Special Issue "Network and Rateless Coding for Video Streaming"

A special issue of Information (ISSN 2078-2489). This special issue belongs to the section "Information and Communications Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Nikolaos Thomos

University of Essex, Colchester, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: network coding; multimedia communications; networking; joint source and channel coding; device-to-device communication; signal processing; sensor networks
Guest Editor
Dr. Martin Fleury

School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex, Colchester CO4 3SQ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: multimedia networks; video streaming over wireless networks; P2P streaming; video coding; video security
Guest Editor
Dr. Dimitris Kanellopoulos

Department of Mathematics, University of Patras, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Interests: multimedia networks; wireless ad hoc networks; P2P streaming; delay-sensitive multimedia networking with network coding

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Network Coding (NC) has been approached from a multitude of disciplines, such as information theory, channel coding theory, optimization theory, and graph theory. NC (together with means of decoding at the receiver) outperforms traditional routing by improving the network throughput and minimizing the delay. NC can be applied to many forms of network communications including multicasting, while various applications could benefit from it. Such applications are content delivery through Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks, video streaming, live broadcast, distributed content storage, content caching, interactive communications (e.g., multimedia conferencing) and so on.

This Special Issue focuses on all these aspects of NC, and especially those that are suitable for video streaming.

Prospective authors are invited to submit previously unpublished works in these areas. Topics of interest include, but are not restricted to:

  • NC for video streaming and video content delivery.
  • NC schemes for multi-sender video streaming.
  • Multimedia delivery in 5G and beyond networks using NC.
  • Design of NC for P2P streaming.
  • Rateless codes for multimedia delivery.
  • Design of Rateless codes for time constrained applications.
  • Low cost network coding schemes for time constrained applications
  • High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC).
  • Cross-sensor coding techniques.
  • NC schemes for improving multimedia group synchronization.

Dr. Nikolaos Thomos
Dr. Martin Fleury
Dr. Dimitris Kanellopoulos
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Network coding
  • Video streaming
  • Multi-view video coding
  • Video content delivery

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Random Linear Network Coding for 5G Mobile Video Delivery
Information 2018, 9(4), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/info9040072
Received: 14 February 2018 / Revised: 17 March 2018 / Accepted: 27 March 2018 / Published: 28 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1069 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An exponential increase in mobile video delivery will continue with the demand for higher resolution, multi-view and large-scale multicast video services. Novel fifth generation (5G) 3GPP New Radio (NR) standard will bring a number of new opportunities for optimizing video delivery across both
[...] Read more.
An exponential increase in mobile video delivery will continue with the demand for higher resolution, multi-view and large-scale multicast video services. Novel fifth generation (5G) 3GPP New Radio (NR) standard will bring a number of new opportunities for optimizing video delivery across both 5G core and radio access networks. One of the promising approaches for video quality adaptation, throughput enhancement and erasure protection is the use of packet-level random linear network coding (RLNC). In this review paper, we discuss the integration of RLNC into the 5G NR standard, building upon the ideas and opportunities identified in 4G LTE. We explicitly identify and discuss in detail novel 5G NR features that provide support for RLNC-based video delivery in 5G, thus pointing out to the promising avenues for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network and Rateless Coding for Video Streaming)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle On the Performance of the Cache Coding Protocol
Information 2018, 9(3), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/info9030062
Received: 1 February 2018 / Revised: 7 March 2018 / Accepted: 8 March 2018 / Published: 10 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1768 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Network coding approaches typically consider an unrestricted recoding of coded packets in the relay nodes to increase performance. However, this can expose the system to pollution attacks that cannot be detected during transmission, until the receivers attempt to recover the data. To prevent
[...] Read more.
Network coding approaches typically consider an unrestricted recoding of coded packets in the relay nodes to increase performance. However, this can expose the system to pollution attacks that cannot be detected during transmission, until the receivers attempt to recover the data. To prevent these attacks while allowing for the benefits of coding in mesh networks, the cache coding protocol was proposed. This protocol only allows recoding at the relays when the relay has received enough coded packets to decode an entire generation of packets. At that point, the relay node recodes and signs the recoded packets with its own private key, allowing the system to detect and minimize the effect of pollution attacks and making the relays accountable for changes on the data. This paper analyzes the delay performance of cache coding to understand the security-performance trade-off of this scheme. We introduce an analytical model for the case of two relays in an erasure channel relying on an absorbing Markov chain and an approximate model to estimate the performance in terms of the number of transmissions before successfully decoding at the receiver. We confirm our analysis using simulation results. We show that cache coding can overcome the security issues of unrestricted recoding with only a moderate decrease in system performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network and Rateless Coding for Video Streaming)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Efficient Delivery of Scalable Video Using a Streaming Class Model
Information 2018, 9(3), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/info9030059
Received: 7 February 2018 / Revised: 1 March 2018 / Accepted: 6 March 2018 / Published: 8 March 2018
PDF Full-text (1878 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
When we couple the rise in video streaming with the growing number of portable devices (smart phones, tablets, laptops), we see an ever-increasing demand for high-definition video online while on the move. Wireless networks are inherently characterised by restricted shared bandwidth and relatively
[...] Read more.
When we couple the rise in video streaming with the growing number of portable devices (smart phones, tablets, laptops), we see an ever-increasing demand for high-definition video online while on the move. Wireless networks are inherently characterised by restricted shared bandwidth and relatively high error loss rates, thus presenting a challenge for the efficient delivery of high quality video. Additionally, mobile devices can support/demand a range of video resolutions and qualities. This demand for mobile streaming highlights the need for adaptive video streaming schemes that can adjust to available bandwidth and heterogeneity, and can provide a graceful changes in video quality, all while respecting viewing satisfaction. In this context, the use of well-known scalable/layered media streaming techniques, commonly known as scalable video coding (SVC), is an attractive solution. SVC encodes a number of video quality levels within a single media stream. This has been shown to be an especially effective and efficient solution, but it fares badly in the presence of datagram losses. While multiple description coding (MDC) can reduce the effects of packet loss on scalable video delivery, the increased delivery cost is counterproductive for constrained networks. This situation is accentuated in cases where only the lower quality level is required. In this paper, we assess these issues and propose a new approach called Streaming Classes (SC) through which we can define a key set of quality levels, each of which can be delivered in a self-contained manner. This facilitates efficient delivery, yielding reduced transmission byte-cost for devices requiring lower quality, relative to MDC and Adaptive Layer Distribution (ALD) (42% and 76% respective reduction for layer 2), while also maintaining high levels of consistent quality. We also illustrate how selective packetisation technique can further reduce the effects of packet loss on viewable quality by leveraging the increase in the number of frames per group of pictures (GOP), while offering a means of reducing overall error correction and by providing equality of data in every packet transmitted per GOP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Network and Rateless Coding for Video Streaming)
Figures

Figure 1

Back to Top