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Special Issue "Dental Biomaterials"

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A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kunio Ishikawa

Department of Biomaterials, Faculty of Dental Science, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi, Fukuoka 812-8582 Japan
Fax: +81-92-642-6344

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, significant improvement has been made for the dental materials research such as dental implant, dental adhesive, and zirconia based dental materials. Although special issue of Materials entitled “Dental Materials” was closed, we feel the strong need to provide opportunity to present further dental materials research results and review papers to the materials community. Here, I would like to call for papers for “Dental Biomaterials”. This special issue will facilitate further understanding between the dental materials community and the broader materials community as well as among the dental materials community.

Prof. Dr. Kunio Ishikawa
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • dental material
  • dental implant
  • dental zirconia
  • dental materials for CAD-CAM
  • surface modification
  • dental adhesive
  • dental tissue engineering
  • scaffold, titanium
  • shape memory alloy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle In vitro Biocompatibility of New Silver(I) Coordination Compound Coated-Surfaces for Dental Implant Applications
Materials 2011, 4(2), 355-367; doi:10.3390/ma4020355
Received: 4 January 2011 / Revised: 19 January 2011 / Accepted: 24 January 2011 / Published: 28 January 2011
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (1809 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Biofilm formation on implant materials causes a common problem: resistance to aggressive pharmacological agents as well as host defenses. Therefore, to reduce bacterial adhesion to implant surfaces we propose to use silver(I) coordination networks as it is known that silver is the [...] Read more.
Biofilm formation on implant materials causes a common problem: resistance to aggressive pharmacological agents as well as host defenses. Therefore, to reduce bacterial adhesion to implant surfaces we propose to use silver(I) coordination networks as it is known that silver is the most powerful antimicrobial inorganic agent. As a model surface, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold Au(111) was used to permit permanent attachment of our silver(I) coordination networks. The surface coatings showed typical nano-structured surfaces with a good biocompatibility for soft-tissue integration with fibroblast cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Biomaterials)
Open AccessArticle Digital Computer Matching of Tooth Color
Materials 2010, 3(6), 3694-3699; doi:10.3390/ma3063694
Received: 10 May 2010 / Revised: 9 June 2010 / Accepted: 11 June 2010 / Published: 18 June 2010
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (176 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aimed to determine the validity of the digital photocolorimetric (PCM) method in matching the color of human teeth. First, two Vitapan Classical shade guides, each containing 16 shade guide teeth, were visually shade matched, and digital photographs of each three [...] Read more.
This study aimed to determine the validity of the digital photocolorimetric (PCM) method in matching the color of human teeth. First, two Vitapan Classical shade guides, each containing 16 shade guide teeth, were visually shade matched, and digital photographs of each three pair of shade guide teeth were taken in a color matching booth. Secondly, visual shade matching of the upper central incisors of 48 subjects was performed by two prosthodontists independently in a chair, using the Vitapan Classical shade guide. The three closest shade guide teeth were visually selected and ranked in order of preference, for which digital photographs were taken under ceiling daylight-corrected fluorescent lighting. All digital images were analyzed on a computer screen using software to calculate the color difference between the reference tooth and other teeth in the same digital image. The percent color matching for the shade guide teeth and human teeth was 88% and 75%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in matching the tooth color between the shade guide teeth and human teeth. The digital PCM method is valid for the range of human teeth based on the Vitapan Classical shade guide. This method enhances communication with the laboratory personnel in matching the tooth color. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dental Biomaterials)

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