Next Article in Journal
Selected Activities of Citrus Maxima Merr. Fruits on Human Endothelial Cells: Enhancing Cell Migration and Delaying Cellular Aging
Next Article in Special Issue
High Plasma Homocysteine Increases Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in 6 to 8 Year Old Children in Rural Nepal
Previous Article in Journal
Nativity and Serum Concentrations of Antioxidants in Mexican American Children: A Cross-Sectional Study
Previous Article in Special Issue
Dietary Patterns in Children with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
Nutrients 2014, 6(4), 1608-1617; doi:10.3390/nu6041608
Article

Associations between Infant Feeding Practice Prior to Six Months and Body Mass Index at Six Years of Age

1,2,* , 1,2
, 1,2
, 1,2
 and 1,2
Received: 16 January 2014; in revised form: 10 March 2014 / Accepted: 2 April 2014 / Published: 17 April 2014
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Paediatric Nutrition)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [200 KB, uploaded 17 April 2014]
Abstract: Rapid growth during infancy is associated with increased risk of overweight and obesity and differences in weight gain are at least partly explained by means of infant feeding. The aim was to assess the associations between infant feeding practice in early infancy and body mass index (BMI) at 6 years of age. Icelandic infants (n = 154) were prospectively followed from birth to 12 months and again at age 6 years. Birth weight and length were gathered from maternity wards, and healthcare centers provided the measurements made during infancy up to 18 months of age. Information on breastfeeding practices was documented 0–12 months and a 24-h dietary record was collected at 5 months. Changes in infant weight gain were calculated from birth to 18 months. Linear regression analyses were performed to examine associations between infant feeding practice at 5 months and body mass index (BMI) at 6 years. Infants who were formula-fed at 5 months of age grew faster, particularly between 2 and 6 months, compared to exclusively breastfed infants. At age 6 years, BMI was on average 1.1 kg/m2 (95% CI 0.2, 2.0) higher among infants who were formula fed and also receiving solid foods at 5 months of age compared to those exclusively breastfed. In a high-income country such as Iceland, early introduction of solid foods seems to further increase the risk of high childhood BMI among formula fed infants compared with exclusively breastfed infants, although further studies with greater power are needed.
Keywords: MeSH terms; growth; infant; breastfeeding; weaning; overweight; child MeSH terms; growth; infant; breastfeeding; weaning; overweight; child
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Export to BibTeX |
EndNote


MDPI and ACS Style

Imai, C.M.; Gunnarsdottir, I.; Thorisdottir, B.; Halldorsson, T.I.; Thorsdottir, I. Associations between Infant Feeding Practice Prior to Six Months and Body Mass Index at Six Years of Age. Nutrients 2014, 6, 1608-1617.

AMA Style

Imai CM, Gunnarsdottir I, Thorisdottir B, Halldorsson TI, Thorsdottir I. Associations between Infant Feeding Practice Prior to Six Months and Body Mass Index at Six Years of Age. Nutrients. 2014; 6(4):1608-1617.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Imai, Cindy M.; Gunnarsdottir, Ingibjorg; Thorisdottir, Birna; Halldorsson, Thorhallur I.; Thorsdottir, Inga. 2014. "Associations between Infant Feeding Practice Prior to Six Months and Body Mass Index at Six Years of Age." Nutrients 6, no. 4: 1608-1617.


Nutrients EISSN 2072-6643 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert