In several retinal conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic macular edema, retinal vein occlusion and pre-threshold retinopathy of prematurity, anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapeutics have resulted in enhanced outcomes. In glaucoma, recent advances in cytoskeletal agents and prostaglandin molecules that affect outflow and remodel the trabecular meshwork have demonstrated improved intraocular pressure control. Application of recent developments in nanoemulsion and polymeric micelle for targeted delivery and drug release are models of dosage optimization, increasing efficacy and improving outcomes in these major eye diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dosage Personalization in Modern Medicine)

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessOpinion Driving Forces Behind the Past and Future Emergence of Personalized Medicine
J. Pers. Med. 2013, 3(1), 14-22; doi:10.3390/jpm3010014
Received: 23 November 2012 / Revised: 14 January 2013 / Accepted: 14 January 2013 / Published: 17 January 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (310 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Personalized medicine can be seen as a continuously developing approach to tailoring treatments according to the individual characteristics of a patient. In some way, medicine has always been personalized. During the last decade, however, scientific and technological progress have made truly personalized [...] Read more.
Personalized medicine can be seen as a continuously developing approach to tailoring treatments according to the individual characteristics of a patient. In some way, medicine has always been personalized. During the last decade, however, scientific and technological progress have made truly personalized healthcare increasingly become reality. Today’s personalized medicine involves targeted therapies and diagnostic tests. The development of targeted agents represents a major investment opportunity to pharmaceutical companies, which have been facing the need to diversify their business due to an increasingly challenging market place. By investing into the development of personalized therapies, pharmaceutical companies mitigate a major part of the risks posed by factors such as patent expiries or generic competition. Viewing upon personalized medicine from different perspectives points out the multi-causality of its emergence. Research efforts and business diversification have been two main driving forces; they do supplement each other, however, are not jointly exhaustive in explaining the emergence of this approach. Especially in the future, a number of further stakeholders will impact the evolution of personalized medicine. Full article

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
JPM Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
jpm@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to JPM
Back to Top