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Special Issue "Wireless Pressure Sensors"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2009)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Chelakara S. Subramanian (Website)

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Boulevard, Melbourne, FL 32901, USA
Fax: +1 321 674 8813
Interests: wireless pressure sensors; RF strain and temperature sensors; optical sensors; LDV; PIV; photoluminescence sensors; batteryless micro-sensors; hot-wire anemometry; infra-red oxygen sensors

Special Issue Information

Pressure sensing is one of the most common measurements in fluid dynamics, hydraulics, meteorology, chemical processes and biomedical science. Wireless pressure sensing is becoming attractive because of less wiring, improved signal-to-noise ratio, sensor miniaturization and circuit integration, multi-point sensing and ease of networking. Research articles are solicited for a special issue of Wireless Pressure Sensors journal which will provide a consolidated state-of-the-art in this area. The Special Issue of "Wireless Pressure Sensors” will publish those full research, review and high rated manuscripts addressing the above topic.

Keywords

  • wireless sensors
  • pressure transducers
  • sensor network
  • multi-point sensing
  • non-contact pressure sensing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries
Sensors 2009, 9(1), 404-429; doi:10.3390/s90100404
Received: 4 November 2008 / Revised: 4 January 2009 / Accepted: 5 January 2009 / Published: 9 January 2009
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (652 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry system provides data on shore in real time if desired. The [...] Read more.
An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry system provides data on shore in real time if desired. The immediate purpose of measurements by this device is to continuously infer fluxes of water across the sediment-water interface in a complex estuarine system; however, direct application to assessment of sediment-water fluxes in rivers, lakes, and other systems is also possible. Key objectives of the design include both low cost, and accuracy of the order of ±0.5 mm H2O in measured head difference between the instrument’s two pressure ports. These objectives have been met, although a revision to the design of one component was found to be necessary. Deployments of up to nine months, and wireless range in excess of 300 m have been demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Pressure Sensors)
Open AccessArticle Planar Pressure Field Determination in the Initial Merging Zone of an Annular Swirling Jet Based on Stereo-PIV Measurements
Sensors 2008, 8(12), 7596-7608; doi:10.3390/s8127596
Received: 31 October 2008 / Revised: 17 November 2008 / Accepted: 26 November 2008 / Published: 28 November 2008
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (3143 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper the static pressure field of an annular swirling jet is measured indirectly using stereo-PIV measurements. The pressure field is obtained from numerically solving the Poisson equation, taken into account the axisymmetry of the flow. At the boundaries no assumptions [...] Read more.
In this paper the static pressure field of an annular swirling jet is measured indirectly using stereo-PIV measurements. The pressure field is obtained from numerically solving the Poisson equation, taken into account the axisymmetry of the flow. At the boundaries no assumptions are made and the exact boundary conditions are applied. Since all source terms can be measured using stereo-PIV and the boundary conditions are exact, no assumptions other than axisymmetry had to be made in the calculation of the pressure field. The advantage of this method of indirect pressure measurement is its high spatial resolution compared to the traditional pitot probes. Moreover this method is non-intrusive while the insertion of a pitot tube disturbs the flow. It is shown that the annular swirling flow can be divided into three regimes: a low, an intermediate and a high swirling regime. The pressure field of the low swirling regime is the superposition of the pressure field of the non-swirling jet and a swirl induced pressure field due to the centrifugal forces of the rotating jet. As the swirl increases, the swirl induced pressure field becomes dominant and for the intermediate and high swirling regimes, the simple radial equilibrium equation holds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Pressure Sensors)
Open AccessArticle A Micromachined Capacitive Pressure Sensor Using a Cavity-Less Structure with Bulk-Metal/Elastomer Layers and Its Wireless Telemetry Application
Sensors 2008, 8(4), 2317-2330; doi:10.3390/s8042317
Received: 31 December 2007 / Accepted: 31 March 2008 / Published: 2 April 2008
Cited by 17 | PDF Full-text (481 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reports a micromachined capacitive pressure sensor intended for applications that require mechanical robustness. The device is constructed with two micromachined metal plates and an intermediate polymer layer that is soft enough to deform in a target pressure range. The plates [...] Read more.
This paper reports a micromachined capacitive pressure sensor intended for applications that require mechanical robustness. The device is constructed with two micromachined metal plates and an intermediate polymer layer that is soft enough to deform in a target pressure range. The plates are formed of micromachined stainless steel fabricated by batch-compatible micro-electro-discharge machining. A polyurethane roomtemperature- vulcanizing liquid rubber of 38-μm thickness is used as the deformable material. This structure eliminates both the vacuum cavity and the associated lead transfer challenges common to micromachined capacitive pressure sensors. For frequency-based interrogation of the capacitance, passive inductor-capacitor tanks are fabricated by combining the capacitive sensor with an inductive coil. The coil has 40 turns of a 127-μmdiameter copper wire. Wireless sensing is demonstrated in liquid by monitoring the variation in the resonant frequency of the tank via an external coil that is magnetically coupled with the tank. The sensitivity at room temperature is measured to be 23-33 ppm/KPa over a dynamic range of 340 KPa, which is shown to match a theoretical estimation. Temperature dependence of the tank is experimentally evaluated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wireless Pressure Sensors)

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