Nutrients 2013, 5(3), 981-1001; doi:10.3390/nu5030981
Article

Hypertriglyceridemia

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Received: 22 January 2013; in revised form: 14 March 2013 / Accepted: 15 March 2013 / Published: 22 March 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dyslipidemia and Obesity)
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Abstract: Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is commonly encountered in lipid and cardiology clinics. Severe HTG warrants treatment because of the associated increased risk of acute pancreatitis. However, the need to treat, and the correct treatment approach for patients with mild to moderate HTG are issues for ongoing evaluation. In the past, it was felt that triglyceride does not directly contribute to development of atherosclerotic plaques. However, this view is evolving, especially for triglyceride-related fractions and variables measured in the non-fasting state. Our understanding of the etiology, genetics and classification of HTG states is also evolving. Previously, HTG was considered to be a dominant disorder associated with variation within a single gene. The old nomenclature includes the term “familial” in the names of several hyperlipoproteinemia (HLP) phenotypes that included HTG as part of their profile, including combined hyperlipidemia (HLP type 2B), dysbetalipoproteinemia (HLP type 3), simple HTG (HLP type 4) and mixed hyperlipidemia (HLP type 5). This old thinking has given way to the idea that genetic susceptibility to HTG results from cumulative effects of multiple genetic variants acting in concert. HTG most is often a “polygenic” or “multigenic” trait. However, a few rare autosomal recessive forms of severe HTG have been defined. Treatment depends on the overall clinical context, including severity of HTG, concomitant presence of other lipid disturbances, and the patient's global risk of cardiovascular disease. Therapeutic strategies include dietary counselling, lifestyle management, control of secondary factors, use of omega-3 preparations and selective use of pharmaceutical agents.
Keywords: dyslipidemia; polygenic; complex trait; mutation; single nucleotide polymorphism
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brahm, A.; Hegele, R.A. Hypertriglyceridemia. Nutrients 2013, 5, 981-1001.

AMA Style

Brahm A, Hegele RA. Hypertriglyceridemia. Nutrients. 2013; 5(3):981-1001.

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brahm, Amanda; Hegele, Robert A. 2013. "Hypertriglyceridemia." Nutrients 5, no. 3: 981-1001.

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