E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Ozone Depletion and Climate Change"

Quicklinks

A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marc von Hobe

Institute for Stratospheric Research (ICG-I), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, IEK-7, Wilhelm-Johnen-Straße, D-52425 Jülich, Germany
E-Mail
Phone: +49 2461 61 4620
Fax: +49 2461 61 5346
Interests: earth observations and their use for process understanding; polar strospheric ozone depletion; stratospheric halogens; interactions between the sulphur cycle and the stratospheric aerosol layer;

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Two global environmental issues, the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer and climate change, have been in the focus of atmospheric research over the past three decades. With respect to their mainly anthropogenic causes, they are two largely independent phenomena. However, given that ozone itself is a greenhouse gas, ozone depletion plays an important role in the global climate system, and vice versa climate change strongly affects the global ozone layer.  The effects of climate change on stratospheric processes can be direct (by cooling the stratosphere) or indirect (by influencing stratospheric dynamics and composition).  Furthermore, ozone is responsible for warming the stratosphere, and hence ozone depletion can alter stratospheric temperature profiles and indirectly atmospheric dynamics on a global scale.

The special issue will cover the coupling of stratospheric ozone and climate change in a broad sense. We look for and invite contributions on a variety of research activities and scales: laboratory experiments, field observations and theoretical studies that examine specific physical and chemical processes, large scale observations on past and ongoing changes, and modeling studies from regional to global scales that investigate past, present and future interactions between ozone depletion and climate change.

Dr. Marc von Hobe
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • ozone depletion
  • climate change
  • stratospheric dynamics
  • stratospheric chemistry
  • laboratory experiments
  • field observations
  • process modeling
  • chemistry climate models
  • geoengineering

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle Atmospheric Abundances, Trends and Emissions of CFC-216ba, CFC-216ca and HCFC-225ca
Atmosphere 2014, 5(2), 420-434; doi:10.3390/atmos5020420
Received: 28 February 2014 / Revised: 16 May 2014 / Accepted: 27 May 2014 / Published: 4 June 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (376 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The first observations of the feedstocks, CFC-216ba (1,2-dichlorohexafluoropropane) and CFC-216ca (1,3-dichlorohexafluoropropane), as well as the CFC substitute HCFC-225ca (3,3-dichloro-1,1,1,2,2-pentafluoropropane), are reported in air samples collected between 1978 and 2012 at Cape Grim, Tasmania. Present day (2012) mixing ratios are 37.8 ± 0.08 ppq (parts
[...] Read more.
The first observations of the feedstocks, CFC-216ba (1,2-dichlorohexafluoropropane) and CFC-216ca (1,3-dichlorohexafluoropropane), as well as the CFC substitute HCFC-225ca (3,3-dichloro-1,1,1,2,2-pentafluoropropane), are reported in air samples collected between 1978 and 2012 at Cape Grim, Tasmania. Present day (2012) mixing ratios are 37.8 ± 0.08 ppq (parts per quadrillion; 1015) and 20.2 ± 0.3 ppq for CFC-216ba and CFC-216ca, respectively. The abundance of CFC-216ba has been approximately constant for the past 20 years, whilst that of CFC-216ca is increasing, at a current rate of 0.2 ppq/year. Upper tropospheric air samples collected in 2013 suggest a further continuation of this trend. Inferred annual emissions peaked 421 at 0.18 Gg/year (CFC-216ba) and 0.05 Gg/year (CFC-216ca) in the mid-1980s and then decreased sharply as expected from the Montreal Protocol phase-out schedule for CFCs. The atmospheric trend of CFC-216ca and CFC-216ba translates into continuing emissions of around 0.01 Gg/year in 2011, indicating that significant banks still exist or that they are still being used. HCFC-225ca was not detected in air samples collected before 1992. The highest mixing ratio of 52 ± 1 ppq was observed in 2001. Increasing annual emissions were found in the 1990s (i.e., when HCFC-225ca was being introduced as a replacement for CFCs). Emissions peaked around 1999 at about 1.51 Gg/year. In accordance with the Montreal Protocol, restrictions on HCFC consumption and the short lifetime of HCFC-225ca, mixing ratios declined after 2001 to 23.3 ± 0.7 ppq by 2012. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ozone Depletion and Climate Change)
Figures

Open AccessArticle Comparative Spectral Analysis and Correlation Properties of Observed and Simulated Total Column Ozone Records
Atmosphere 2013, 4(2), 198-213; doi:10.3390/atmos4020198
Received: 24 April 2013 / Revised: 9 May 2013 / Accepted: 11 May 2013 / Published: 14 June 2013
PDF Full-text (13841 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We present a statistical analysis of total column ozone records obtained from satellite measurements and from two global climate chemistry models on global scale. Firstly, a spectral weight analysis is performed where the relative strength of semiannual, annual and quasi-biennial oscillations are determined
[...] Read more.
We present a statistical analysis of total column ozone records obtained from satellite measurements and from two global climate chemistry models on global scale. Firstly, a spectral weight analysis is performed where the relative strength of semiannual, annual and quasi-biennial oscillations are determined with respect to the integrated power spectra. The comparison reveals some anomalies in the model representations at each spectral component. The tails of the spectra demonstrate that both models underestimate high frequency (daily) ozone variability, which might have a complex origin, since several dynamical processes affect short time changes of the ozone level at a given location. Secondly, detrended fluctuation analysis is exploited to analyze two-point correlations of anomaly time series. Both models reproduce the characteristic geographic dependence of correlation strength over the overlapping area with empirical observations (latitude band between 60°S and 60°N). The values of precise correlation exponents are hard to obtain over regions where quasi-biennial oscillations or other strong nonstationarities (ozone hole) are present. In spite of all the numerical difficulties, significant long range correlations are detected for total ozone over all geographic locations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ozone Depletion and Climate Change)
Figures

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview Numerical Modeling of Climate-Chemistry Connections: Recent Developments and Future Challenges
Atmosphere 2013, 4(2), 132-156; doi:10.3390/atmos4020132
Received: 26 March 2013 / Revised: 3 May 2013 / Accepted: 8 May 2013 / Published: 17 May 2013
PDF Full-text (1015 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This paper reviews the current state and development of different numerical model classes that are used to simulate the global atmospheric system, particularly Earth’s climate and climate-chemistry connections. The focus is on Chemistry-Climate Models. In general, these serve to examine dynamical and chemical
[...] Read more.
This paper reviews the current state and development of different numerical model classes that are used to simulate the global atmospheric system, particularly Earth’s climate and climate-chemistry connections. The focus is on Chemistry-Climate Models. In general, these serve to examine dynamical and chemical processes in the Earth atmosphere, their feedback, and interaction with climate. Such models have been established as helpful tools in addition to analyses of observational data. Definitions of the global model classes are given and their capabilities as well as weaknesses are discussed. Examples of scientific studies indicate how numerical exercises contribute to an improved understanding of atmospheric behavior. There, the focus is on synergistic investigations combining observations and model results. The possible future developments and challenges are presented, not only from the scientific point of view but also regarding the computer technology and respective consequences for numerical modeling of atmospheric processes. In the future, a stronger cross-linkage of subject-specific scientists is necessary, to tackle the looming challenges. It should link the specialist discipline and applied computer science. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Ozone Depletion and Climate Change)

Journal Contact

MDPI AG
Atmosphere Editorial Office
St. Alban-Anlage 66, 4052 Basel, Switzerland
atmosphere@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
Contact Details Submit to Atmosphere
Back to Top