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Special Issue "Materials for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Anuj Chauhan

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida Gainesville, FL 32611, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ophthalmic drug delivery is fast becoming a very important area of research due to a continuous aging of the world population. There is an incredible range of drug types in terms of both physical properties and sizes which need to be delivered for treating diseases both in the anterior and the posterior segments of the eye. This presents materials researchers with unique opportunities to develop new approaches, devices, materials for targeted and controlled delivery of drugs to various ophthalmic tissues. We invite papers focusing directly on ophthalmic applications as well as papers that focus on approaches or materials that are currently utilized in other parts of the body, but could be adapted for ocular applications.

Dr. Anuj Chauhan
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • contact lenses
  • conjunctival inserts
  • punctal plugs
  • nanoparticles
  • mucoadhesion
  • vitreous
  • cornea
  • retina
  • macular degeneration
  • blood-retina barrier
  • retina inserts
  • gene therapy
  • stimuli responsive gels

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Release of Ciprofloxacin-HCl and Dexamethasone Phosphate by Hyaluronic Acid Containing Silicone Polymers
Materials 2012, 5(4), 684-698; doi:10.3390/ma5040684
Received: 8 March 2012 / Accepted: 10 April 2012 / Published: 19 April 2012
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1166 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the covalent incorporation of hyaluronic acid (HA) into conventional hydrogel and hydrogels containing silicone as models for contact lens materials on the uptake and release of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin and the
[...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the covalent incorporation of hyaluronic acid (HA) into conventional hydrogel and hydrogels containing silicone as models for contact lens materials on the uptake and release of the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin and the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone phosphate. A 3 mg/mL ciprofloxacin solution (0.3% w/v) and a 1 mg/mL dexamethasone phosphate solution (0.1%) was prepared in borate buffered saline. Three hydrogel material samples (pHEMA; pHEMA TRIS; DMAA TRIS) were prepared with and without the covalent incorporation of HA of molecular weight (MW) 35 or 132 kDa. Hydrogel discs were punched from a sheet of material with a uniform diameter of 5 mm. Uptake kinetics were evaluated at room temperature by soaking the discs for 24 h. Release kinetics were evaluated by placing the drug-loaded discs in saline at 34 °C in a shaking water bath. At various time points over 6–7 days, aliquots of the release medium were assayed for drug amounts. The majority of the materials tested released sufficient drug to be clinically relevant in an ophthalmic application, reaching desired concentrations for antibiotic or anti-inflammatory activity in solution. Overall, the silicone-based hydrogels (pHEMA TRIS and DMAA TRIS), released lower amounts of drug than the conventional pHEMA material (p < 0.001). Materials with HA MW132 released more ciprofloxacin compared to materials with HA MW35 and lenses without HA (p < 0.02). Some HA-based materials were still releasing the drug after 6 days. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery)
Open AccessArticle Acetic and Acrylic Acid Molecular Imprinted Model Silicone Hydrogel Materials for Ciprofloxacin-HCl Delivery
Materials 2012, 5(1), 85-107; doi:10.3390/ma5010085
Received: 8 November 2011 / Revised: 18 December 2011 / Accepted: 20 December 2011 / Published: 2 January 2012
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (2826 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Contact lenses, as an alternative drug delivery vehicle for the eye compared to eye drops, are desirable due to potential advantages in dosing regimen, bioavailability and patient tolerance/compliance. The challenge has been to engineer and develop these materials to sustain drug delivery to
[...] Read more.
Contact lenses, as an alternative drug delivery vehicle for the eye compared to eye drops, are desirable due to potential advantages in dosing regimen, bioavailability and patient tolerance/compliance. The challenge has been to engineer and develop these materials to sustain drug delivery to the eye for a long period of time. In this study, model silicone hydrogel materials were created using a molecular imprinting strategy to deliver the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Acetic and acrylic acid were used as the functional monomers, to interact with the ciprofloxacin template to efficiently create recognition cavities within the final polymerized material. Synthesized materials were loaded with 9.06 mM, 0.10 mM and 0.025 mM solutions of ciprofloxacin, and the release of ciprofloxacin into an artificial tear solution was monitored over time. The materials were shown to release for periods varying from 3 to 14 days, dependent on the loading solution, functional monomer concentration and functional monomer:template ratio, with materials with greater monomer:template ratio (8:1 and 16:1 imprinted) tending to release for longer periods of time. Materials with a lower monomer:template ratio (4:1 imprinted) tended to release comparatively greater amounts of ciprofloxacin into solution, but the release was somewhat shorter. The total amount of drug released from the imprinted materials was sufficient to reach levels relevant to inhibit the growth of common ocular isolates of bacteria. This work is one of the first to demonstrate the feasibility of molecular imprinting in model silicone hydrogel-type materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery)

Review

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Open AccessReview Advances in Retinal Tissue Engineering
Materials 2012, 5(1), 108-120; doi:10.3390/ma5010108
Received: 2 November 2011 / Revised: 21 December 2011 / Accepted: 24 December 2011 / Published: 5 January 2012
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (522 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Retinal degenerations cause permanent visual loss and affect millions world-wide. Current treatment strategies, such as gene therapy and anti-angiogenic drugs, merely delay disease progression. Research is underway which aims to regenerate the diseased retina by transplanting a variety of cell types, including embryonic
[...] Read more.
Retinal degenerations cause permanent visual loss and affect millions world-wide. Current treatment strategies, such as gene therapy and anti-angiogenic drugs, merely delay disease progression. Research is underway which aims to regenerate the diseased retina by transplanting a variety of cell types, including embryonic stem cells, fetal cells, progenitor cells and induced pluripotent stem cells. Initial retinal transplantation studies injected stem and progenitor cells into the vitreous or subretinal space with the hope that these donor cells would migrate to the site of retinal degeneration, integrate within the host retina and restore functional vision. Despite promising outcomes, these studies showed that the bolus injection technique gave rise to poorly localized tissue grafts. Subsequently, retinal tissue engineers have drawn upon the success of bone, cartilage and vasculature tissue engineering by employing a polymeric tissue engineering approach. This review will describe the evolution of retinal tissue engineering to date, with particular emphasis on the types of polymers that have routinely been used in recent investigations. Further, this review will show that the field of retinal tissue engineering will require new types of materials and fabrication techniques that optimize the survival, differentiation and delivery of retinal transplant cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery)
Open AccessReview Drug-Eluting Intraocular Lenses
Materials 2011, 4(11), 1927-1940; doi:10.3390/ma4111927
Received: 6 October 2011 / Revised: 20 October 2011 / Accepted: 25 October 2011 / Published: 1 November 2011
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (288 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Notable advances in materials science and in surgical techniques make the management of cataract by replacement of the opaque crystalline with an intraocular lens (IOL), one of the most cost-effective interventions in current healthcare. The usefulness and safety of IOLs can be enhanced
[...] Read more.
Notable advances in materials science and in surgical techniques make the management of cataract by replacement of the opaque crystalline with an intraocular lens (IOL), one of the most cost-effective interventions in current healthcare. The usefulness and safety of IOLs can be enhanced if they are endowed with the ability to load and to sustain drug release in the implantation site. Drug-eluting IOLs can prevent infections and untoward reactions of eye tissues (which lead to opacification) and also can act as drug depots for treatment of several other ocular pathologies. Such a myriad of therapeutic possibilities has prompted the design of drug-IOL combination products. Several approaches are under study, namely combination of the IOL with an insert in a single device, soaking in drug solutions, impregnation using supercritical fluids, coating with drug/polymer layers, and covalent grafting of the drug. The advantages/limitations of each technique are discussed in the present review on selected examples. Although more in vivo data are required, the information already available proves the interest of some approaches in ocular therapeutics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Materials for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery)
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