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Special Issue "Polymers for Oro-Dental and Cranio- Maxillo-Facial Applications"

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A special issue of Polymers (ISSN 2073-4360).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 August 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ziyad S. Haidar

1 Department of Pharmaceutics & Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake, UT, USA
2 Department of Bone Bioengineering & Regenerative Medicine, Utah-Inha Drug Delivery Systems & Advanced Therapeutics Research Center, B-404 Meet-You-All Tower, Songdo,TechnoPark 7-50, Songdo-Dong, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon 406-840, Korea
E-Mail
Phone: +82 32 858 9404
Fax: +82 032 890 3698
Interests: biomedical applications; bio-functional coatings; bone; bone morphogenetic proteins; drug delivery; odontology; scaffolds; hydrogels; core-shell nanoparticles; natural polymers and resins; polymer colloids and films; composites and restorative biomaterials; oral implantology; responsive biomaterials; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; liposomes; periodontology; sealants and coatings; oral cancer and bone metastases

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers; primarily as bioresorbable suture materials; in medicine and dentistry largely started around the mid 20th Century. Today, our knowledge on such promising biomaterials has developed gigantically expanding their prospective applications significantly. On the other hand, traditional bone grafts, allografts and those biocompatible artificial bone substitutes have thus far well-established shortcomings especially when used for the repair of cranial and oro-maxillofacial defects. Today, a prominent alternative is tissue engineering and localized/targeted therapeutic (drug or protein) delivery raising hopes for the repair of such critical-sized defects, with applications extending beyond bones to include periodontal ligament regeneration and tooth bud implantation in parallel to progress in restorative materials and implants.

This special issue will focus on such modern approaches of polymeric-based technologies towards applications in the cranio-oro-maxillo-facial complex; especially those addressing past, current and future challenges in facial bone structures and periodontal ligament/tooth structure regeneration, bone and cartilage tissue engineering, implant biomaterials and surface coatings, intra-oral and dental restorative/esthetic bio-functional biomaterials; etc … Hence, the aim herein is to provide an up-to-date ‘clinically-relevant’/’translational – bench to bed’ status report and eventual consensus on the application of nanotechnology, polymers and polymeric-based systems, formulations and devices (including the relevant preparatory and conditioning issues) in the oral and cranio-maxillo-facial field with topics ranging from effect on cellular and molecular mechanisms, signaling pathways characterization, nanotools and extending to clinically-relevant diagnostics and localized, release-controlled and customized protein and/or drug delivery to the cranio-maxillo-facial complex.

It is with great anticipation we await your contributions to this special issue of Polymers.

Prof. Dr. Ziyad S. Haidar
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • polymers
  • oro/dental/facial tissue engineering
  • dental implants, surfaces and coatings
  • composite resins and restorative biomaterials
  • thermo- and photo-responsive polymers
  • periodontal ligament and tooth regeneration
  • bone and cartilage regeneration
  • endodontics
  • biosensors
  • bioimaging
  • smart or intelligent polymers
  • drug delivery systems
  • shape memory polymers
  • cranial vault
  • bone defects

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Shrinkage Characteristics of Experimental Polymer Containing Composites under Controlled Light Curing Modes
Polymers 2012, 4(1), 256-274; doi:10.3390/polym4010256
Received: 14 December 2011 / Revised: 4 January 2012 / Accepted: 14 January 2012 / Published: 18 January 2012
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Abstract
The adsorption of polymethylmethacrylate polymer of different molecular weight at the aerosil/ethyleneglycol- or 1,3 butanediol-dimethacrylate interfaces was determined to provide microstructured networks. Their structural characteristics were determined to be controlled by the amount of polymer initially supplied to the system. The sediment (the
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The adsorption of polymethylmethacrylate polymer of different molecular weight at the aerosil/ethyleneglycol- or 1,3 butanediol-dimethacrylate interfaces was determined to provide microstructured networks. Their structural characteristics were determined to be controlled by the amount of polymer initially supplied to the system. The sediment (the settled phase) characteristics, determined as a function of the polymer concentration and the rate of the polymerization shrinkage determined for composite resins, obtained by extrusion of the sediment after centrifugation, were found to be correlated. The specific role of the adsorbed polymer was found to be differently perturbed with the supplementary supply of dimethacrylate based monomer additives. Particularly, the bisphenol A dimethacrylate that generated crystals within the sediment was found to impede the shrinkage along the crystal lateral faces and strongly limit the shrinkage along its basal faces. Addition of ethyleneglycol- or polyethylene-glycoldimethacrylate monomers was determined to modify the sedimentation characteristics of the aerosil suspension and the shrinkage properties of the composites. Finally, the effects of stepwise light curing methods with prolonged lighting-off periods were investigated and found to modify the development and the final values of the composite shrinkage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Oro-Dental and Cranio- Maxillo-Facial Applications)
Figures

Open AccessArticle The Effects of Exposure Time on the Surface Microhardness of Three Dual-Cured Dental Resin Cements
Polymers 2011, 3(3), 998-1005; doi:10.3390/polym3030998
Received: 20 May 2011 / Revised: 13 June 2011 / Accepted: 20 June 2010 / Published: 28 June 2011
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study evaluated the exposure time of light-curing of the polymers used for cementation on microhardness test in different storage times. The polymers (specifically called resin cements) were RelyX ARC, RelyX U100, and SET. Five specimens of each group were prepared and photo-polymerized
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This study evaluated the exposure time of light-curing of the polymers used for cementation on microhardness test in different storage times. The polymers (specifically called resin cements) were RelyX ARC, RelyX U100, and SET. Five specimens of each group were prepared and photo-polymerized with exposure times of 20 s and 180 s, using a LED polymerization unit with wavelength of 440 ~ 480 nm and light output was consistently 1,500 mW/cm2. The Vickers hardness test was performed in a MMT-3 Microhardness Tester. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The values of RelyX ARC showed statistically significant difference to groups with light exposure when considering only chemical cure (p < 0.05). The groups with light exposure (20 s and 180 s) showed no significant difference between them (p > 0.05). The RelyX U100 cured only chemically showed statistically significant difference between 48 h and 7 days (p < 0.05). The SET resin cement showed no significant difference to groups without light exposure for all storage times (p > 0.05). The values of hardening of the dual-cured resin cements improved after setting by light and chemical activation demonstrating the importance of light curing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Oro-Dental and Cranio- Maxillo-Facial Applications)
Open AccessCommunication A Novel Self-Assembled Liposome-Based Polymeric Hydrogel for Cranio-Maxillofacial Applications: Preliminary Findings
Polymers 2011, 3(2), 967-974; doi:10.3390/polym3020967
Received: 30 May 2011 / Revised: 3 June 2011 / Accepted: 13 June 2011 / Published: 14 June 2011
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (432 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Soft nanogels are submicron-sized hydrophilic structures engineered from biocompatible polymers possessing the characteristics of nanoparticles as well as hydrogels, with a wide array of potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine, namely, drug and protein delivery. In this work, nanogels were obtained using the
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Soft nanogels are submicron-sized hydrophilic structures engineered from biocompatible polymers possessing the characteristics of nanoparticles as well as hydrogels, with a wide array of potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine, namely, drug and protein delivery. In this work, nanogels were obtained using the physical self-assembly technique or ‘layer-by-layer’ which is based on electrostatic interactions. Liposomal vesicles were coated with alternating layers of hyaluronic acid and chitosan yielding a more viscous hydrogel formulation that previously reported core-shell nanoparticulate suspension, via simply modifying the physico-chemical characteristics of the system. Structural features, size, surface charge, stability and swelling characteristics of the nanogel were studied using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. With a specific cranio-maxillofacial application in mind, the hydrogel was loaded with recombinant human (rh) bone morphogenetic protein-7, also known as osteogenic protein-1 or rhOP-1 and release was monitored over an extended period of 60 days. This preliminary study reports promising results on the formulation of a novel core-shell polymeric nanogel. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Oro-Dental and Cranio- Maxillo-Facial Applications)

Review

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Open AccessReview Regeneration Approaches for Dental Pulp and Periapical Tissues with Growth Factors, Biomaterials, and Laser Irradiation
Polymers 2011, 3(4), 1776-1793; doi:10.3390/polym3041776
Received: 4 August 2011 / Revised: 26 September 2011 / Accepted: 11 October 2011 / Published: 12 October 2011
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (1103 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In current dental practice, restorative and endodontic procedures have been developed in an attempt to preserve the vitality of dental pulp after exposure to external stimuli such as caries infection. When damage to dental pulp is reversible, pulp wound healing can proceed, whereas
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In current dental practice, restorative and endodontic procedures have been developed in an attempt to preserve the vitality of dental pulp after exposure to external stimuli such as caries infection. When damage to dental pulp is reversible, pulp wound healing can proceed, whereas irreversible damage induces pathological changes in dental pulp, eventually requiring its removal. Furthermore, dentists sometimes extract non-vital teeth because of severe caries progression, critical size of periapical lesion, and tooth fracture. To overcome the limitations of presently available therapies, it is important to develop regeneration therapy for dental pulp and periapical tissues. In this review, we focus on the regeneration of dental pulp and periapical tissues by application of exogenous growth factors and scaffolds, as well as low-intensity laser irradiation as an auxiliary therapy for regeneration therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polymers for Oro-Dental and Cranio- Maxillo-Facial Applications)

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polymers@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
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