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Special Issue "Piezoelectric Sensors for Determination of Analytes in Solutions"

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A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2008)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Wlodzimierz Kutner

Professor of Chemistry, Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +48 22 343 33 33
Interests: electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), piezoelectric chemical sensor, piezoelectric electrochemical sensor, piezosensor, piezoelectric quartz crystal sensor, piezoelectric immunosensor, shear- wave acoustic sensor, thickness-shear-mode acoust

Keywords

electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), piezoelectric chemical sensor, piezoelectric electrochemical sensor, piezosensor, piezoelectric quartz crystal sensor, piezoelectric immunosensor, shear- wave acoustic sensor, thickness-shear-mode acoustic wave sensor, surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor, quartz resonator, selective surface film or coating, piezoelectric microgravimetry, microweighing, quality factor, resonance frequency, film visco-elasticity, dynamic resistance, ion dynamics at the film-solution interface, solid-phase microextraction, interdigitaded (ITD) electronic surface film, continuous electronic surface film, bulk acoustic wave (BAW) sensors, AT-cut quartz crystal, BT-cut quartz, crystal, ST-cut quartz crystal, SC-cut quartz crystal.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Robust Design of SAW Gas Sensors by Taguchi Dynamic Method
Sensors 2009, 9(3), 1394-1408; doi:10.3390/s90301394
Received: 31 December 2008 / Revised: 23 February 2009 / Accepted: 27 February 2009 / Published: 27 February 2009
Cited by 13 | PDF Full-text (451 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper adopts Taguchi’s signal-to-noise ratio analysis to optimize the dynamic characteristics of a SAW gas sensor system whose output response is linearly related to the input signal. The goal of the present dynamic characteristics study is to increase the sensitivity of the
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This paper adopts Taguchi’s signal-to-noise ratio analysis to optimize the dynamic characteristics of a SAW gas sensor system whose output response is linearly related to the input signal. The goal of the present dynamic characteristics study is to increase the sensitivity of the measurement system while simultaneously reducing its variability. A time- and cost-efficient finite element analysis method is utilized to investigate the effects of the deposited mass upon the resonant frequency output of the SAW biosensor. The results show that the proposed methodology not only reduces the design cost but also promotes the performance of the sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Sensors for Determination of Analytes in Solutions)

Review

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Open AccessReview A Review of Interface Electronic Systems for AT-cut Quartz Crystal Microbalance Applications in Liquids
Sensors 2008, 8(1), 370-411; doi:10.3390/s8010370
Received: 28 December 2007 / Accepted: 16 January 2008 / Published: 21 January 2008
Cited by 52 | PDF Full-text (824 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
From the first applications of AT-cut quartz crystals as sensors in solutionsmore than 20 years ago, the so-called quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor isbecoming into a good alternative analytical method in a great deal of applications such asbiosensors, analysis of biomolecular interactions, study
[...] Read more.
From the first applications of AT-cut quartz crystals as sensors in solutionsmore than 20 years ago, the so-called quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor isbecoming into a good alternative analytical method in a great deal of applications such asbiosensors, analysis of biomolecular interactions, study of bacterial adhesion at specificinterfaces, pathogen and microorganism detection, study of polymer film-biomolecule orcell-substrate interactions, immunosensors and an extensive use in fluids and polymercharacterization and electrochemical applications among others. The appropriateevaluation of this analytical method requires recognizing the different steps involved andto be conscious of their importance and limitations. The first step involved in a QCMsystem is the accurate and appropriate characterization of the sensor in relation to thespecific application. The use of the piezoelectric sensor in contact with solutions stronglyaffects its behavior and appropriate electronic interfaces must be used for an adequatesensor characterization. Systems based on different principles and techniques have beenimplemented during the last 25 years. The interface selection for the specific application isimportant and its limitations must be known to be conscious of its suitability, and foravoiding the possible error propagation in the interpretation of results. This article presentsa comprehensive overview of the different techniques used for AT-cut quartz crystalmicrobalance in in-solution applications, which are based on the following principles:network or impedance analyzers, decay methods, oscillators and lock-in techniques. Theelectronic interfaces based on oscillators and phase-locked techniques are treated in detail,with the description of different configurations, since these techniques are the most used inapplications for detection of analytes in solutions, and in those where a fast sensorresponse is necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Sensors for Determination of Analytes in Solutions)

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