Special Issue "QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks"

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A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2010)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Fernando Cerdán (Website)

Department of Information Technologies and Communications, Polytechnic University of Cartagena, Antiguo Cuartel de Antigones (Campus Muralla del Mar), Plaza del Hospital 1, 30202 Cartagena, Spain
Interests: QoS in wired and wireless IP networks; deployment of ubiquitous services and applications; engineering education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Today, QoS is undoubtedly a key element in any packet network technology. Despite of important advances in QoS in communication networks, IP QoS is still an issue that challenges the scientific community. Current networks are deeply heterogeneous as well as future networks. The IP protocol, the main piece of Internet, plays a decisive role, since has been chosen to provide the interconnection framework among the multiple existing and emerging technologies. QoS requires a study end to end by access networks and their interconnections. Service convergence and integration needs a network able to match user contracts with traffic control and traffic management in the global IP network, even when the user moves changing the access technology. Apart from original papers in basic research for providing IP end to end QoS over wired and wireless networks, this special issue also will pay special attention to papers providing studies on efficiently support applications such as voice over IP (VoIP), video streaming, music downloading and many others, and studies devoted to performance evaluation on QoS architectures for emerging networks such as IPTV, body networks and wearable networks.

Prof. Dr. Fernando Cerdán
Guest Editor

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle An Intrinsic TE Approach for End-to-End QoS Provisioning in OBS Networks Using Static Load-Balanced Routing Strategies
Future Internet 2010, 2(4), 559-586; doi:10.3390/fi2040559
Received: 9 October 2010 / Revised: 21 October 2010 / Accepted: 21 October 2010 / Published: 22 October 2010
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Abstract
Optical burst switching provides a feasible paradigm for the next IP over optical backbones. However its burst loss performance can be highly affected by burst contention. In this paper we discuss traffic engineering approaches for path selection with the objective tominimize contention [...] Read more.
Optical burst switching provides a feasible paradigm for the next IP over optical backbones. However its burst loss performance can be highly affected by burst contention. In this paper we discuss traffic engineering approaches for path selection with the objective tominimize contention using only topological information. The discussed strategies are based on balancing the traffic across the network in order to reduce congestion without incurring into link state protocol penalties. The routing strategies are evaluated by simulation on an optical burst switching model specifically developed for the purpose with OMNeT++. Results show that our strategies outperform the traditionally used shortest path routing to an extent that depends on the network connectivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)
Open AccessArticle Deficit Round Robin with Fragmentation Scheduling to Achieve Generalized Weighted Fairness for Resource Allocation in IEEE 802.16e Mobile WiMAX Networks
Future Internet 2010, 2(4), 446-468; doi:10.3390/fi2040446
Received: 22 September 2010 / Revised: 2 October 2010 / Accepted: 12 October 2010 / Published: 12 October 2010
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Abstract
Deficit Round Robin (DRR) is a fair packet-based scheduling discipline commonly used in wired networks where link capacities do not change with time. However, in wireless networks, especially wireless broadband networks, i.e., IEEE 802.16e Mobile WiMAX, there are two main considerations [...] Read more.
Deficit Round Robin (DRR) is a fair packet-based scheduling discipline commonly used in wired networks where link capacities do not change with time. However, in wireless networks, especially wireless broadband networks, i.e., IEEE 802.16e Mobile WiMAX, there are two main considerations violate the packet-based service concept for DRR. First, the resources are allocated per Mobile WiMAX frame. To achieve full frame utilization, Mobile WiMAX allows packets to be fragmented. Second, due to a high variation in wireless channel conditions, the link/channel capacity can change over time and location. Therefore, we introduce a Deficit Round Robin with Fragmentation (DRRF) to allocate resources per Mobile WiMAX frame in a fair manner by allowing for varying link capacity and for transmitting fragmented packets. Similar to DRR and Generalized Processor Sharing (GPS), DRRF achieves perfect fairness. DRRF results in a higher throughput than DRR (80% improvement) while causing less overhead than GPS (8 times less than GPS). In addition, in Mobile WiMAX, the quality of service (QoS) offered by service providers is associated with the price paid. This is similar to a cellular phone system; the users may be required to pay air-time charges. Hence, we have also formalized a Generalized Weighted Fairness (GWF) criterion which equalizes a weighted sum of service time units or slots, called temporal fairness, and transmitted bytes, called throughput fairness, for customers who are located in a poor channel condition or at a further distance versus for those who are near the base stations, or have a good channel condition. We use DRRF to demonstrate the application of GWF. These fairness criteria are used to satisfy basic requirements for resource allocation, especially for non real-time traffic. Therefore, we also extend DRRF to support other QoS requirements, such as minimum reserved traffic rate, maximum sustained traffic rate, and traffic priority. For real-time traffic, i.e., video traffic, we compare the performance of DRRF with deadline enforcement to that of Earliest Deadline First (EDF). The results show that DRRF outperforms EDF (higher achievable throughput under the promised delay latency) and maintains fairness under an overload scenario. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)
Open AccessArticle Anticipation of Traffic Demands to Guarantee QoS in IP/Optical Networks
Future Internet 2010, 2(3), 417-430; doi:10.3390/fi2030417
Received: 21 August 2010 / Revised: 2 September 2010 / Accepted: 2 September 2010 / Published: 21 September 2010
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Abstract
Traffic in the Internet backbone is expected to grow above a few Tbit/s in 2020. To cope with this, operators are moving to IP/optical network architectures, where IP is the convergence layer for all services. On the other hand, the quality of [...] Read more.
Traffic in the Internet backbone is expected to grow above a few Tbit/s in 2020. To cope with this, operators are moving to IP/optical network architectures, where IP is the convergence layer for all services. On the other hand, the quality of service (QoS) requirements of future applications encompasses the individualization of services and the assurance of stricter quality parameters such as latency, jitter or capacity. In other words, future optical networks will not only transport more IP data, but they will also have to offer differentiated QoS requirements to services. Finally, some emerging applications, e.g., grid computing, need greater flexibility in the usage of network resources, which involves establishing and releasing connections as if they were virtualized resources controlled by other elements or layers. In this context, traffic-driven lightpath provisioning and service-plane approaches arise as very interesting candidate solutions to solve the main challenges described above. This work reviews the concepts of service-oriented and self-managed networks and relates them to propose an integrated approach to assure QoS by offering flow-aware networking in the sense that traffic demands will be anticipated in a suitable way, lightpaths will be established taking into account QoS information (i.e., impairments) and complex services will be decomposed into optical connections so that the above techniques can be employed to assure QoS for any service. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)
Open AccessArticle Dynamic Resource Allocation and QoS Control Capabilities of the Japanese Academic Backbone Network
Future Internet 2010, 2(3), 295-307; doi:10.3390/fi2030295
Received: 22 July 2010 / Accepted: 5 August 2010 / Published: 9 August 2010
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Abstract
Dynamic resource control capabilities have become increasingly important for academic networks that must support big scientific research projects at the same time as less data intensive research and educational activities. This paper describes the dynamic resource allocation and QoS control capabilities of [...] Read more.
Dynamic resource control capabilities have become increasingly important for academic networks that must support big scientific research projects at the same time as less data intensive research and educational activities. This paper describes the dynamic resource allocation and QoS control capabilities of the Japanese academic backbone network, called SINET3, which supports a variety of academic applications with a wide range of network services. The article describes the network architecture, networking technologies, resource allocation, QoS control, and layer-1 bandwidth on-demand services. It also details typical services developed for scientific research, including the user interface, resource control, and management functions, and includes performance evaluations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)
Open AccessArticle QoS Provisioning Techniques for Future Fiber-Wireless (FiWi) Access Networks
Future Internet 2010, 2(2), 126-155; doi:10.3390/fi2020126
Received: 23 February 2010 / Revised: 10 April 2010 / Accepted: 15 April 2010 / Published: 29 April 2010
Cited by 6 | PDF Full-text (785 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A plethora of enabling optical and wireless access-metro network technologies have been emerging that can be used to build future-proof bimodal fiber-wireless (FiWi) networks. Hybrid FiWi networks aim at providing wired and wireless quad-play services over the same infrastructure simultaneously and hold great promise to mitigate the digital divide and change the way we live and work by replacing commuting with teleworking. After overviewing enabling optical and wireless network technologies and their QoS provisioning techniques, we elaborate on enabling radio-over-fiber (RoF) and radio-and-fiber (R&F) technologies. We describe and investigate new QoS provisioning techniques for future FiWi networks, ranging from traffic class mapping, scheduling, and resource management to advanced aggregation techniques, congestion control, and layer-2 path selection algorithms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)
Open AccessArticle Dynamic QoS Evaluation of Multimedia Contents in Wireless Networks by “Double-Boomerang” Watermarking
Future Internet 2010, 2(1), 60-73; doi:10.3390/fi2010060
Received: 4 January 2010 / Revised: 2 February 2010 / Accepted: 2 March 2010 / Published: 8 March 2010
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work presents a cooperative network-aware processing of multimedia content for dynamic quality of service management in wireless IP networks. Our technique can be also used for quality control in UMTS environments, exploiting the tracing watermarking recently introduced in literature. In this [...] Read more.
This work presents a cooperative network-aware processing of multimedia content for dynamic quality of service management in wireless IP networks. Our technique can be also used for quality control in UMTS environments, exploiting the tracing watermarking recently introduced in literature. In this work, we use the transmitted video-sequences to monitor the QoS in a videoconference call. The video-sequence of every active user travels on the communication link, one time as video (transparent mode), one time as watermark (hidden mode) describing a boomerang trajectory. The results obtained through our simulation trials confirm the validity of such approach. In fact, the advantages of distributing the management process are (i) an easier and more precise localization of the cause of QoS problems, (ii) a better knowledge of local situations, (iii) a lower complexity for a single QoS agent and (iv) an increase in possible actions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)

Review

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Open AccessReview A Survey of QoS Multicast in Ad Hoc Networks
Future Internet 2010, 2(3), 388-416; doi:10.3390/fi2030388
Received: 27 July 2010 / Revised: 26 August 2010 / Accepted: 1 September 2010 / Published: 14 September 2010
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Abstract
This survey on Quality of Service (QoS) in multicast ad hoc networks uses a framework based on the mechanisms in three important elements: resource estimations, multicast tree/mesh administration, and multicast routing. Our contribution is an exploration of the design space and an [...] Read more.
This survey on Quality of Service (QoS) in multicast ad hoc networks uses a framework based on the mechanisms in three important elements: resource estimations, multicast tree/mesh administration, and multicast routing. Our contribution is an exploration of the design space and an identification of areas that have not been fully explored. We discuss the design space of central mechanisms and classify proposed QoS multicast schemes according to the mechanisms they used. In addition, we summarize the scenarios used for evaluating their performance. Furthermore, we identify issues, mechanisms, and scenarios that have not been fully investigated in existing works. The paper provides a coherent understanding of design principles, conceptual operation, and evaluated scenarios of schemes designed for QoS multicast application in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs). It also outlines new areas for future research in this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue QoS in Wired and Wireless IP Networks)

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