Special Issue "Molecular Biomarkers for Cancer Targeted Therapeutics"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 November 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jianli Dong

Department of Pathology, Sealy Center for Cancer Cell Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, 5.202 John Sealy Annex, 301 University Boulevard Galveston, TX 77555, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: biomarkers in clinical application; molecular diagnostics; signaling pathway in cancer biology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in cancer genetics and molecular techniques are providing increased opportunities for molecular diagnostics in cancer. Cancer molecular tests typically analyze nucleic acid-based biomarkers and can be classified based on clinical application as diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive. Cancer diagnostic tests are used for cancer screening, diagnosis, subtyping, and staging; cancer prognostic tests reveal the nature course of cancer, disease outcome and recurrence following treatment; whereas cancer predictive tests provide information on the likely response of a patient to a drug or therapy. Often, a single molecular oncology test can find its application in more than one categories based on the clinical scenario. Molecular tests are expected to have ever-increasing impact on clinical management of cancer patients. For example, molecular diagnostics are developed to select patients who will benefit to a targeted therapeutics, to monitor the development of treatment resistance, to assess recurrence following treatment, to modify the dose of a therapeutic, and to identify the pharmacogenetic risk of adverse drug reactions. This way, correct treatment is determined per patient, non-effective treatments can be spared, and side-effects avoided, thus leading to personalized and precision cancer management.

Dr. Jianli Dong
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • cancer molecular diagnostics
  • diagnostic
  • prognostic
  • predictive
  • nucleic acid
  • companion molecular diagnostics
  • molecular targeted therapy

Published Papers (4 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-4
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle TD-GC-MS Investigation of the VOCs Released from Blood Plasma of Dogs with Cancer
Diagnostics 2013, 3(1), 68-83; doi:10.3390/diagnostics3010068
Received: 8 December 2012 / Revised: 31 December 2012 / Accepted: 15 January 2013 / Published: 16 January 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (474 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An analytical TD-GC-MS method was developed and used for the assessment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from the blood plasma of dogs with/without cancer. VOCs released from 40 samples of diseased blood and 10 control samples were compared in order to examine
[...] Read more.
An analytical TD-GC-MS method was developed and used for the assessment of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from the blood plasma of dogs with/without cancer. VOCs released from 40 samples of diseased blood and 10 control samples were compared in order to examine the difference between both sample groups that were showing qualitatively similar results independent from the disease’s presence. However, mild disturbances in the spectra of dogs with cancer in comparison with the control group were observed, and six peaks (tentatively identified by comparison with mass spectral library as hexanal, octanal, toluene, 2-butanone, 1-octen-3-ol and pyrrole) revealed statistically significant differences between both sample groups, thereby suggesting that these compounds are potential biomarkers that can be used for cancer diagnosis based on the blood plasma TD-GC-MS analysis. Statistical comparison with the application of principal component analysis (PCA) provided accurate discrimination between the cancer and control groups, thus demonstrating stronger biochemical perturbations in blood plasma when cancer is present. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomarkers for Cancer Targeted Therapeutics)
Open AccessArticle Soluble Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (sHER2) as a Potential Risk Assessment, Screening, and Diagnostic Biomarker of Lung Adenocarcinoma
Diagnostics 2013, 3(1), 13-32; doi:10.3390/diagnostics3010013
Received: 17 November 2012 / Revised: 17 December 2012 / Accepted: 4 January 2013 / Published: 14 January 2013
PDF Full-text (1028 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Here, we evaluated the potential clinical utility of soluble human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (sHER2) for the risk assessment, screening, and diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using
[...] Read more.
Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Here, we evaluated the potential clinical utility of soluble human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (sHER2) for the risk assessment, screening, and diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using an unmatched case-control study design. Serum sHER2 concentrations were measured by immunoassay in 244 primary NSCLC cases and 218 healthy controls. Wilcoxon rank-sum tests, logistic regression models, and receiver operating characteristic plots were used to assess whether sHER2 is associated with lung cancer. Median serum sHER2 concentrations are higher in patients with adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma regardless of gender, and sHER2 is a weak, independent biomarker of adenocarcinoma, but not of squamous cell carcinoma, adjusted for age and gender. The age-adjusted relative risk (odds) of adenocarcinoma is 3.95 (95% CI: 1.22, 12.81) and 7.93 (95% CI: 2.26, 27.82) greater for women and men with high sHER2 concentrations (≥6.60 ng/mL) vs. low sHER2 concentrations (≤1.85 ng/mL), respectively. When adjusted for each other, sHER2, age, and gender discern healthy controls from patients with primary adenocarcinomas of the lung with 85.9% accuracy. We conclude that even though serum sHER2 is not a strong, stand-alone discriminatory biomarker of adenocarcinoma, sHER2 may be a useful, independent covariate in multivariate risk assessment, screening, and diagnostic models of lung cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomarkers for Cancer Targeted Therapeutics)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Development of MicroRNA Therapeutics for Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Diagnostics 2013, 3(1), 170-191; doi:10.3390/diagnostics3010170
Received: 5 February 2013 / Revised: 1 March 2013 / Accepted: 11 March 2013 / Published: 15 March 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (213 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer and is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Treatment options for HCC are very limited, as it is often diagnosed at a late stage. Recent studies have demonstrated that microRNAs
[...] Read more.
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of liver cancer and is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Treatment options for HCC are very limited, as it is often diagnosed at a late stage. Recent studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs), a class of non-coding RNAs, are aberrantly expressed in HCC. Some of these were shown to be functionally involved in carcinogenesis and tumor progression, suggesting that miRNAs can serve as novel molecular targets for HCC therapy. Several promising studies have recently demonstrated the therapeutic potential of miRNAs in animal models and in reducing the viral load in hepatitis C patients. In this review, these advances and strategies for modulating miRNAs for in vivo therapeutic delivery and replacement therapy are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomarkers for Cancer Targeted Therapeutics)
Open AccessReview MicroRNAs as Biomarkers in Cancer
Diagnostics 2013, 3(1), 84-104; doi:10.3390/diagnostics3010084
Received: 15 November 2012 / Revised: 28 December 2012 / Accepted: 14 January 2013 / Published: 16 January 2013
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (715 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules, which in recent years have emerged to have enormous potential as biomarkers. Recently, there have been significant developments in understanding miRNA biogenesis, their regulatory mechanisms and role in disease process, and their potential as effective therapies.
[...] Read more.
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules, which in recent years have emerged to have enormous potential as biomarkers. Recently, there have been significant developments in understanding miRNA biogenesis, their regulatory mechanisms and role in disease process, and their potential as effective therapies. The identification of miRNAs as biomarkers provides possibilities for development of less or non-invasive and more specific methods for monitoring tumor growth and progression. This review summarizes the recent developments in methods to detect and quantitate miRNAs in body fluids and their applications as biomarkers in cancers. The prospect of miRNAs as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers with clinical applications is significant as more evidence points to their central role in cancer pathobiology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Molecular Biomarkers for Cancer Targeted Therapeutics)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Diagnostics Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
diagnostics@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Diagnostics
Back to Top