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Special Issue "Biosensors for Point-of-Care Applications"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Biosensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2008)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. I-Ming Hsing

Head and Professor, Division of Biomedical Engineering, Professor, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Room 2004A, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +852 31064857
Interests: biosensors; bioMEMS; biomicrosystem; electrochemistry-based detection of biomacromolecules and fuel cells (PEFC, DMFC and Micro Fuel Cell)

Special Issue Information

Biosensors and bioanalytical devices that are able to provide accurate detection of target analytes have always been important in the fields of medical diagnostics, food testing and environmental monitoring. Many of the available diagnostic and detection platform technologies require the operation of bulky instruments by well-trained staff and it often takes days to complete a single testing. Over the years, there are increasing needs for the development of portable, integrated biosensors that can be operated outside the laboratory by untrained personnel. These devices, once developed, will have a major impact on the applications of personal care, health, food, and environment monitoring.

Until now, other than glucose sensors and pregnancy testing strips, very few biosensors have demonstrated their success in large scale and long term operations. Encouragingly, in recent years, because of the improved understanding in genomics and proteomics and the advances in techniques of microfabrication and instrumentation, many interesting and innovative concepts and prototypes for integrated and automated bioanalytical systems have been reported.

This special issue entitled "Biosensors for Point of Care Applications" is intended to be a timely and comprehensive report on new emerging technologies that are currently being developed by research laboratories world-wide on biosensors and biomicrodevices (e.g. DNA sensor, protein sensor, glucose sensor, immunosensor, biochip, bioMEMS) with emphasis on, but limited to, point of care and point of use applications. Research papers, short communications and reviews are all welcome. In case the author is interested in submitting a review, it would be helpful to discuss with the guest-editor before your submission.

Keywords

  • Biosensors
  • Biomicrosystem
  • Biochips
  • Biodetection
  • Point of Care
  • DNA
  • Protein

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Fabrication of a Novel Conductometric Biosensor for Detecting Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Antibodies
Sensors 2008, 8(9), 6015-6025; doi:10.3390/s8096015
Received: 2 September 2008 / Revised: 18 September 2008 / Accepted: 22 September 2008 / Published: 26 September 2008
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (89 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Johne’s disease (JD) is one of the most costly bacterial diseases in cattle. In the U.S., economic losses from the disease have been estimated to exceed $1,500,000,000 per year, mainly from the effects of reduced milk production. Current diagnostic tests for JD are
[...] Read more.
Johne’s disease (JD) is one of the most costly bacterial diseases in cattle. In the U.S., economic losses from the disease have been estimated to exceed $1,500,000,000 per year, mainly from the effects of reduced milk production. Current diagnostic tests for JD are laboratory based and many of those tests require specialized equipment and training. Development of rapid and inexpensive diagnostic assays, which are adapted for point-ofcare applications, would aid in the control of JD. In this study, a polyaniline (Pani)-based conductometric biosensor, in an immunomigration format, was fabricated for the detection of serum antibody (IgG) against the causal organism of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Immobilized Mycobacterium avium purified proteins in the capture membrane were used to detect MAP IgG, previously bound with Pani/anti-bovine IgG* conjugate in the conjugate membrane. After detection, the Pani in the sandwiched captured complex bridges an electrical circuit between the silver electrodes, flanking the capture membrane. The electrical conductance, caused by Pani, was measured as drop in electrical resistance. Testing of the biosensor with known JD positive and negative serum samples demonstrated a significant difference in the mean resistance observed between the groups. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that a conductometric biosensor could detect MAP IgG in 2 minutes. The biosensor’s speed of detection and the equipment involved would, among other things, support its application towards the various point-ofcare opportunities aimed at JD management and control. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Point-of-Care Applications)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Over-the-Counter Biosensors: Past, Present, and Future
Sensors 2008, 8(9), 5535-5559; doi:10.3390/s8095535
Received: 19 August 2008 / Revised: 28 August 2008 / Accepted: 3 September 2008 / Published: 6 September 2008
Cited by 58 | PDF Full-text (595 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The demand for specific, low cost, rapid, sensitive and easy detection of biomolecules is huge. A well-known example is the glucose meters used by diabetics to monitor their blood glucose levels. Nowadays, a vast majority of the glucose meters are based on electrochemical
[...] Read more.
The demand for specific, low cost, rapid, sensitive and easy detection of biomolecules is huge. A well-known example is the glucose meters used by diabetics to monitor their blood glucose levels. Nowadays, a vast majority of the glucose meters are based on electrochemical biosensor technology. The inherent small size and simple construction of the electrochemical transducer and instrument are ideally suited for pointof-care biosensing. Besides glucose, a wide variety of electrochemical biosensors have been developed for the measurements of some other key metabolites, proteins, and nucleic acids. Nevertheless, unlike the glucose meters, limited success has been achieved for the commercialization of the protein and nucleic acid biosensors. In this review article, key technologies on the electrochemical detection of key metabolites, proteins, and DNAs are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on those that are compatible to home-use setting. Moreover, emerging technologies of lab-on-a-chip microdevices and nanosensors (i.e., silicon and carbon nanotube field-effect sensors) offer opportunities for the construction of new generation biosensors with much better performances. Together with the continuous innovations in the basic components of biosensors (i.e., transducers, biorecognition molecules, immobilization and signal transduction schemes), consumers could soon buy different kinds of biosensing devices in the pharmacy stores. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors for Point-of-Care Applications)

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