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Special Issue "Regional Scale Industrial Contamination of Soils and Groundwater — From Risk Assessment to Risk Management"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Serge Brouyère (Website)

Dpt ArGEnCo, Geo³-Hydrogéologie & Aquapôle, Université de Liège, Bâtiment B52/3, 4000 Sart Tilman, Belgium
Fax: +32 43 669520
Interests: pollution–protection–remediation of soils and groundwater; flow and transport modelling in variably saturated media; development and application of field investigation techniques; development of tools and concepts for the management of groundwater in the context of integrated water resources management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Growing industrial activities and urbanization have lead to the multiplication of pollution sources and to widespread dispersion of contaminants in the environment, leading at the extreme to regional scale contamination of soils and groundwater. The regional component of the problem requires specific approaches from risk assessment to risk management steps. This special issue is to describe recent research advances in this context: development of regional-scale risk assessment methods and indicators, including water quality trends at the scale of the surface water / groundwater body, megasite approaches and, more specifically, methodologies specifically devoted to risk management and remediation at the the regional level.

Dr. Serge Brouyère
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • regional scale risk assessment
  • megasite
  • soil and groundwater pollution
  • EU Water Directive

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Health Risk-Based Assessment and Management of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Soil Sites in Taiwan
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(10), 3595-3614; doi:10.3390/ijerph7103596
Received: 17 August 2010 / Revised: 31 August 2010 / Accepted: 27 September 2010 / Published: 11 October 2010
Cited by 24 | PDF Full-text (213 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Risk-based assessment is a way to evaluate the potential hazards of contaminated sites and is based on considering linkages between pollution sources, pathways, and receptors. These linkages can be broken by source reduction, pathway management, and modifying exposure of the receptors. In [...] Read more.
Risk-based assessment is a way to evaluate the potential hazards of contaminated sites and is based on considering linkages between pollution sources, pathways, and receptors. These linkages can be broken by source reduction, pathway management, and modifying exposure of the receptors. In Taiwan, the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act (SGWPR Act) uses one target regulation to evaluate the contamination status of soil and groundwater pollution. More than 600 sites contaminated with heavy metals (HMs) have been remediated and the costs of this process are always high. Besides using soil remediation techniques to remove contaminants from these sites, the selection of possible remediation methods to obtain rapid risk reduction is permissible and of increasing interest. This paper discusses previous soil remediation techniques applied to different sites in Taiwan and also clarified the differences of risk assessment before and after soil remediation obtained by applying different risk assessment models. This paper also includes many case studies on: (1) food safety risk assessment for brown rice growing in a HMs-contaminated site; (2) a tiered approach to health risk assessment for a contaminated site; (3) risk assessment for phytoremediation techniques applied in HMs-contaminated sites; and (4) soil remediation cost analysis for contaminated sites in Taiwan. Full article
Open AccessArticle Comparative Assessment of Soil Contamination by Lead and Heavy Metals in Riparian and Agricultural Areas (Southern Québec, Canada)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(8), 3100-3114; doi:10.3390/ijerph7083100
Received: 22 June 2010 / Revised: 29 July 2010 / Accepted: 2 August 2010 / Published: 5 August 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (486 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons (C10–C50), PAHS, lead and other heavy metals were recently found in the banks of two major rivers in southern Québec. Alluvial soils are contaminated over a distance of 100 kilometers. Eight sampling sites, including [...] Read more.
Soils contaminated with hydrocarbons (C10–C50), PAHS, lead and other heavy metals were recently found in the banks of two major rivers in southern Québec. Alluvial soils are contaminated over a distance of 100 kilometers. Eight sampling sites, including some located in agriculture areas (farm woodlots) have been selected to compare air pollution (aerosol fallout and rainout) and river pollution values. The concentrations detected in soil profiles for As, Cd and Pb vary between 3.01 to 37.88 mg kg−1 (As), 0.11 to 0.81 mg kg−1 (Cd) 12.32 to 149.13 mg kg−1 (Pb). These metallic elements are considered highly toxic and can harm wildlife and human health at high levels. The maximum concentration of Pb (149.13 mg kg−1) in soils of the riparian zone is twelve times higher than the average Pb concentration found in a natural state evaluated at 15.3 mg kg−1 (SD 17.5). Pb concentrations in soils of agricultural areas (woodland control sites) range between 12 and 22 mg kg−1, and given that these values are recorded in surrounding cultivated land, the issue of the quality of agricultural products (crops and forage) to feed livestock or destined for human consumption must be further addressed in detail. Full article

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