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Future Internet, Volume 7, Issue 1 (March 2015), Pages 1-93

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Future Internet in 2014
Future Internet 2015, 7(1), 24-25; doi:10.3390/fi7010024
Received: 9 January 2015 / Accepted: 9 January 2015 / Published: 9 January 2015
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Abstract
The editors of Future Internet would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2014:[...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Geographic Ontologies, Gazetteers and Multilingualism
Future Internet 2015, 7(1), 1-23; doi:10.3390/fi7010001
Received: 31 August 2014 / Accepted: 1 December 2014 / Published: 5 January 2015
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Abstract
Different languages imply different visions of space, so that terminologies are different in geographic ontologies. In addition to their geometric shapes, geographic features have names, sometimes different in diverse languages. In addition, the role of gazetteers, as dictionaries of place names (toponyms), is
[...] Read more.
Different languages imply different visions of space, so that terminologies are different in geographic ontologies. In addition to their geometric shapes, geographic features have names, sometimes different in diverse languages. In addition, the role of gazetteers, as dictionaries of place names (toponyms), is to maintain relations between place names and location. The scope of geographic information retrieval is to search for geographic information not against a database, but against the whole Internet: but the Internet stores information in different languages, and it is of paramount importance not to remain stuck to a unique language. In this paper, our first step is to clarify the links between geographic objects as computer representations of geographic features, ontologies and gazetteers designed in various languages. Then, we propose some inference rules for matching not only types, but also relations in geographic ontologies with the assistance of gazetteers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Semantic Geographic Information System (Semantic GIS))
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Open AccessArticle Aspects to Be Considered when Implementing Technology-Enhanced Learning Approaches: A Literature Review
Future Internet 2015, 7(1), 26-49; doi:10.3390/fi7010026
Received: 8 October 2014 / Revised: 18 December 2014 / Accepted: 7 January 2015 / Published: 3 February 2015
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Abstract
The significance of approaches to technology-enhanced learning (TEL) has increased rapidly during the last few years. Nowadays in education different approaches such as game-based learning, web-based learning, video-based online courses, and many others are used on a daily basis. However, what defines the
[...] Read more.
The significance of approaches to technology-enhanced learning (TEL) has increased rapidly during the last few years. Nowadays in education different approaches such as game-based learning, web-based learning, video-based online courses, and many others are used on a daily basis. However, what defines the success of technology-enhanced learning approaches and how can such approaches be developed in a structured way? Furthermore, what different aspects have to be considered while doing so? To answer these questions, 4567 publications were analyzed in this present literature review in order to recognize the different aspects of implementing technology-enhanced learning approaches. Finally, 20 categories are defined in four main areas that summarize all the aspects in the field of technology-enhanced learning. Moreover, the study also reveals research areas that are important but hardly investigated in the observed journals of this study. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Participatory Design to Enhance ICT Learning and Community Attachment: A Case Study in Rural Taiwan
Future Internet 2015, 7(1), 50-66; doi:10.3390/fi7010050
Received: 30 July 2014 / Revised: 23 December 2014 / Accepted: 26 January 2015 / Published: 2 March 2015
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Abstract
This study used observation and interviews with participants in “PunCar Action” to understand how participatory design methods can be applied to the education of rural individuals in information and communication technology (ICT). PunCar Action is a volunteer program in which ICT educators tour
[...] Read more.
This study used observation and interviews with participants in “PunCar Action” to understand how participatory design methods can be applied to the education of rural individuals in information and communication technology (ICT). PunCar Action is a volunteer program in which ICT educators tour the rural communities of Taiwan, offering courses on the use of digital technology. This paper makes three contributions: First, we found that participatory design is an excellent way to teach ICT and Web 2.0 skills, co-create community blogs, and sustain intrinsic motivation to use Web applications. Second, PunCar Action provides an innovative bottom-up intergenerational ICT education model with high penetrability capable of enhancing the confidence of rural residents in the use of ICT. Third, the content of basic courses was based on applications capable of making the lives of elderly individuals more convenient, and the advanced course was based on the co-creation of community blogs aimed at reviving the core functions of communities and expanding local industry. Our research was conducted with the use of a non-quantitative index to measure ICT learning performance of participants from a rural community. The results show that PunCar Action emphasizes interpersonal communication and informational applications and creates a collaborative process that encourages rural residents to take action to close the digital divide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Inequalities)
Open AccessArticle Social Networking Privacy—Who’s Stalking You?
Future Internet 2015, 7(1), 67-93; doi:10.3390/fi7010067
Received: 25 August 2014 / Revised: 9 February 2015 / Accepted: 13 March 2015 / Published: 23 March 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (13372 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This research investigates the privacy issues that exist on social networking sites. It is reasonable to assume that many Twitter users are unaware of the dangers of uploading a tweet to their timeline which can be seen by anyone. Enabling geo-location tagging on
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This research investigates the privacy issues that exist on social networking sites. It is reasonable to assume that many Twitter users are unaware of the dangers of uploading a tweet to their timeline which can be seen by anyone. Enabling geo-location tagging on tweets can result in personal information leakage, which the user did not intend to be public and which can seriously affect that user’s privacy and anonymity online. This research demonstrates that key information can easily be retrieved using the starting point of a single tweet with geo-location turned on. A series of experiments have been undertaken to determine how much information can be obtained about a particular individual using only social networking sites and freely available mining tools. The information gathered enabled the target subjects to be identified on other social networking sites such as Foursquare, Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook and Google+, where more personal information was leaked. The tools used are discussed, the results of the experiments are presented and the privacy implications are examined. Full article
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