Special Issue "International Migration and Innovation: Implications for Human Development"

A special issue of Societies (ISSN 2075-4698).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Rosalyn Negrón

University of Massachusetts, Boston, United States
Website | E-Mail
Interests: diversity and social interaction; ethnic identity development; immigration and transnationalism; diversity in STEM; health disparities

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

International migration is a key driver of social change in both sending and receiving countries. In an intensely global age, the products of migration-driven social change are ubiquitous. Our global cities are ones in which cultural, linguistic, and economic contact among immigrants and the native-born has led to the development of inventive practices, products and social formations. From Afro-Celt music, to Spanglish, to immigrant entrepreneur led tech firms like Google, innovation inevitably follows the cross-border movement of people. Innovation is a key mechanism by which international migration enhances human development.

This Special Issue will provide an interdisciplinary forum for scholars to explore the relationship between international migration and innovation. Innovation is defined as the novel application of ideas and practices that contribute to positive change in an environment. Given the role that innovation plays in economic competitiveness and growth, the term has special relevance in the fields of economic development, organizational studies, and product development. Here, we focus on the consequences of international migration and innovation for human development (e.g. health, education, opportunity, flourishing). Among the questions to explore in this issue are:

•    In what ways has migration-driven innovation improved people’s well-being and their ability to lead creative and productive lives?
•    What current innovative practices, processes, social arrangements, and artistic forms can be traced to immigrants or immigrant communities?
•    Under what conditions does international migration contribute to innovation in sending and receiving societies?
•    What role can public policy play in enhancing the human development potential of migration-driven innovation?
•    Who are the actors that drive innovation in the context of international migration?

Dr. Rosalyn Negrón
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Societies is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle ‘Is It Entrepreneurship, or Is It Survival?’: Gender, Community, and Innovation in Boston’s Black Immigrant Micro-Enterprise Spaces
Societies 2017, 7(3), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc7030020
Received: 12 June 2017 / Revised: 29 July 2017 / Accepted: 10 August 2017 / Published: 30 August 2017
PDF Full-text (250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Micro-enterprises are typically classified as businesses with fewer than six employees and very small amounts of financial capital. Focusing on black immigrant women’s micro-entrepreneurial ventures in Boston, this paper explores how non-economic forms of capital are crucial to the survival of micro-enterprise, in
[...] Read more.
Micro-enterprises are typically classified as businesses with fewer than six employees and very small amounts of financial capital. Focusing on black immigrant women’s micro-entrepreneurial ventures in Boston, this paper explores how non-economic forms of capital are crucial to the survival of micro-enterprise, in large part because of customer choices to patronize businesses they trust and to support proprietors whose identities and values they share. The richness of social and cultural capital and local information—controlled by minority immigrant women micro-entrepreneurs—can easily go undetected by mainstream lenders, training programs, and policy-makers. Other features that go unnoticed include the fact that the proprietors and patrons of micro-enterprises can often be highly skilled and educated and that innovative business moves are often embodied in already-existing processes of reciprocity and exchange. With implications for how funding can be infused into communities deeply connected to informal economy processes in U.S. cities, the paper argues for support for community-based processes of local development, economic growth, and social justice that are rooted in the communities that need them. Full article
Open AccessArticle Out and Asian: How Undocu/DACAmented Asian Americans and Pacific Islander Youth Navigate Dual Liminality in the Immigrant Rights Movement
Societies 2017, 7(3), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/soc7030017
Received: 16 May 2017 / Revised: 19 June 2017 / Accepted: 20 June 2017 / Published: 30 June 2017
PDF Full-text (634 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) represent the fastest-growing racial category in the U.S., largely due to its increasing immigration from the Asia-Pacific region (AAJC 2015). Of the 10.9 million undocumented immigrants residing in the U.S., 14% (1.5 million) are from Asia (Migration
[...] Read more.
Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) represent the fastest-growing racial category in the U.S., largely due to its increasing immigration from the Asia-Pacific region (AAJC 2015). Of the 10.9 million undocumented immigrants residing in the U.S., 14% (1.5 million) are from Asia (Migration Policy Institute 2014). In response to immigrant youth organizing, President Barack Obama initiated the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in 2012, which offers temporary relief from deportation to approximately 2 million undocumented childhood arrivals (Ibid). Yet, the unique perspectives of AAPI youth have gone unheard, and their political activities have been rendered invisible in public discourse on undocu/DACAmented youth in the immigrant rights movement. This study aims to capture political identity formation through what I coin “dual liminality” that leads to political participation for undocu/DACAmented AAPI youth. It considers how their status as undocumented or DACA, as being marginalized from both mainstream and co-ethnic claims to belonging, helped them form a collective political identity and engage in political activities. The use of strategic storytelling (Polletta 2006) throughout the process of their political development also led to their return to organize co-ethnic communities against internalized stereotypes of both “Model Minority” and “Yellow Peril”. This study involves 12 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with politically active AAPI, ages 20–26, from four major cities on the East Coast, conducted between 2014 and 2015. The interviews demonstrate how these youths’ choices to reveal their status shape their collective identity formation that leads to their political engagement. Through strategic storytelling, they use their dual liminality to shape their narrative framing in both the immigrant rights and in AAPI communities, enhancing their political participation across inter-racial boundaries. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top