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Molecules 2016, 21(10), 1370; doi:10.3390/molecules21101370

Enzyme Engineering for In Situ Immobilization

Institute of Fundamental Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North 4442, New Zealand
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Academic Editor: Roberto Fernandez-Lafuente
Received: 30 August 2016 / Revised: 5 October 2016 / Accepted: 5 October 2016 / Published: 14 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Enzyme Immobilization 2016)
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Abstract

Enzymes are used as biocatalysts in a vast range of industrial applications. Immobilization of enzymes to solid supports or their self-assembly into insoluble particles enhances their applicability by strongly improving properties such as stability in changing environments, re-usability and applicability in continuous biocatalytic processes. The possibility of co-immobilizing various functionally related enzymes involved in multistep synthesis, conversion or degradation reactions enables the design of multifunctional biocatalyst with enhanced performance compared to their soluble counterparts. This review provides a brief overview of up-to-date in vitro immobilization strategies while focusing on recent advances in enzyme engineering towards in situ self-assembly into insoluble particles. In situ self-assembly approaches include the bioengineering of bacteria to abundantly form enzymatically active inclusion bodies such as enzyme inclusions or enzyme-coated polyhydroxyalkanoate granules. These one-step production strategies for immobilized enzymes avoid prefabrication of the carrier as well as chemical cross-linking or attachment to a support material while the controlled oriented display strongly enhances the fraction of accessible catalytic sites and hence functional enzymes. View Full-Text
Keywords: enzyme; biocatalyst; immobilization; self-assembly; inclusion bodies; protein particles; recombinant enzyme enzyme; biocatalyst; immobilization; self-assembly; inclusion bodies; protein particles; recombinant enzyme
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Rehm, F.B.H.; Chen, S.; Rehm, B.H.A. Enzyme Engineering for In Situ Immobilization. Molecules 2016, 21, 1370.

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