Special Issue "Multiplex and Multiparametric Sensing Devices"

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A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2012)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Christophe A. Marquette (Website1, Website2)

Institut de Chimie et Biochimie Moléculaires et Supramoléculaires Equipe Génie Enzymatique, Membranes Biomimétiques et Assemblages Supramoléculaires (GEMBAS) Université Lyon 1 - CNRS 5246 ICBMS Bâtiment CPE 43, bd du 11 novembre 1918 69622 Villeurbanne, Cedex, France.
Interests: biochip; 3D bioprinting; diagnostic; electrochemistry; microarray; optical devices surface chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multiplex and multiparametric sensing devices are the new generation of bio-analytical tool, particularly in the field of health-care, diagnosis and security. Achievement of new multiplexing concepts, advancement of controlled surface chemistries and detection technologies, as well as the identification of newly discovered biomarkers have led the advancement of devices capable of detecting multiple targets at once.
This special issue invites contributions particularly relating to application-oriented multiplex and multiparametric sensing devices using innovative development techniques. Examples of application areas include, but are not limited to, cancer markers multi-detection, multiplex genotyping, beads based assays, multiplexed immunoassays and cell analysis multiplex systems.

Dr. Christophe A. Marquette
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • multiplex assays
  • multiparameter assays
  • parallelized chips sensors
  • protein arrays
  • multiple biomarkers detection
  • SNP genotyping

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Evaluation of Impedance-Based Label-Free Technology as a Tool for Pharmacology and Toxicology Investigations
Biosensors 2013, 3(1), 132-156; doi:10.3390/bios3010132
Received: 1 January 2013 / Revised: 15 February 2013 / Accepted: 27 February 2013 / Published: 15 March 2013
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (987 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The use of label-free technologies based on electrical impedance is becoming more and more popular in drug discovery. Indeed, such a methodology allows the continuous monitoring of diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, migration, cytotoxicity and receptor-mediated signaling. The objective of the present [...] Read more.
The use of label-free technologies based on electrical impedance is becoming more and more popular in drug discovery. Indeed, such a methodology allows the continuous monitoring of diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, migration, cytotoxicity and receptor-mediated signaling. The objective of the present study was to further assess the usefulness of the real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) and, in particular, the xCELLigence platform, in the context of early drug development for pharmacology and toxicology investigations. In the present manuscript, four cellular models were exposed to 50 compounds to compare the cell index generated by RTCA and cell viability measured with a traditional viability assay. The data revealed an acceptable correlation (ca. 80%) for both cell lines (i.e., HepG2 and HepaRG), but a lack of correlation (ca. 55%) for the primary human and rat hepatocytes. In addition, specific RTCA profiles (signatures) were generated when HepG2 and HepaRG cells were exposed to calcium modulators, antimitotics, DNA damaging and nuclear receptor agents, with a percentage of prediction close to 80% for both cellular models. In a subsequent experiment, HepG2 cells were exposed to 81 proprietary UCB compounds known to be genotoxic or not. Based on the DNA damaging signatures, the RTCA technology allowed the detection of ca. 50% of the genotoxic compounds (n = 29) and nearly 100% of the non-genotoxic compounds (n = 52). Overall, despite some limitations, the xCELLigence platform is a powerful and reliable tool that can be used in drug discovery for toxicity and pharmacology studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiplex and Multiparametric Sensing Devices)

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview The Use of Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme I/D Genetic Polymorphism as a Biomarker of Athletic Performance in Humans
Biosensors 2012, 2(4), 396-404; doi:10.3390/bios2040396
Received: 17 August 2012 / Revised: 17 September 2012 / Accepted: 24 September 2012 / Published: 9 October 2012
PDF Full-text (137 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Angiotensin II is a key regulator of blood pressure and cardiovascular function in mammals. The conversion of angiotensin into its active form is carried out by Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE). The measurement of ACE concentration in plasma or serum, its enzymatic activity, [...] Read more.
Angiotensin II is a key regulator of blood pressure and cardiovascular function in mammals. The conversion of angiotensin into its active form is carried out by Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE). The measurement of ACE concentration in plasma or serum, its enzymatic activity, and the correlation between an insertion/deletion (I/D) genetic polymorphism of the ACE gene have been investigated as possible indicators of superior athletic performance in humans. In this context, other indicators of superior adaptation to exercise resulting in better athletic performance (such as ventricular hypertrophy, VO2 max, and competition results) were mostly used to study the association between ACE I/D polymorphism and improved performance. Despite the fact that the existing literature presents little consensus, there is sufficient scientific evidence to warrant further investigation on the usage of ACE activity and the I/D ACE gene polymorphism as biomarkers of superior athletic performance in humans of specific ethnicities or in athletes involved in certain sports. In this sense, a biomarker would be a substance or genetic component that could be measured to provide a degree of certainty, or an indication, of the presence of a certain trait or characteristic that would be beneficial to the athlete’s performance. Difficulties in interpreting and comparing the results of scientific research on the topic arise from dissimilar protocols and variation in study design. This review aims to investigate the current literature on the use of ACE I/D polymorphism as a biomarker of performance in humans through the comparison of scientific publications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Multiplex and Multiparametric Sensing Devices)

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