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Special Issue "Marine Secondary Metabolite II, 2017"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Valeria Costantino

Department of Pharmacy, University of Naples "Federico II", Via Domenico Montesano 49, 80131 Napoli, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39081678504
Fax: +39 081 678552
Interests: isolation and stereostructural elucidation of new leads compounds in anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drug discovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This second edition of the Special Issue "Marine Secondary Metabolites" is aimed to collect papers on marine secondary metabolites produced by marine organisms and associated microorganisms, considered new scaffolds of potential lead compounds in drug research. Papers concerning neglected molecules, discovered within the frame of ongoing drug research programs, for which the bioactivity has not yet been explored, will be welcome with the idea to create a collection of novel molecules that specialists in antiproliferative, antikinases, antiinflammatory, antibacterial, quorum-quenching and quorum-sensing assays. This, in time, could translate into a number of novel lead compounds. Have a look in your lab and write about your "neglected molecule" which is as yet unknown to the scientific community! Reviews describing classes of secondary metabolites are also welcome.

Prof. Valeria Costantino
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Marine secondary metabolites
  • Isolation, structural elucidation
  • Stereochemistry assignments
  • Mixed biogenesis metabolites

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Isobenzofuranones and Isochromenones from the Deep-Sea Derived Fungus Leptosphaeria sp. SCSIO 41005
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(7), 204; doi:10.3390/md15070204
Received: 11 May 2017 / Revised: 26 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 29 June 2017
PDF Full-text (1547 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Four new isobenzofuranones, leptosphaerins J–M (14), including an unusual naturally-occurring centrosymmetric dimer skeleton (1), and two new isochromenones, clearanols I–J (910), were obtained from a culture of a deep-sea sediment-derived fungus Leptosphaeria sp.
[...] Read more.
Four new isobenzofuranones, leptosphaerins J–M (14), including an unusual naturally-occurring centrosymmetric dimer skeleton (1), and two new isochromenones, clearanols I–J (910), were obtained from a culture of a deep-sea sediment-derived fungus Leptosphaeria sp. SCSIO 41005, together with four known isobenzofuranones (58) and six known isochromenones (1116). These structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses, and absolute configurations were assigned on the basis of electronic circular dichroism and optical rotations data comparison. Additionally, the absolute configurations of the new compounds 1 and 9, together with the known one 7 with stereochemistry undetermined, were further confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction experiments. A plausible biosynthetic pathway of these isobenzofuranones and isochromenones was also proposed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Secondary Metabolite II, 2017)
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Open AccessArticle The Sea Urchin Arbacia lixula: A Novel Natural Source of Astaxanthin
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(6), 187; doi:10.3390/md15060187
Received: 31 March 2017 / Revised: 8 June 2017 / Accepted: 16 June 2017 / Published: 21 June 2017
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Abstract
Several echinoderms, including sea urchins, are valuable sources of bioactive compounds but their nutraceutical potential is largely unexplored. In fact, the gonads of some sea urchin species contain antioxidants including carotenoids and polyhydroxylated naphthoquinones (PHNQ’s), such as echinochrome A. Astaxanthin is known to
[...] Read more.
Several echinoderms, including sea urchins, are valuable sources of bioactive compounds but their nutraceutical potential is largely unexplored. In fact, the gonads of some sea urchin species contain antioxidants including carotenoids and polyhydroxylated naphthoquinones (PHNQ’s), such as echinochrome A. Astaxanthin is known to have particular bioactivity for the prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. This carotenoid is produced by microalgae, while several marine invertebrates can bioaccumulate or synthetize it from metabolic precursors. We determined the carotenoid content and analyzed the bioactivity potential of non-harvested Atlantic-Mediterranean sea urchin Arbacia lixula. The comparison of methanol crude extracts obtained from eggs of farmed and wild specimens revealed a higher bioactivity in farmed individuals fed with a customized fodder. HPLC-analysis revealed a high concentration of astaxanthin (27.0 μg/mg), which was the only pigment observed. This study highlights the potential of farmed A. lixula as a new source of the active stereoisomer of astaxanthin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Secondary Metabolite II, 2017)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Anti-Allergic Compounds from the Deep-Sea-Derived Actinomycete Nesterenkonia flava MCCC 1K00610
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(3), 71; doi:10.3390/md15030071
Received: 16 January 2017 / Revised: 16 February 2017 / Accepted: 10 March 2017 / Published: 14 March 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (806 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A novel cyclic ether, nesterenkoniane (1), was isolated from the deep-sea-derived actinomycete Nesterenkonia flava MCCC 1K00610, together with 12 known compounds, including two macrolides (2, 3), two diketopiperazines (4, 5), two nucleosides (6,
[...] Read more.
A novel cyclic ether, nesterenkoniane (1), was isolated from the deep-sea-derived actinomycete Nesterenkonia flava MCCC 1K00610, together with 12 known compounds, including two macrolides (2, 3), two diketopiperazines (4, 5), two nucleosides (6, 7), two indoles (8, 9), three phenolics (1012), and one butanol derivate (13). Their structures were established mainly on detailed analysis of the NMR and MS spectroscopic data. All 13 compounds were tested for anti-allergic activities using immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated rat mast RBL-2H3 cell model. Under the concentration of 20 μg/mL, 1 exhibited moderate anti-allergic activity with inhibition rate of 9.86%, compared to that of 37.41% of the positive control, loratadine. While cyclo(d)-Pro-(d)-Leu (4) and indol-3-carbaldehyde (8) showed the most potent effects with the IC50 values of 69.95 and 57.12 μg/mL, respectively, which was comparable to that of loratadine (IC50 = 35.01 μg/mL). To the best of our knowledge, it is the first report on secondary metabolites from the genus of Nesterenkonia. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Secondary Metabolite II, 2017)
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Figure 1

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