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Special Issue "Recent Advances in Environmental Research"

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A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Editor-in-Chief
Prof. Dr. Paul B. Tchounwou

Molecular Toxicology Research Laboratory, Jackson State University, 1400 Lynch Street, Box 18750, Jackson, MI 39217, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 601 979 2349

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Hyperspectral Indices for Chlorophyll-a Concentration Estimation in Tangxun Lake (Wuhan, China)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(6), 2437-2451; doi:10.3390/ijerph7062437
Received: 1 April 2010 / Revised: 17 May 2010 / Accepted: 18 May 2010 / Published: 27 May 2010
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (756 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration is a major indicator of water quality which is harmful to human health. A growing number of studies have focused on the derivation of Chl-a concentration information from hyperspectral sensor data and the identification of best
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Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration is a major indicator of water quality which is harmful to human health. A growing number of studies have focused on the derivation of Chl-a concentration information from hyperspectral sensor data and the identification of best indices for Chl-a monitoring. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of hyperspectral indices to detect Chl-a concentrations in Tangxun Lake, which is the second largest lake in Wuhan, Central China. Hyperspectral reflectance and Chl-a concentration were measured at ten sample sites in Tangxun Lake. Three types of hyperspectral methods, including single-band reflectance, first derivative of reflectance, and reflectance ratio, were extracted from the spectral profiles of all bands of the hyperspectral sensor. The most appropriate bands for algorithms mentioned above were selected based on the correlation analysis. Evaluation results indicated that two methods, the first derivative of reflectance and reflectance ratio, were highly correlated (R2 > 0.8) with the measured Chl-a concentrations. Thus, the spatial and temporal variations of Chl-a concentration could be conveniently monitored with these hyperspectral methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Environmental Research)
Open AccessArticle Implementation of a 3D Coupled Hydrodynamic and Contaminant Fate Model for PCDD/Fs in Thau Lagoon (France): The Importance of Atmospheric Sources of Contamination
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(4), 1467-1485; doi:10.3390/ijerph7041467
Received: 21 January 2010 / Revised: 8 March 2010 / Accepted: 9 March 2010 / Published: 30 March 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (752 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
A 3D hydrodynamic and contaminant fate model was implemented for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in Thau lagoon. The hydrodynamic model was tested against temperature and salinity measurements, while the contaminant fate model was assessed against available data collected at different
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A 3D hydrodynamic and contaminant fate model was implemented for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in Thau lagoon. The hydrodynamic model was tested against temperature and salinity measurements, while the contaminant fate model was assessed against available data collected at different stations inside the lagoon. The model results allow an assessment of the spatial and temporal variability of the distribution of contaminants in the lagoon, the seasonality of loads and the role of atmospheric deposition for the input of PCDD/Fs. The outcome suggests that air is an important source of PCDD/Fs for this ecosystem, therefore the monitoring of air pollution is very appropriate for assessing the inputs of these contaminants. These results call for the development of integrated environmental protection policies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Environmental Research)
Open AccessArticle Heavy Metals in Soil and Crops of an Intensively Farmed Area: A Case Study in Yucheng City, Shandong Province, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(2), 395-412; doi:10.3390/ijerph7020395
Received: 25 December 2009 / Accepted: 27 January 2010 / Published: 1 February 2010
Cited by 42 | PDF Full-text (731 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Yucheng City is located in northwestern Shandong Province, China, and is situated on the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain, the largest alluvial plain in China. In this study, 86 surface soil samples were collected in Yucheng City and analyzed for cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic
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Yucheng City is located in northwestern Shandong Province, China, and is situated on the Huang-Huai-Hai Plain, the largest alluvial plain in China. In this study, 86 surface soil samples were collected in Yucheng City and analyzed for cation exchange capacity (CEC), soil organic matter (SOM), pH, available phosphorus (avail. P), phosphorus (P), aluminum (Al), and iron (Fe). These soils were also analyzed for ‘total’ chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb), together with 92 wheat samples and 37 corn samples. There was no obvious heavy metal contamination in the soil and irrigation water. But the long-term accumulation of heavy metals in soil has lead to an increase of Ni, As, Hg and Pb concentrations in some of wheat and corn samples and Cd in wheat samples. Because of the numerous sources of soil heavy metals and the lower level of heavy metal in irrigation water, there is no significant relation between soil heavy metal concentrations and irrigation water concentrations. Cr, Ni were mainly from the indigenous clay minerals according to multivariate analysis. Little contribution to soil heavy metal contents from agricultural fertilizer use was found and the local anomalies of As, Cd, Hg, Pb in wheat and corn grain are attributed to the interactive effects of irrigation and fertilizer used. Aerial Hg, however may also be the source of Hg for soil, wheat and corn. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Environmental Research)
Open AccessArticle Maternal Cigarette Smoking during Pregnancy and Offspring Externalizing Behavioral Problems: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(1), 146-163; doi:10.3390/ijerph7010146
Received: 30 December 2009 / Accepted: 12 January 2010 / Published: 14 January 2010
Cited by 26 | PDF Full-text (250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A body of empirical research has revealed that prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke is related to a host of negative outcomes, including reduced cognitive abilities, later-life health problems, and childhood behavioral problems. While these findings are often interpreted as evidence of the causal
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A body of empirical research has revealed that prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke is related to a host of negative outcomes, including reduced cognitive abilities, later-life health problems, and childhood behavioral problems. While these findings are often interpreted as evidence of the causal role that prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke has on human phenotypes, emerging evidence has suggested that the association between prenatal exposure to tobacco smoke and behavioral phenotypes may be spurious. The current analysis of data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) revealed that the association between prenatal exposure to cigarette smoke and externalizing behavioral problems was fully accounted for by confounding factors. The implications that these findings have for policy and research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Environmental Research)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Disturbance and Plant Succession in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of the American Southwest
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2010, 7(4), 1248-1284; doi:10.3390/ijerph7041248
Received: 22 December 2009 / Revised: 23 March 2010 / Accepted: 24 March 2010 / Published: 25 March 2010
Cited by 41 | PDF Full-text (1233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Disturbances such as fire, land clearing, and road building remove vegetation and can have major influences on public health through effects on air quality, aesthetics, recreational opportunities, natural resource availability, and economics. Plant recovery and succession following disturbance are poorly understood in arid
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Disturbances such as fire, land clearing, and road building remove vegetation and can have major influences on public health through effects on air quality, aesthetics, recreational opportunities, natural resource availability, and economics. Plant recovery and succession following disturbance are poorly understood in arid lands relative to more temperate regions. This study quantitatively reviewed vegetation reestablishment following a variety of disturbances in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of southwestern North America. A total of 47 studies met inclusion criteria for the review. The time estimated by 29 individual studies for full reestablishment of total perennial plant cover was 76 years. Although long, this time was shorter than an estimated 215 years (among 31 individual studies) required for the recovery of species composition typical of undisturbed areas, assuming that recovery remains linear following the longest time since disturbance measurement made by the studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Environmental Research)
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