Special Issue "Ocean's Role in Continental and Coastal Climate Variability and Change"

A special issue of Climate (ISSN 2225-1154).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Hyo Choi

Department of Atmospheric & Environmental Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Gangneung-Wonju National University, Gangneung campus, Jukheongil 7, Gangneung, Gangwondo 25457, South Korea
Atmospheric and Oceanic Disaster Research Institute, Dalim Apt. 209 ho, Songjungdong 940-23, Gangneung, Gangwondo 25563, South Korea
Website | E-Mail
Interests: numerical modeling of air pollution; coastal and oceanic atmospheric boundary layer; physical oceanography (waves and typhoon)
Guest Editor
Dr. Milton S. Speer

Climate Change Research Centre, The University of South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: severe weather and air quality modeling; meso-scale and synoptic-scale meteorology; extra-tropical climate; climate variability and change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ocean exchanges heat by absorbing solar radiation and releasing it into the atmosphere, moisture through evaporation and condensation of water vapor, and carbon dioxide through air–sea interactions with the atmosphere, causing a significant influence on continental and coastal climates, for both short-term and long-term periods.

This Special Issue will be focused on both short-term and long-term climate changes, involving heat transport and ocean circulation impacts on continental and coastal climates, variability of temperature ranges in continental, coastal, and ocean processes on intra- and inter-annual time scales, sea level rise and coastal erosion, biological pumps in the ocean impacting carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere, severe flood and draught, El Nino, the unusual paths of tropical cyclones, as well as their development and decay in coastal and open seas. However, there are also no limitations in regards to processes applied in the above-mentioned subject areas.

Prof. Dr. Hyo Choi
Dr. Milton S. Speer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Climate is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • short-term and long-term climate changes involving heat transport and ocean circulation impact on continental and coastal climates
  • variability of temperature ranges intra- and inter-annual time scales in continent, coast and ocean
  • sea level rise and coastal erosion
  • carbon dioxide transferring through the air-sea interface
  • biological pump in the ocean impacting carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere
  • severe flood and draught
  • unusual paths of tropical cyclone and their development and decay
  • El Nino

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Dominant Modes of Upper Ocean Heat Content in the North Indian Ocean
Climate 2018, 6(3), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli6030071
Received: 3 August 2018 / Revised: 24 August 2018 / Accepted: 28 August 2018 / Published: 3 September 2018
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Abstract
The thermal energy needed for the development of hurricanes and monsoons as well as any prolonged marine weather event comes from layers in the upper oceans, not just from the thin layer represented by sea surface temperature alone. Ocean layers have different modes
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The thermal energy needed for the development of hurricanes and monsoons as well as any prolonged marine weather event comes from layers in the upper oceans, not just from the thin layer represented by sea surface temperature alone. Ocean layers have different modes of thermal energy variability because of the different time scales of ocean–atmosphere interaction. Although many previous studies have focused on the influence of upper ocean heat content (OHC) on tropical cyclones and monsoons, no study thus far—particularly in the North Indian Ocean (NIO)—has specifically concluded the types of dominant modes in different layers of the ocean. In this study, we examined the dominant modes of variability of OHC of seven layers in the NIO during 1998–2014. We conclude that the thermal variability in the top 50 m of the ocean had statistically significant semiannual and annual modes of variability, while the deeper layers had the annual mode alone. Time series of OHC for the top four layers were analyzed separately for the NIO, Arabian Sea, and Bay of Bengal. For the surface to 50 m layer, the lowest and the highest values of OHC were present in January and May every year, respectively, which was mainly caused by the solar radiation cycle. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Sensitivity of the Madden Julian Oscillation to Ocean Warming in a Lagrangian Atmospheric Model
Climate 2018, 6(2), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/cli6020045
Received: 12 April 2018 / Revised: 12 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 28 May 2018
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Abstract
The Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the largest contributor to intraseasonal weather variations in the tropics. It is associated with a broad region of enhanced rainfall that moves slowly eastward over the Indian and western Pacific Oceans, which has global impacts on atmospheric
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The Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the largest contributor to intraseasonal weather variations in the tropics. It is associated with a broad region of enhanced rainfall that moves slowly eastward over the Indian and western Pacific Oceans, which has global impacts on atmospheric circulations. A number of recent observational and modeling studies have suggested that the MJO is becoming stronger as the oceans warm. In this study, the author explores the sensitivity of the MJO to ocean warming in a recently developed Lagrangian Atmospheric Model (LAM), which has been shown to simulate robust and realistic MJOs in previous work. Numerical simulations suggest that ocean warming leads to more frequent and intense MJOs that propagate more rapidly and cover a larger region of the tropics. The strengthening of the MJO is attributed to enhanced surface fluxes of moisture coming from the warmer ocean waters. While the LAM simulations have a number of limitations owing to idealized physical parameterizations and the use of prescribed sea surface temperatures, they provide additional evidence that the MJO will strengthen if the oceans continue to warm, and they also shed light on the mechanism of this strengthening. Full article
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