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Micromachines 2018, 9(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi9010027

Fabrication of a Lab-on-Chip Device Using Material Extrusion (3D Printing) and Demonstration via Malaria-Ab ELISA

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA
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Received: 13 December 2017 / Revised: 7 January 2018 / Accepted: 11 January 2018 / Published: 14 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Additive Manufacturing for Medical Applications)
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Abstract

Additive manufacturing, such as fused deposition modeling (FDM), has been increasingly employed to produce microfluidic platforms due to ease of use, wide distribution of affordable 3D printers and relatively inexpensive materials for printing. In this work, we discuss fabrication and testing of an FDM-printed fully automated colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) designed to detect malaria. The detection platform consists of a disposable 3D-printed fluidic cartridge (with elastomeric silicone domes on top of reagent-storage reservoirs) and a nondisposable frame with servomotors and electronic controls such as an Arduino board and a rechargeable battery. The system is controlled by a novel interface where a music file (so-called “song”) is sent to the Arduino board, where the onboard program converts the set of frequencies into action of individual servomotors to rotate their arms a certain amount, thus depressing specific elastomeric domes atop reagent reservoirs and displacing the specific reagents into the detection wells, where bioassay steps are executed. Another of the distinguished characteristics of the demonstrated system is its ability to aspirate the fluid from the detection wells into the waste reservoir. Therefore, the demonstrated automated platform has the ability to execute even the most complex multi-step assays where dilution and multiple washes are required. Optimization of 3D-printer settings and ways to control leakages typical of FDM-printed fluidic systems are also discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D printing; fused deposition modeling (FDM); material extrusion; leakage control; malaria; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); extreme point of care 3D printing; fused deposition modeling (FDM); material extrusion; leakage control; malaria; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); extreme point of care
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Bauer, M.; Kulinsky, L. Fabrication of a Lab-on-Chip Device Using Material Extrusion (3D Printing) and Demonstration via Malaria-Ab ELISA. Micromachines 2018, 9, 27.

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