Special Issue "Ultrasound Imaging in Medicine"

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A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Michael Bachmann Nielsen

Department of Radiology X2023, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark
Fax: +45 3545 2058
Interests: diagnostic radiology; cancer imaging; medical ultrasound; Doppler techniques; CT-scanning; medical presentations; musculoskeletal imaging

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultrasound examinations are performed within almost all medical specialties and are of paramount value in clinical medicine and as research tools. Diagnostic ultrasound as well as ultrasound guidance for biopsy, drainage and tumor ablation has become an integral part of the clinical setting. The last ten years have seen an increase in new ultrasound techniques like contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), elastography techniques, 3D ultrasound, image fusion with ultrasound and methods for flow visualization like vector Doppler. On the technical aspect also transducer technology has evolved tremendously. This special issue invites submission of both original and review papers, technical as well as clinical papers within all aspects of ultrasound imaging.

Prof. Dr. Michael Bachmann Nielsen
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Dear Colleagues,

Ultrasound examinations are performed within almost all medical specialties and are of paramount value in clinical medicine and as research tools. Diagnostic ultrasound as well as ultrasound guidance for biopsy, drainage and tumor ablation has become an integral part of the clinical setting. The last ten years have seen an increase in new ultrasound techniques like contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), elastography techniques, 3D ultrasound, image fusion with ultrasound and methods for flow visualization like vector Doppler. On the technical aspect also transducer technology has evolved tremendously. This special issue invites submission of both original and review papers, technical as well as clinical papers within all aspects of ultrasound imaging.

Prof. Dr. Michael Bachmann Nielsen

Guest Editor

Keywords

  • 3D ultrasound
  • blood flow velocity; ultrasonography
  • contrast enhanced ultrasound
  • elasticity imaging; ultrasonography
  • endoscopic ultrasound
  • ultrasonography
  • ultrasonography; interventional

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Endoscopic Color Doppler Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Gastric Varices Secondary to Left-Sided Portal Hypertension
Diagnostics 2014, 4(3), 94-103; doi:10.3390/diagnostics4030094
Received: 24 January 2014 / Revised: 27 May 2014 / Accepted: 19 June 2014 / Published: 26 June 2014
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Abstract
Gastric varices that arise secondary to the splenic vein occlusion can result in gastrointestinal hemorrhaging. Endoscopic color Doppler ultrasonography (ECDUS) was performed in 16 patients with gastric varices secondary to splenic vein occlusion. This study retrospectively evaluated the role of ECDUS in [...] Read more.
Gastric varices that arise secondary to the splenic vein occlusion can result in gastrointestinal hemorrhaging. Endoscopic color Doppler ultrasonography (ECDUS) was performed in 16 patients with gastric varices secondary to splenic vein occlusion. This study retrospectively evaluated the role of ECDUS in the diagnosis of gastric varices secondary to splenic vein occlusion. Thirteen patients had co-existing pancreatic diseases: 8 with chronic pancreatitis, 4 with cancer of the pancreatic body or tail and 1 with severe acute pancreatitis. Of the remaining 3 patients, 1 had myeloproliferative disease, 1 had advanced gastric cancer, and the third had splenic vein occlusion due to an obscure cause. The endoscopic findings of gastric varices were: variceal form (F) classified as enlarged tortuous (F2) in 12 cases and large, coil-shaped (F3) in 4 cases, and positive for erosion or red color sign of the variceal surface in 4 cases and negative in 12 cases. ECDUS color flow images of gastric variceal flow clearly depicted a round fundal region at the center, with varices expanding to the curvatura ventriculi major of the gastric body in all 16 cases. The velocities of F3 type gastric varices were significantly higher than those of the F2 type. The wall thickness of varices positive for erosion or red color sign was significantly less than the negative cases. I conclude that ECDUS color flow images of gastric variceal flow depicted specific findings of gastric varices secondary to splenic vein occlusion at the round fundal region at the center, with varices expanding to the curvatura ventriculi major of the gastric body. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging in Medicine)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Development of a Cancer Treatment with the Concomitant Use of Low-Intensity Ultrasound: Entering the Age of Simultaneous Diagnosis and Treatment
Diagnostics 2014, 4(2), 47-56; doi:10.3390/diagnostics4020047
Received: 10 January 2014 / Revised: 17 April 2014 / Accepted: 18 April 2014 / Published: 22 April 2014
PDF Full-text (231 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, studies using ultrasound energy for cancer treatment have advanced, thus revealing the enhancement of drug effects by employing low-intensity ultrasound. Furthermore, anti-angiogenesis against tumors is now attracting attention as a new cancer treatment. Therefore, we focused on the biological [...] Read more.
In recent years, studies using ultrasound energy for cancer treatment have advanced, thus revealing the enhancement of drug effects by employing low-intensity ultrasound. Furthermore, anti-angiogenesis against tumors is now attracting attention as a new cancer treatment. Therefore, we focused on the biological effects and the enhancement of drug effects brought by this low-intensity ultrasound energy and reported on the efficacy against a uterine sarcoma model, by implementing the basic studies, for the first time, including the concomitant use of low-intensity ultrasound irradiation, as an expected new antiangiogenic therapy for cancer treatment. Furthermore, we have succeeded in simultaneously utilizing low-intensity ultrasound in both diagnosis and treatment, upon real time evaluation of the anti-tumor effects and anti-angiogenesis effects using color Doppler ultrasound imaging. Although the biological effects of ultrasound have not yet been completely clarified, transient stomas were formed (Sonoporation) in cancer cells irradiated by low-intensity ultrasound and it is believed that the penetration effect of drugs is enhanced due to the drug being more charged inside the cell through these stomas. Furthermore, it has become clear that the concomitant therapy of anti-angiogenesis drugs and low-intensity ultrasound blocks the angiogenic factor VEGF produced by cancer cells, inhibits the induction of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in the bone marrow, and expedites angiogenic inhibitor TSP-1. Based on research achievements in recent years, we predict that the current diagnostic device for color Doppler ultrasound imaging will be improved in the near future, bringing with it the arrival of an age of “low-intensity ultrasound treatment that simultaneously enables diagnosis and treatment of cancer in real time.” Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ultrasound Imaging in Medicine)

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