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Water 2016, 8(6), 239; doi:10.3390/w8060239

Water Resources Assessment and Management in Drylands

1
Center for Remote Sensing, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, MA 02215-1402, USA
2
U. A. Whitaker College of Engineering, Florida Gulf Coast University, 10501 FGCU Boulevard South, Fort Myers, FL 33965-6565, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Y. Jun Xu
Received: 5 May 2016 / Revised: 24 May 2016 / Accepted: 31 May 2016 / Published: 3 June 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Water Resources Assessment and Management in Drylands)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [164 KB, uploaded 3 June 2016]

Abstract

Drylands regions of the world face difficult issues in maintaining water resources to meet current demands which will intensify in the future with population increases, infrastructure development, increased agricultural water demands, and climate change impacts on the hydrologic system. New water resources evaluation and management methods will be needed to assure that water resources in drylands are optimally managed in a sustainable manner. Development of water management and conservation methods is a multi-disciplinary endeavor. Scientists and engineers must collaborate and cooperate with water managers, planners, and politicians to successfully adopt new strategies to manage water not only for humans, but to maintain all aspects of the environment. This particularly applies to drylands regions where resources are already limited and conflicts over water are occurring. Every aspect of the hydrologic cycle needs to be assessed to be able to quantify the available water resources, to monitor natural and anthropogenic changes, and to develop flexible policies and management strategies that can change as conditions dictate. Optimal, sustainable water management is achieved by cooperation and not conflict, thereby necessitating the need for high quality scientific research and input into the process. View Full-Text
Keywords: dryland water resources; managed aquifer recharge; monitoring water resources development; irrigated agriculture; water policies; remote sensing of water resources dryland water resources; managed aquifer recharge; monitoring water resources development; irrigated agriculture; water policies; remote sensing of water resources
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Koch, M.; Missimer, T.M. Water Resources Assessment and Management in Drylands. Water 2016, 8, 239.

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