Special Issue "Bacterial Genetics and Ecology Inspire the Biotechnology of an Evolving Global Economy"

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A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Technologies and Resources for Genetics (including Tools, Software and Databases)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2011)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Amalia D. Karagouni

Microbiology Group, Department of Botany, School of Sciences, Faculty of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, 157 01 Athens, Greece
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Guest Editor
Prof. Dimitris G. Hatzinikolaou

Laboratory of Microbiology, Sector of Botany, Department of Biology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Zografou Campus, 15784 Zografou, Attica, Greece
E-Mail
Phone: +30 210 7274140

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The eleventh conference of "BAGECO" will be held in the island of Corfu in Greece next May 2011 (www.bageco11.org). Following the tradition of BAGECO meetings, in the program of BAGECO11 it has been included themes like Molecular Biology for the Environment, The Microbial Environment and Human Health, Micro-environment and Plant Health, Marine Ecosystems and Health. In addition, a full day session on Synthetic Biology as roundtable discussion has been organized with excellent invited speakers who will cover all issues concerning the new avenues which Synthetic Biology opens for Microbial Ecology/Genetics/Biotechnology and opinions about those issues that affect science, technology and socioeconomics. Finally, the Third Generation Sequencing Technology will be covered in the corresponding session.

Prof. Dr. Amalia D. Karagouni
Prof. Dimitris G. Hatzinikolaou
Guest Editors

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Comparison of the Fecal Microbiota in Feral and Domestic Goats
Genes 2012, 3(1), 1-18; doi:10.3390/genes3010001
Received: 2 November 2011 / Revised: 22 November 2011 / Accepted: 28 November 2011 / Published: 21 December 2011
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1739 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Animals have co-evolved with mutualistic microbial communities, known as the microbiota, which are essential for organ development and function. We hypothesize that modern animal husbandry practices exert an impact on the intestinal microbiota. In this study, we compared the structure of the fecal
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Animals have co-evolved with mutualistic microbial communities, known as the microbiota, which are essential for organ development and function. We hypothesize that modern animal husbandry practices exert an impact on the intestinal microbiota. In this study, we compared the structure of the fecal microbiota between feral and domestic goats using the G2 PhyloChip and assessed the presence of five tetracycline resistance genes [tet(M), tet(S), tet(O), tet(Q) and tet(W)] by PCR. Feces were collected from 10 goats: 5 domestic from a farm in the main island of Puerto Rico and 5 feral from the remote dry island of Mona. There were 42 bacterial phyla from 153 families detected in the goats’ feces. A total of 84 PhyloChip-OTUs were different in the fecal microbiota of feral and domestic goat. Both feral and domestic goats carried antibiotic resistance genes tet(O) and tet(W), but domestic goats additionally carried tet(Q). Diet, host genetics and antibiotic exposure are likely determinant factors in shaping the intestinal microbiota and may explain the differences observed between feral and domestic goats fecal microbiota. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Occurrence of Plasmids in the Aromatic Degrading Bacterioplankton of the Baltic Sea
Genes 2011, 2(4), 853-868; doi:10.3390/genes2040853
Received: 16 August 2011 / Revised: 23 September 2011 / Accepted: 20 October 2011 / Published: 4 November 2011
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (216 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Plasmids are mobile genetic elements that provide their hosts with many beneficial traits including in some cases the ability to degrade different aromatic compounds. To fulfill the knowledge gap regarding catabolic plasmids of the Baltic Sea water, a total of 209 biodegrading bacterial
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Plasmids are mobile genetic elements that provide their hosts with many beneficial traits including in some cases the ability to degrade different aromatic compounds. To fulfill the knowledge gap regarding catabolic plasmids of the Baltic Sea water, a total of 209 biodegrading bacterial strains were isolated and screened for the presence of these mobile genetic elements. We found that both large and small plasmids are common in the cultivable Baltic Sea bacterioplankton and are particularly prevalent among bacterial genera Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter. Out of 61 plasmid-containing strains (29% of all isolates), 34 strains were found to carry large plasmids, which could be associated with the biodegradative capabilities of the host bacterial strains. Focusing on the diversity of IncP-9 plasmids, self-transmissible m-toluate (TOL) and salicylate (SAL) plasmids were detected. Sequencing the repA gene of IncP-9 carrying isolates revealed a high diversity within IncP-9 plasmid family, as well as extended the assumed bacterial host species range of the IncP-9 representatives. This study is the first insight into the genetic pool of the IncP-9 catabolic plasmids in the Baltic Sea bacterioplankton. Full article
Open AccessArticle Proteomics Analysis of the Effects of Cyanate on Chromobacterium violaceum Metabolism
Genes 2011, 2(4), 736-747; doi:10.3390/genes2040736
Received: 15 August 2011 / Revised: 26 September 2011 / Accepted: 28 September 2011 / Published: 19 October 2011
PDF Full-text (860 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Chromobacterium violaceum is a gram-negative betaproteobacterium that has been isolated from various Brazilian ecosystems. Its genome contains the cyn operon, which gives it the ability to metabolize highly toxic cyanate into ammonium and carbon dioxide. We used a proteomics approach to investigate the
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Chromobacterium violaceum is a gram-negative betaproteobacterium that has been isolated from various Brazilian ecosystems. Its genome contains the cyn operon, which gives it the ability to metabolize highly toxic cyanate into ammonium and carbon dioxide. We used a proteomics approach to investigate the effects of cyanate on the metabolism of this bacterium. The proteome of cells grown with and without cyanate was compared on 2-D gels. Differential spots were digested and identified by mass spectrometry. The bacterium was able to grow at concentrations of up to 1 mM cyanate. Eighteen spots were differentially expressed in the presence of cyanate, of which 16 were downregulated and only two were upregulated. An additional 12 spots were detected only in extracts of cells unexposed to cyanate, and one was expressed only by the exposed cells. Fourteen spots were identified, corresponding to 13 different proteins. We conclude that cyanate promotes expression of enzymes that combat oxidative stress and represses enzymes of the citric acid cycle, strongly affecting the energetic metabolism of the cell. Other proteins that were under-expressed in bacteria exposed to cyanate are involved in amino-acid metabolism or are hypothetical proteins, demonstrating that cyanate also affects expression of genes that are not part of the cyn operon. Full article

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