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Special Issue "Fibrous Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Assistant Editor
Mr. Vincent Milleret

Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Interests: tissue engineering; production and processing of polymer scaffolds; polymer surface modification

Special Issue Information

We are sorry to announce that Dr. Heike Hall (ETH Zurich, Switzerland) passed away on 22 July 2011 after a long fight with disease. In addition to being the initial Guest Editor for this special issue, she was a key Editorial Board member of the journal Materials and will be greatly missed.

 

Dear Collegues,

Scaffolds for tissue engineering need to fulfil many requirements. Inspired by the architecture of native extracellular matrix, fibrous scaffolds are regarded to be a promising solution for engineered tissue-substitutes as they provide some key features, being the fiber structure itself presenting a large surface area for cell attachment, comparatively high interfiber distances allowing cell infiltration, nutrition and gas exchange and structural support that can be adjusted according to the needs of the tissue to be replaced.
In this special issue different ways of production of fibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering will be introduced and their advantaged discussed. The main focus will be on electrospun scaffolds as this technique allows producing controlled fibers assembling to fiber fleeces containing randomly oriented or aligned fibers. The materials that can be used vary from native macromolecules to purely synthetic polymers, even metals and ceramics have been described. Electrospinning allows large production of fibrous scaffold and might therefore be a very elegant, cost-efficient and versatile technique to be applied for production of scaffolds in tissue engineering.
Several applications for fibrous scaffolds in hollow organ tissue engineering such as cardiovascular devices, bladder and trachea will be discussed.

Heike Hall
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • tissue engineering
  • fibrous scaffolds
  • electrospinning
  • porosity
  • drug delivery

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Novel Textile Scaffolds Generated by Flock Technology for Tissue Engineering of Bone and Cartilage
Materials 2012, 5(3), 540-557; doi:10.3390/ma5030540
Received: 22 December 2011 / Revised: 7 March 2012 / Accepted: 12 March 2012 / Published: 22 March 2012
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1138 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Textile scaffolds can be found in a variety of application areas in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study we used electrostatic flocking—a well-known textile technology—to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering of bone. Flock scaffolds stand out due to their [...] Read more.
Textile scaffolds can be found in a variety of application areas in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. In the present study we used electrostatic flocking—a well-known textile technology—to produce scaffolds for tissue engineering of bone. Flock scaffolds stand out due to their unique structure: parallel arranged fibers that are aligned perpendicularly to a substrate, resulting in mechanically stable structures with a high porosity. In compression tests we demonstrated good mechanical properties of such scaffolds and in cell culture experiments we showed that flock scaffolds allow attachment and proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells and support their osteogenic differentiation. These matrices represent promising scaffolds for tissue engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fibrous Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle Oriented Collagen Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering
Materials 2012, 5(3), 501-511; doi:10.3390/ma5030501
Received: 25 February 2012 / Revised: 6 March 2012 / Accepted: 8 March 2012 / Published: 16 March 2012
Cited by 10 | PDF Full-text (1300 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. [...] Read more.
Oriented collagen scaffolds were developed in the form of sheet, mesh and tube by arraying flow-oriented collagen string gels and dehydrating the arrayed gels. The developed collagen scaffolds can be any practical size with any direction of orientation for tissue engineering applications. The birefringence of the collagen scaffolds was quantitatively analyzed by parallel Nicols method. Since native collagen in the human body has orientations such as bone, cartilage, tendon and cornea, and the orientation has a special role for the function of human organs, the developed various types of three-dimensional oriented collagen scaffolds are expected to be useful biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fibrous Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering)
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