Special Issue "Crystalline Hydrogen Storage Materials"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Duncan H. Gregory

School of Chemistry, University of Glasgow, University Avenue, Glasgow, G12 8QQ, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nitrides; chalcogenides; carbides; hydrides; synthesis; structure; solid state chemistry; materials chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Meeting the rising energy demands of both developed and developing nations is essential. The need for energy and the steady depletion of fossil fuels present serious challenges to sustainable development. Equally, if the adverse effects of global warming are to be averted, the adoption of clean, renewable energy sources is imperative. Hydrogen has the potential to replace fossil fuels as a clean, high energy density alternative, but key technical issues need to be resolved before such a transition can occur. It is widely accepted that safe, compact storage of hydrogen in a solid medium would be extremely attractive, particularly for mobile applications, yet solid state storage is arguably the most demanding and challenging aspect of a hydrogen economy.

The turn of the millennium has seen a huge growth in the quest for new hydrogen storage materials that meet the stringent criteria required for a “like-for-like” replacement of the gasoline tank in vehicles. Possible solutions range from porous solids in which hydrogen is weakly adsorbed at relatively low temperature, through metal and alloys to complex and chemical hydrides, which have high gravimetric and volumetric capacities but require higher temperatures for reversible hydrogen storage. By far the vast majority of hydrogen storage materials are crystalline solids; an understanding of both crystal structure and microstructure has proved invaluable in interpreting the chemical and physical functionalities of these solids.

Chemists, physicists, and materials scientists are required to understand the links between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics in order to apply design concepts toward creating new and improved storage materials. This Special Issue invites contributions in all areas of Crystalline Hydrogen Storage Materials. The issue will primarily consider how  understanding structure, at all length scales, leads to improved explanations of mechanism and reactivity, and in turn, ultimately, to materials with enhanced storage performance.

Prof. Duncan H. Gregory
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrogen storage
  • structure
  • X-ray diffraction
  • neutron diffraction
  • electron microscopy
  • scattering
  • NMR
  • spectroscopy
  • hydrides
  • carbon
  • MOFs

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle The Search for Hydrogen Stores on a Large Scale; A Straightforward and Automated Open Database Analysis as a First Sweep for Candidate Materials
Crystals 2015, 5(4), 617-633; doi:10.3390/cryst5040617
Received: 5 November 2015 / Revised: 17 November 2015 / Accepted: 18 November 2015 / Published: 25 November 2015
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1702 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The storage of hydrogen is considered as the bottleneck in the implementation of portable fuel cell power generating systems. The necessary experimental studies to discover and develop appropriate storage materials are always time-limited. We discuss herein the approach of an uncomplicated and accessible
[...] Read more.
The storage of hydrogen is considered as the bottleneck in the implementation of portable fuel cell power generating systems. The necessary experimental studies to discover and develop appropriate storage materials are always time-limited. We discuss herein the approach of an uncomplicated and accessible computationally based analysis of database knowledge towards the identification of promising storage systems. The open access policy of the Crystallography Open Database (COD) invites researchers to grasp the opportunity to formulate targeted analyses of crystalline solids, unfettered by material resources. We apply such an approach to the initial evaluation of potential solid-state hydrogen stores, although the method could potentially be transferred to other material analysis tasks. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crystalline Hydrogen Storage Materials)

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