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Special Issue "Marine Compounds Used in Biosorption"

A special issue of Marine Drugs (ISSN 1660-3397).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Armando C. Duarte

Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) & Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: marine compounds, fit-for-purpose methods, biosorption, analytical chemistry, environmental chemistry
Guest Editor
Dr. Teresa A. P. Rocha-Santos

Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) & Department of Chemistry, University of Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biosensors; field effect transistors; carbon nanotubes and graphene; electrochemical (bio)sensors; antibody; marine environmental sensing; environmental sensing; analytical techniques fit for purpose

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A wide diversity of marine organisms can be found in the oceans and seas that cover around 70% of the world surface. These marine organisms can be a source of a plethora of extracts and compounds that show biological activity, such as biosorption. Biosorption is governed by a multitude of physico-chemical processes, based on mechanisms that include absorption, adsorption, ion exchange, surface complexation, and precipitation. Moreover, biosorption of environmental pollutants by marine derived compounds can be the basis for cost-effective, sustainable, and eco-friendly methods for reducing the impact of industrial and other anthropogenic activities, thus contributing to improvements in strategies for control of environmental quality. Furthermore, these compounds can be used in other applications, such as for drug delivery systems, advanced delivery systems compatible with agriculture usage, among others.

As Guest Editors of this Special Issue of Marine Drugs, we will invite researchers to provide their recent advances (review articles included) on the various aspects of marine compounds and extracts in biosorption.

Prof. Armando C. Duarte
Dr. Teresa A. P. Rocha Santos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Marine Drugs is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

• Marine compounds
• Marine extracts
• Biosorption
• Environmental protection
• Chemical characterization
• Sustainable development
• Blue economy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Cladophora glomerata Enriched by Biosorption Process in Cr(III) Improves Viability, and Reduces Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Equine Metabolic Syndrome Derived Adipose Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cells (ASCs) and Their Extracellular Vesicles (MV’s)
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(12), 385; doi:10.3390/md15120385
Received: 5 September 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 2 December 2017 / Published: 8 December 2017
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Abstract
This study investigated in vitro effects of freshwater alga Cladophora glomerata water extract enriched during a biosorption process in Cr(III) trivalent chromium and chromium picolinate on adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (ASCs) and extracellular microvesicles (MVs) in equine metabolic syndrome-affected horses. Chemical characterisation
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This study investigated in vitro effects of freshwater alga Cladophora glomerata water extract enriched during a biosorption process in Cr(III) trivalent chromium and chromium picolinate on adipose-derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells (ASCs) and extracellular microvesicles (MVs) in equine metabolic syndrome-affected horses. Chemical characterisation of natural Cladophora glomerata was performed with special emphasis on: vitamin C, vitamin E, total phenols, fatty acids, free and protein-bound amino acids as well as measured Cr in algal biomass. To examine the influence of Cladophora glomerata water extracts, in vitro viability, oxidative stress factor accumulation, apoptosis, inflammatory response, biogenesis of mitochondria, autophagy in ASCs of EMS and secretory activity manifested by MV release were investigated. For this purpose, various methods of molecular biology and microscopic observations (i.e., immunofluorescence staining, SEM, TEM, FIB observations, mRNA and microRNA expression by RT-qPCR) were applied. The extract of Cladophora glomerata enriched with Cr(III) ions reduced apoptosis and inflammation in ASCs of EMS horses through improvement of mitochondrial dynamics, decreasing of PDK4 expression and reduction of endoplastic reticulum stress. Moreover, it was found, that Cladophora glomerata and Cr(III) induce antioxidative protection coming from enhanced SOD activity Therefore, Cladophora glomerata enriched with Cr(III) ions might become an interesting future therapeutic agent in the pharmacological treatment of EMS horses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Compounds Used in Biosorption)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Algal Foams Applied in Fixed-Bed Process for Lead(II) Removal Using Recirculation or One-Pass Modes
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(10), 315; doi:10.3390/md15100315
Received: 24 August 2017 / Revised: 10 October 2017 / Accepted: 13 October 2017 / Published: 17 October 2017
PDF Full-text (2050 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The incorporation of brown algae into biopolymer beads or foams for metal sorption has been previously reported. However, the direct use of these biomasses for preparing foams is a new approach. In this study, two kinds of porous foams were prepared by ionotropic
[...] Read more.
The incorporation of brown algae into biopolymer beads or foams for metal sorption has been previously reported. However, the direct use of these biomasses for preparing foams is a new approach. In this study, two kinds of porous foams were prepared by ionotropic gelation using algal biomass (AB, Laminaria digitata) or alginate (as the reference) and applied for Pb(II) sorption. These foams (manufactured as macroporous discs) were packed in filtration holders (simulating fixed-bed column) and the system was operated in either a recirculation or a one-pass mode. Sorption isotherms, uptake kinetics and sorbent reuse were studied in the recirculation mode (analogous to batch system). In the one-pass mode (continuous fixed-bed system), the influence of parameters such as flow rate, feed metal concentration and bed height were investigated on both sorption and desorption. In addition, the effect of Cu(II) on Pb(II) recovery from binary solutions was also studied in terms of both sorption and desorption. Sorption isotherms are well fitted by the Langmuir equation while the pseudo-second order rate equation described well both sorption and desorption kinetic profiles. The study of material regeneration confirms that the reuse of the foams was feasible with a small mass loss, even after 9 cycles. In the one-pass mode, for alginate foams, a slower flow rate led to a smaller saturation volume, while the effect of flow rate was less marked for AB foams. Competitive study suggests that the foams have a preference for Pb(II) over Cu(II) but cannot selectively remove Pb(II) from the binary solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Compounds Used in Biosorption)
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