Special Issue "Social and Personal Relationships"

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A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Steve Duck (Website)

Department of Communication Studies, University of Iowa, 151 Becker Communication Studies Building, Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1498, USA
Interests: social and personal relationship processes; Kelly's personal construct theory

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Social Sciences will begin accepting manuscripts for a special issue on "Social and Personal Relationships", which will deal with all aspects of the development, conduct and dissolution of all kinds of relationships and interpersonal interaction. Papers are invited on romantic relationships, marriage, friendship all across the life span, and everyday interpersonal interaction, whether the relationship is the dependent or independent variable or the topic of qualitative study of everyday communication. All papers will be carefully reviewed by experts and successful papers will be published online in Social Science http://www.mdpi.com/journal/socsci with a starting date of November 2013.

Professor Steve Duck
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • social and personal relationships
  • marriage
  • friendship
  • dissolution
  • enemies
  • family
  • interpersonal interaction
  • divorce
  • social support
  • networks

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Sexual Motivations and Ideals Distinguish Sexual Identities within the Self-Concept: A Multidimensional Scaling Analysis
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(2), 215-226; doi:10.3390/socsci3020215
Received: 2 December 2013 / Revised: 5 April 2014 / Accepted: 11 April 2014 / Published: 22 April 2014
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Abstract
Many studies explore when and how young people make sexual choices but few empirical investigations link their sexual motivations with their inner conceptions about their sexual identities. We used multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis to connect young adult participants’ (N = 128) self-descriptions [...] Read more.
Many studies explore when and how young people make sexual choices but few empirical investigations link their sexual motivations with their inner conceptions about their sexual identities. We used multidimensional scaling (MDS) analysis to connect young adult participants’ (N = 128) self-descriptions of twelve identities to their sexual motivations and ideals. Identities clustered along two semantically distinct dimensions: Dimension 1 was anchored by family identities on one side and non-family identities on the other; Dimension 2 was anchored on one side by friend/romantic relationships and achievement-based social identities on the other. Those who cited intimacy (e.g., sex as an expression of love) and enhancement (e.g., gratification; to feel good) sexual motivations were more likely to describe their sexual identities and gender identities as distinct from other identities, especially for women. Idealizing physically passionate relationships was positively linked to a higher distinction between sexual and non-sexual identities, and between gender and personal identities and family identities. The mental structuring of identities may inform sexual relationship motives, ideals, and expectations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Personal Relationships)
Open AccessArticle Stanley Milgram’s Obedience to Authority “Relationship” Condition: Some Methodological and Theoretical Implications
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(2), 194-214; doi:10.3390/socsci3020194
Received: 28 January 2014 / Revised: 31 March 2014 / Accepted: 9 April 2014 / Published: 15 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (145 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In May 1962, social psychologist, Stanley Milgram, ran what was arguably the most controversial variation of his Obedience to Authority (OTA) experiments: the Relationship Condition (RC). In the RC, participants were required to bring a friend, with one becoming the teacher and [...] Read more.
In May 1962, social psychologist, Stanley Milgram, ran what was arguably the most controversial variation of his Obedience to Authority (OTA) experiments: the Relationship Condition (RC). In the RC, participants were required to bring a friend, with one becoming the teacher and the other the learner. The learners were covertly informed that the experiment was actually exploring whether their friend would obey an experimenter’s orders to hurt them. Learners were quickly trained in how to react to the impending “shocks”. Only 15 percent of teachers completed the RC. In an article published in 1965, Milgram discussed most of the variations on his baseline experiment, but only named the RC in passing, promising a more detailed account in his forthcoming book. However, his 1974 book failed to mention the RC and it remained unpublished until François Rochat and Andre Modigliani discovered it in Milgram’s personal archive in 1997 at Yale University. Their overview of the RC’s procedure and results left a number of questions unanswered. For example, what were the etiological origins of the RC? Why did Milgram decide against publishing this experiment? And does the RC have any significant methodological or theoretical implications on the Obedience studies discourse? Based on documents obtained from Milgram’s personal archive, the aim of this article is to shed new light on these questions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Personal Relationships)
Open AccessArticle Peer Influence and Attraction to Interracial Romantic Relationships
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(1), 115-127; doi:10.3390/socsci3010115
Received: 27 November 2013 / Revised: 14 January 2014 / Accepted: 6 February 2014 / Published: 19 February 2014
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Abstract
The present research examined the effect of social influence on White, heterosexual individuals’ attraction to targets of varying races (White vs. Black) in two  college student samples from the United States (one that leaned politically liberal and one that leaned politically conservative). [...] Read more.
The present research examined the effect of social influence on White, heterosexual individuals’ attraction to targets of varying races (White vs. Black) in two  college student samples from the United States (one that leaned politically liberal and one that leaned politically conservative). Using a within-subjects experimental design, participants were given artificial peer evaluation data (positive, negative, or none) before providing ratings of attractiveness and dating interest for a series of targets. In both samples, positive information was associated with greater levels of attraction and dating interest than negative information, regardless of target race. Within the conservative sample, participants reported greater attraction toward and more dating interest in White targets relative to Black targets, while in the liberal sample, participants’ ratings of targets did not significantly differ from one another. These findings suggest that social influence can affect perceptions of attractiveness even in very different political climates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Personal Relationships)
Open AccessArticle An Instrument to Investigate Expectations about and Experiences of the Parent-Child Relationship: The Parent-Child Relationship Schema Scale
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(1), 84-114; doi:10.3390/socsci3010084
Received: 1 December 2013 / Revised: 30 January 2014 / Accepted: 10 February 2014 / Published: 18 February 2014
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Abstract
This paper explains the reasons for and process of creating and testing for reliability and constructing the validity of the Parent-Child Relationship Schema Scale (PCRSS). The instrument is based on the Model of Relationships Survey (MRS). However, where the MRS is an [...] Read more.
This paper explains the reasons for and process of creating and testing for reliability and constructing the validity of the Parent-Child Relationship Schema Scale (PCRSS). The instrument is based on the Model of Relationships Survey (MRS). However, where the MRS is an open-ended survey which takes 20–30 minutes to complete and longer to analyze, the PCRSS is a Likert scale survey which can be completed in less than half the time and offers more sophisticated analysis possibilities as well as new research opportunities. The paper explains the three-stage process used to create the PCRSS and the five tests of reliability and concurrent validity that it “passed”. We also discuss the potential for new areas of research about the parent-child relationship with the PCRSS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Personal Relationships)
Open AccessArticle Coping with Break-Ups: Rebound Relationships and Gender Socialization
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(1), 24-43; doi:10.3390/socsci3010024
Received: 27 November 2013 / Revised: 18 January 2014 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 27 January 2014
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Abstract
When serious romantic relationships are terminated, partners are faced with convoluted and complex challenges of detachment from their previous partner, negative feelings about the overall situation, and the need to move forward in life. When faced with this relational upheaval, some individuals [...] Read more.
When serious romantic relationships are terminated, partners are faced with convoluted and complex challenges of detachment from their previous partner, negative feelings about the overall situation, and the need to move forward in life. When faced with this relational upheaval, some individuals employ and find relief in superficial or noncommittal rebound relationships, which act as a means for coping with the loss of the previous relationship and the severed emotional attachment to an ex-partner, but which are under studied by empirical researchers. In a study of 201 participants, men were predicted and found to be more likely to enter rebound relationships in the aftermath of a relational termination based on lower levels of social support, more emotional attachment to an ex-partner, and displaying the ludus (or game playing) love style. In addition to the measures of these variables, gender socialization and parental investment theory provide further support for the study’s claims. In sum, rebound relationships were employed by men as a distraction from their feelings of emotional attachment for their ex-partner, but also as a source of support and due to inherent ludic characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Personal Relationships)

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessProject Report Intercorrelations of Intimacy and Identity Dating Goals with Relationship Behaviors and Satisfaction among Young Heterosexual Couples
Soc. Sci. 2014, 3(1), 44-59; doi:10.3390/socsci3010044
Received: 26 November 2013 / Revised: 20 January 2014 / Accepted: 22 January 2014 / Published: 29 January 2014
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Abstract
Goals indicate what individuals are working towards in their present lives and what they want to achieve or avoid. In this study of 87 young, unmarried couples (age 17 to 25 years), intimacy and identity dating goals were assessed to investigate couple [...] Read more.
Goals indicate what individuals are working towards in their present lives and what they want to achieve or avoid. In this study of 87 young, unmarried couples (age 17 to 25 years), intimacy and identity dating goals were assessed to investigate couple similarity in goals, associations between personal goals and relationship behaviors, and whether goals and behavior were associated with relationship satisfaction. Couples were similar in their intimacy goals but not their identity goals. As expected, intimacy goals were associated with behaviors when reported by the partner, including greater warmth, autonomy support and structure, and less rejection. One’s own intimacy goals and the positive behaviors of one’s partner, but not one’s own identity goals or the goals of the partner, were uniquely associated with relationship satisfaction. The findings suggest that individual differences in dating goals are relevant to understanding how young people behave with their partners, and why some individuals are more or less satisfied with their relationships. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social and Personal Relationships)

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