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Special Issue "Insurance and Health"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Services and Health Economics Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2017

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Luke Connelly

University of Queensland, Centre for the Business and Economics of Health, Brisbane, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: health economics and insurance economics and the effects of institutions (including legal constructs) on incentives and behaviour

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleague,

The International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) has commissioned a Special Issue on Health Insurance and Health. Health insurance is an important distal determinant of health status; health status itself may also exert an important influence over individuals’ insurance decisions, and correlated factors (such as risk aversion) may be correlated with both health outcomes and insurance choices.

This Special Issue focuses on the linkages between health insurance and health itself, but its remit is broad and extends to the management of risk in relation to a range of environmental and public health challenges. Submissions from a range of social science and health-related disciplines is encouraged (e.g., law, economics, public health epidemiology, environmental science, and so on).

The scope of this Special Issue includes, but is not limited to the relationships between:

  • health insurance, human behaviour and health and other social outcomes;
  • life insurance, human behaviour, and health and other social outcomes;
  • residential aged care insurance and other forms of insurance and their effects on health and other social outcomes;
  • compulsory third-party (e.g., auto) insurance schemes and their relationship to health and other social outcomes;
  • workers’ compensation schemes and their relationship to health and other social outcomes;
  • risk management practices that affect food security, biosecurity and other potential challenges to human health;
  • adverse selection in health insurance and other insurance markets, and its effects on market and health outcomes;
  • moral hazard in health and other insurance markets that may affect health outcomes;
  • insurer and service provider behaviour, market outcomes and health outcomes in markets affected by insurance;
  • consumer behaviour, market outcomes and health outcomes in markets affected by insurance;
  • public policy and regulation and their effects on insurance markets and health outcomes.

Public and private insurance arrangements are of equal interest; as are interactions between public and private insurance schemes and the outcomes these produce.

Prof. Luke B. Connelly
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • moral hazard
  • adverse selection
  • insurance
  • health
  • compensation
  • consumer behaviour
  • producer behaviour
  • regulation
  • market outcomes
  • policy
  • regulation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Socioeconomic Differences in and Predictors of Home-Based Palliative Care Health Service Use in Ontario, Canada
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 802; doi:10.3390/ijerph14070802
Received: 19 June 2017 / Revised: 10 July 2017 / Accepted: 13 July 2017 / Published: 18 July 2017
PDF Full-text (294 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of health services may vary across people with different socioeconomic statuses, and may be determined by many factors. The purposes of this study were (i) to examine the socioeconomic differences in the propensity and intensity of use for three main home-based
[...] Read more.
The use of health services may vary across people with different socioeconomic statuses, and may be determined by many factors. The purposes of this study were (i) to examine the socioeconomic differences in the propensity and intensity of use for three main home-based health services, that is, home-based palliative care physician visits, nurse visits and personal support worker (PSW) hours; and (ii) to explore the determinants of the use of home-based palliative care services. A prospective cohort study was employed. A total of 181 caregivers were interviewed biweekly over the course of the palliative care trajectory, yielding a total of 994 interviews. The propensity and intensity of health service use were examined using logistic regression and negative binomial regression, respectively. The results demonstrated that both the propensity and intensity of home-based nurse and PSW visits fell with socioeconomic status. The use of home-based palliative care services was not concentrated in high socioeconomic status groups. The common predictors of health service use in the three service categories were patient age, the Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) score and place of death. These findings may assist health service planners in the appropriate allocation of resources and service packages to meet the complex needs of palliative care populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insurance and Health)

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St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
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Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
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