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Water 2017, 9(10), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/w9100808

Water Quality Considerations on the Rise as the Use of Managed Aquifer Recharge Systems Widens

1
KWR Watercycle Research Institute, P.O. Box 1072, 3430 BB Nieuwegein, The Netherlands
2
Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, 3508 TA Utrecht, The Netherlands
3
Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geosciences, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CN Delft, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 September 2017 / Revised: 8 October 2017 / Accepted: 17 October 2017 / Published: 22 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Quality Considerations for Managed Aquifer Recharge Systems)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [193 KB, uploaded 22 October 2017]

Abstract

Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) is a promising method of increasing water availability in water stressed areas by subsurface infiltration and storage, to overcome periods of drought, and to stabilize or even reverse salinization of coastal aquifers. Moreover, MAR could be a key technique in making alternative water resources available, such as reuse of communal effluents for agriculture, industry and even indirect potable reuse. As exemplified by the papers in this Special Issue, consideration of water quality plays a major role in developing the full potential for MAR application, ranging from the improvement of water quality to operational issues (e.g., well clogging) or sustainability concerns (e.g., infiltration of treated waste water). With the application of MAR expanding into a wider range of conditions, from deserts to urban and coastal areas, and purposes, from large scale strategic storage of desalinated water and the reuse of waste water, the importance of these considerations are on the rise. Addressing these appropriately will contribute to a greater understanding, operational reliability and acceptance of MAR applications, and lead to a range of engineered MAR systems that help increase their effectiveness to help secure the availability of water at the desired quality for the future. View Full-Text
Keywords: Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR); Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR); hydrochemistry; source water quality; groundwater quality; water sources; water re-use; pre-treatment; clogging; large-scale MAR; emerging compounds; brackish/saline host aquifers; recovered water quality requirements Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR); Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR); hydrochemistry; source water quality; groundwater quality; water sources; water re-use; pre-treatment; clogging; large-scale MAR; emerging compounds; brackish/saline host aquifers; recovered water quality requirements
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Hartog, N.; Stuyfzand, P.J. Water Quality Considerations on the Rise as the Use of Managed Aquifer Recharge Systems Widens. Water 2017, 9, 808.

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