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Special Issue "Green Transportation"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2011)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Bert Van Wee

Faculty of Technology and Management, Delft University of Technology, Kamer C3.100, Jaffalaan 5, 2628 BX Delft, The Netherlands
Website | E-Mail
Phone: (+) 31 (0)15 2781144
Interests: long-term developments in transport; the environment; safety and accessibility in policy analyses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Transportation comes at a high cost for society in terms of environmental pressure. Contrary to other sectors its share in GHG-emissions is increasing rapidly. The oil dependency of the sector is huge which could cause major problems considering the depletion of fossil fuels.  Emissions of pollutants are decreasing but health standards are still exceeded at many places. In many countries between 20-30% per the population experiences noise nuisance, and this fraction is quite stable.

The journal encourages the submission of high-quality and original scientific research papers focusing on options to improve the sector’s environmental performance.  Subjects for papers could be

  • new technologies and their potential, as well as possible market penetrations, including hybrids, electric vehicles, hydrogen, biofuels
  • travel demand management
  • implementation of innovations to green transport and effects
  • changes in environmental pressure and health impacts
  • long term trends, forecast, scenarios

Prof. Dr. Bert Van Wee
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • transport
  • environment
  • scenarios
  • policy
  • technology
  • climate change
  • oil dependency
  • air pollution
  • health impacts

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Analysis of Technological Innovation and Environmental Performance Improvement in Aviation Sector
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(9), 3777-3795; doi:10.3390/ijerph8093777
Received: 30 December 2010 / Revised: 17 August 2011 / Accepted: 6 September 2011 / Published: 22 September 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (473 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The past oil crises have caused dramatic improvements in fuel efficiency in all industrial sectors. The aviation sector—aircraft manufacturers and airlines—has also made significant efforts to improve the fuel efficiency through more advanced jet engines, high-lift wing designs, and lighter airframe materials. However,
[...] Read more.
The past oil crises have caused dramatic improvements in fuel efficiency in all industrial sectors. The aviation sector—aircraft manufacturers and airlines—has also made significant efforts to improve the fuel efficiency through more advanced jet engines, high-lift wing designs, and lighter airframe materials. However, the innovations in energy-saving aircraft technologies do not coincide with the oil crisis periods. The largest improvement in aircraft fuel efficiency took place in the 1960s while the high oil prices in the 1970s and on did not induce manufacturers or airlines to achieve a faster rate of innovation. In this paper, we employ a historical analysis to examine the socio-economic reasons behind the relatively slow technological innovation in aircraft fuel efficiency over the last 40 years. Based on the industry and passenger behaviors studied and prospects for alternative fuel options, this paper offers insights for the aviation sector to shift toward more sustainable technological options in the medium term. Second-generation biofuels could be the feasible option with a meaningful reduction in aviation’s lifecycle environmental impact if they can achieve sufficient economies of scale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Transportation)
Open AccessArticle Environmentally Reformed Travel Habits During the 2006 Congestion Charge Trial in Stockholm—A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(8), 3202-3215; doi:10.3390/ijerph8083202
Received: 13 June 2011 / Revised: 18 July 2011 / Accepted: 25 July 2011 / Published: 2 August 2011
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (201 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Policy measures that reduce or replace road traffic can improve environmental conditions in most large cities. In Stockholm a congestion charge was introduced during a test period in 2006. This was a full-scale trial that proved to meet its targets by reducing traffic
[...] Read more.
Policy measures that reduce or replace road traffic can improve environmental conditions in most large cities. In Stockholm a congestion charge was introduced during a test period in 2006. This was a full-scale trial that proved to meet its targets by reducing traffic crossing the inner city segment during rush hours by 20%. Emissions of carbon dioxide and particles were also substantially reduced. This study, based on in-depth interviews with 40 inhabitants, analyses how and why new travel habits emerged. The results show that particular, sometimes unexpected, features of everyday life (habits, resources, opportunities, values, etc.) were crucial for adjustment of travel behaviour in relation to the policy instrument. One example was that those accustomed to mixing different modes of transport on a daily basis more easily adapted their travel in the targeted way. On a more general level, the results revealed that the policy measure could actually tip the scales for the individual towards trying out a new behaviour. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Transportation)
Open AccessArticle Global Scenarios of Air Pollutant Emissions from Road Transport through to 2050
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8(7), 3032-3062; doi:10.3390/ijerph8073032
Received: 9 May 2011 / Revised: 17 July 2011 / Accepted: 18 July 2011 / Published: 22 July 2011
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (826 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper presents global scenarios of sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate matter (PM) emissions from road transport through to 2050, taking into account the potential impacts of: (1) the timing of air pollutant emission regulation implementation
[...] Read more.
This paper presents global scenarios of sulphur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and particulate matter (PM) emissions from road transport through to 2050, taking into account the potential impacts of: (1) the timing of air pollutant emission regulation implementation in developing countries; (2) global CO2 mitigation policy implementation; and (3) vehicle cost assumptions, on study results. This is done by using a global energy system model treating the transport sector in detail. The major conclusions are the following. First, as long as non-developed countries adopt the same vehicle emission standards as in developed countries within a 30-year lag, global emissions of SO2, NOx, and PM from road vehicles decrease substantially over time. Second, light-duty vehicles and heavy-duty trucks make a large and increasing contribution to future global emissions of SO2, NOx, and PM from road vehicles. Third, the timing of air pollutant emission regulation implementation in developing countries has a large impact on future global emissions of SO2, NOx, and PM from road vehicles, whereas there is a possibility that global CO2 mitigation policy implementation has a comparatively small impact on them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Transportation)

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