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Special Issue "Nanomaterials"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2010)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Mingdong Dong (Website)

Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Department of Physics and Astronomy University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Arhus C, Denmark
Fax: +45 8612 0740
Interests: surface science and surface characterization; biomedical and biomolecular materials; nanomaterials
Guest Editor
Dr. Kislon Voïtchovsky

Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Ave., Cambridge MA, USA
Interests: Scanning probe microscopy; Solid-liquid interfaces; Single-molecule biophysics; Nanomedicine; Biomimetic nanomaterials
Editorial Advisor
Dr. Paul J. Simmonds (Website)

Department of Physics, Boise State University, 1910 University Drive, Boise, ID 83725-1570, USA
Interests: molecular beam epitaxy; III-V semiconductors; self-assembled nanostructures; quantum dots; tensile strain; epitaxial 2D materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials, as one of the fast-growing discipline fields, contain true nanoscale structures that enable novel properties or advanced functions. The production of advanced materials has brought more and more focus on nanomaterials due to their significant chemical physical properties and surface effect. Not only materials scientists but also researchers from other disciplines such as physics, chemistry and biology have been involved in working on science and applications of nanostructured materials with varied emphasis on synthesis, processing, characterization, and applications (energy, environment, life science, electronics etc.). The special issue covers current trends and developments in nanomaterials. The papers can involve both the basic research and the application development relating to experimental, theoretical, computational, and applications of nanomaterials.

Dr. Mingdong Dong
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • nanoscale materials and processes
  • computation, modelling and materials theory
  • surfaces and thin films
  • catalysts
  • analytic and characterization methods
  • engineering structural materials
  • design, synthesis, patterning
  • composite materials
  • Biomaterials and Membranes

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Surfactant Effects on Microemulsion-Based Nanoparticle Synthesis
Materials 2011, 4(1), 55-72; doi:10.3390/ma4010055
Received: 24 November 2010 / Revised: 17 December 2010 / Accepted: 21 December 2010 / Published: 29 December 2010
Cited by 12 | PDF Full-text (547 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of the surfactant on the size, polydispersity, type of size distribution and structure of nanoparticles synthesized in microemulsions has been studied by computer simulation. The model simulates the surfactant by means of two parameters: the intermicellar exchange parameter, kex [...] Read more.
The effect of the surfactant on the size, polydispersity, type of size distribution and structure of nanoparticles synthesized in microemulsions has been studied by computer simulation. The model simulates the surfactant by means of two parameters: the intermicellar exchange parameter, kex, related to dimer life time, and film flexibility parameter, f, related to interdroplet channel size. One can conclude that an increase in surfactant flexibility leads to bigger and polydisperse nanoparticle sizes. In addition, at high concentrations, the same reaction gives rise to a unimodal distribution using a flexible surfactant, and a bimodal distribution using a rigid one. In relation to bimetallic nanoparticles, if the nanoparticle is composed of two metals with a moderate difference in reduction potentials, increasing the surfactant flexibility modifies the nanoparticle structure, giving rise to a transition from a nanoalloy (using a rigid film) to a core-shell structure (using a flexible one). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials)
Figures

Open AccessReview Morphologies, Preparations and Applications of Layered Double Hydroxide Micro-/Nanostructures
Materials 2010, 3(12), 5220-5235; doi:10.3390/ma3125220
Received: 28 October 2010 / Revised: 29 November 2010 / Accepted: 3 December 2010 / Published: 9 December 2010
Cited by 41 | PDF Full-text (655 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also well-known as hydrotalcite-like layered clays, have been widely investigated in the fields of catalysts and catalyst support, anion exchanger, electrical and optical functional materials, flame retardants and nanoadditives. This feature article focuses on the progress in micro-/nanostructured [...] Read more.
Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also well-known as hydrotalcite-like layered clays, have been widely investigated in the fields of catalysts and catalyst support, anion exchanger, electrical and optical functional materials, flame retardants and nanoadditives. This feature article focuses on the progress in micro-/nanostructured LDHs in terms of morphology, and also on the preparations, applications, and perspectives of the LDHs with different morphologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials)
Figures

Open AccessReview Ion-Induced Nanoscale Ripple Patterns on Si Surfaces: Theory and Experiment
Materials 2010, 3(10), 4811-4841; doi:10.3390/ma3104811
Received: 31 August 2010 / Revised: 18 October 2010 / Accepted: 19 October 2010 / Published: 22 October 2010
Cited by 37 | PDF Full-text (3104 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanopatterning of solid surfaces by low-energy ion bombardment has received considerable interest in recent years. This interest was partially motivated by promising applications of nanopatterned substrates in the production of functional surfaces. Especially nanoscale ripple patterns on Si surfaces have attracted attention [...] Read more.
Nanopatterning of solid surfaces by low-energy ion bombardment has received considerable interest in recent years. This interest was partially motivated by promising applications of nanopatterned substrates in the production of functional surfaces. Especially nanoscale ripple patterns on Si surfaces have attracted attention both from a fundamental and an application related point of view. This paper summarizes the theoretical basics of ion-induced pattern formation and compares the predictions of various continuum models to experimental observations with special emphasis on the morphology development of Si surfaces during sub-keV ion sputtering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials)

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