Special Issue "Recent Developments and Future Perspectives in Dissolution Testing"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jaakko Aaltonen

School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio, Finland
E-Mail
Interests: dissolution testing; dissolution method development; in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC); formulation development

Keywords

  • dissolution testing
  • dissolution method development
  • in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC)
  • formulation development

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle In Vitro Dissolution Methods for Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Porous Silicon Microparticles
Pharmaceutics 2011, 3(2), 315-325; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics3020315
Received: 13 April 2011 / Accepted: 20 June 2011 / Published: 21 June 2011
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (272 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Porous silicon (PSi) is an innovative inorganic material that has been recently developed for various drug delivery systems. For example, hydrophilic and hydrophobic PSi microparticles have been utilized to improve the dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs and to sustain peptide delivery. Previously,
[...] Read more.
Porous silicon (PSi) is an innovative inorganic material that has been recently developed for various drug delivery systems. For example, hydrophilic and hydrophobic PSi microparticles have been utilized to improve the dissolution rate of poorly soluble drugs and to sustain peptide delivery. Previously, the well-plate method has been demonstrated to be a suitable in vitro dissolution method for hydrophilic PSi particles but it was not applicable to poorly wetting hydrophobic thermally hydrocarbonized PSi (THCPSi) particles. In this work, three different in vitro dissolution techniques, namely centrifuge, USP Apparatus 1 (basket) and well-plate methods were compared by using hydrophilic thermally carbonized PSi (TCPSi) microparticles loaded with poorly soluble ibuprofen or freely soluble antipyrine. All the methods showed a fast and complete or nearly complete release of both model compounds from the TCPSi microparticles indicating that all methods described in vitro dissolution equally. Based on these results, the centrifuge method was chosen to study the release of a peptide (ghrelin antagonist) from the THCPSi microparticles since it requires small sample amounts and achieves good particle suspendability. Sustained peptide release from the THCPSi microparticles was observed, which is in agreement with an earlier in vivo study. In conclusion, the centrifuge method was demonstrated to be a suitable tool for the evaluation of drug release from hydrophobic THCPSi particles, and the sustained peptide release from THCPSi microparticles was detected. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments and Future Perspectives in Dissolution Testing)
Open AccessArticle Development of a New Type of Prolonged Release Hydrocodone Formulation Based on Egalet® ADPREM Technology Using In Vivo–In Vitro Correlation
Pharmaceutics 2011, 3(1), 73-87; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics3010073
Received: 6 February 2011 / Revised: 28 February 2011 / Accepted: 4 March 2011 / Published: 9 March 2011
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (444 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A novel abuse deterrent, prolonged release tablet formulation of Hydrocodone for once-daily dosing has been developed, based on the novel proprietary Egalet® ADPREM technology. The tablet is an injection molded polymer system consisting of an erodible matrix in which the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient
[...] Read more.
A novel abuse deterrent, prolonged release tablet formulation of Hydrocodone for once-daily dosing has been developed, based on the novel proprietary Egalet® ADPREM technology. The tablet is an injection molded polymer system consisting of an erodible matrix in which the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API), such as Hydrocodone, is dispersed. The matrix is partly covered with a water-impermeable, non-erodible shell which leaves both ends of the cylindrical tablet exposed to erosion by the gastrointestinal (GI) fluid. In vivo–in vitro correlation (IVIVC) was initiated and validated with three formulations. A good internal predictability was observed for the three formulations. How the changing conditions in the GI tract influenced in vivo performance of an erosion based product was discussed. The validated IVIVC could be used to optimize the tablet formulation and to obtain a desired profile. In addition, this technique could help to establish the dissolution limits in which a certainty of bioequivalence is calculated. Based on this validated level A IVIVC, dissolution can be used as surrogate of bioequivalence for development, but also scale up post approval changes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments and Future Perspectives in Dissolution Testing)
Open AccessArticle The Influence of Milling on the Dissolution Performance of Simvastatin
Pharmaceutics 2010, 2(4), 419-431; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics2040419
Received: 2 December 2010 / Revised: 13 December 2010 / Accepted: 16 December 2010 / Published: 17 December 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (523 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Particle size reduction is a simple means to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble BCS-class II and IV drugs. However, the major drawback of this process is the possible introduction of process induced disorder. Drugs with different molecular arrangements may exhibit
[...] Read more.
Particle size reduction is a simple means to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble BCS-class II and IV drugs. However, the major drawback of this process is the possible introduction of process induced disorder. Drugs with different molecular arrangements may exhibit altered properties such as solubility and dissolution rate and, therefore, process induced solid state modifications need to be monitored. The aim of this study was two-fold: firstly, to investigate the dissolution rates of milled and unmilled simvastatin; and secondly, to screen for the main milling factors, as well as factor interactions in a dry ball milling process using simvastatin as model drug, and to optimize the milling procedure with regard to the opposing responses particle size and process induced disorder by application of a central composite face centered design. Particle size was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. Process induced disorder was determined by partial least squares (PLS) regression modeling of respective X-ray powder diffractograms (XRPD) and Raman spectra. Valid and significant quadratic models were built. The investigated milling factors were milling frequency, milling time and ball quantity at a set drug load, out of which milling frequency was found to be the most important factor for particle size as well as process induced disorder. Milling frequency and milling time exhibited an interaction effect on the responses. The optimum milling settings using the maximum number of milling balls (60 balls with 4 mm diameter) was determined to be at a milling frequency of 21 Hz and a milling time of 36 min with a resulting primary particle size of 1.4 μm and a process induced disorder of 6.1% (assessed by Raman spectroscopy) and 8.4% (assessed by XRPD), at a set optimization limit of < 2 μm for particle size and < 10% for process induced disorder. This optimum was tested experimentally and the process induced disorder was determined to be 6.9% (± 2.2) by Raman spectroscopy and 7.8% (± 2.3) by XRPD. Subsequent intrinsic dissolution testing revealed that the process induced disorder was negligible with regard to the dissolution rate. The predicted primary particle size of 1.4 μm could be confirmed experimentally, but due to agglomeration of the primary particles a dissolution rate advantage was not shown, highlighting the importance of dissolution testing at an early stage of drug development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments and Future Perspectives in Dissolution Testing)
Open AccessArticle Small Volume Dissolution Testing as a Powerful Method during Pharmaceutical Development
Pharmaceutics 2010, 2(4), 351-363; doi:10.3390/pharmaceutics2040351
Received: 12 October 2010 / Revised: 26 October 2010 / Accepted: 28 October 2010 / Published: 1 November 2010
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (184 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Standard compendia dissolution apparatus are the first choice for development of new dissolution methods. Nevertheless, limitations coming from the amount of material available, analytical sensitivity, lack of discrimination or biorelevance may warrant the use of non compendial methods. In this regard, the use
[...] Read more.
Standard compendia dissolution apparatus are the first choice for development of new dissolution methods. Nevertheless, limitations coming from the amount of material available, analytical sensitivity, lack of discrimination or biorelevance may warrant the use of non compendial methods. In this regard, the use of small volume dissolution methods offers strong advantages. The present study aims primarily to evaluate the dissolution performance of various drug products having different release mechanisms, using commercially available small volume USP2 dissolution equipment. The present series of tests indicate that the small volume dissolution is a useful tool for the characterization of immediate release drug product. Depending on the release mechanism, different speed factors are proposed to mimic common one liter vessel performance. In addition, by increasing the discriminating power of the dissolution method, it potentially improves know how about formulations and on typical events which are evaluated during pharmaceutical development such as ageing or scale–up. In this regard, small volume dissolution is a method of choice in case of screening for critical quality attributes of rapidly dissolving tablets, where it is often difficult to detect differences using standard working conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Developments and Future Perspectives in Dissolution Testing)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Pharmaceutics Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
pharmaceutics@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Pharmaceutics
Back to Top