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Special Issue "Feature papers (2013)"

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A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Eric J. Jokela (Website)

School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida, 353 Newins-Ziegler Hall, PO Box 110410, Gainesville, FL 32611-0410, USA
Fax: +1 352 846 1277
Interests: tree nutrition; production ecology; nutrient cycling; forest soil carbon management; silvicultural management systems

Special Issue Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For this special issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for invited feature papers. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Tree Species Richness and Stand Productivity in Low-Density Cluster Plantings with Oaks (Quercus robur L. and Q. petraea (Mattuschka) Liebl.)
Forests 2013, 4(3), 650-665; doi:10.3390/f4030650
Received: 1 July 2013 / Revised: 8 August 2013 / Accepted: 9 August 2013 / Published: 16 August 2013
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1348 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Low density plantings complemented by natural regeneration is an increasingly common reforestation technique to ensure growth of a sufficient number of trees from desired species while maintaining natural processes such as succession. One such form of low density planting that aims at [...] Read more.
Low density plantings complemented by natural regeneration is an increasingly common reforestation technique to ensure growth of a sufficient number of trees from desired species while maintaining natural processes such as succession. One such form of low density planting that aims at lowering establishment costs—oak clusters—has been developed as an alternative to row planting since the 1980s in central Europe. However, whether cluster planting provides higher species richness and productivity than high density row planting has not previously been analyzed. Here, we compare tree species richness and productivity (measured as stand basal area) between oak cluster plantings and conventional row planting in young (10–26 years old) forest stands at seven study sites in Germany. Tree species richness was significantly higher in cluster plantings than in row plantings, whereas total basal areas were comparable. Naturally regenerated trees contributed on average to 43% of total stand basal area in cluster plantings, which was significantly higher than in row plantings. Total stand basal area in cluster planting was significantly related to the density of naturally regenerated trees. In turn, tree species diversity, density and basal area of naturally regenerated trees were increased with the size of unplanted area between clusters. Our results demonstrate that the admixture of naturally regenerated, early and mid-successional tree species compensates for a possible loss in productivity from planting fewer oaks. Low density cluster plantings can offer significant environmental benefits, at least for the first few decades of stand development, without compromising productivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature papers (2013))
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