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Horticulturae 2017, 3(2), 34; doi:10.3390/horticulturae3020034

Horticultural Loss Generated by Wholesalers: A Case Study of the Canning Vale Fruit and Vegetable Markets in Western Australia

1
Murdoch Applied Nanotechnology Research Group, Department of Physics, Energy Studies and Nanotechnology, School of Engineering and Energy, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
2
Mathematics and Statistics, School of Engineering and Energy, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia
3
Department of Agriculture and Food, 3 Baron Hay Court, South Perth, Western Australia 6151, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Douglas D. Archbold
Received: 6 April 2017 / Revised: 9 May 2017 / Accepted: 20 May 2017 / Published: 25 May 2017
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1633 KB, uploaded 25 May 2017]   |  

Abstract

In today’s economic climate, businesses need to efficiently manage their finite resources to maintain long-term sustainable growth, productivity, and profits. However, food loss produces large unacceptable economic losses, environmental degradation, and impacts on humanity globally. Its cost in Australia is estimated to be around AUS$8 billion each year, but knowledge of its extent within the food value chain from farm to fork is very limited. The present study examines food loss by wholesalers. A survey questionnaire was prepared and distributed; 35 wholesalers and processors replied and their responses to 10 targeted questions on produce volumes, amounts handled, reasons for food loss, and innovations applied or being considered to reduce and utilize food loss were analyzed. Reported food loss was estimated to be 180 kg per week per primary wholesaler and 30 kg per secondary wholesaler, or around 286 tonnes per year. Participants ranked “over supply” and “no market demand” as the main causes for food loss. The study found that improving grading guidelines has the potential to significantly reduce food loss levels and improve profit margins. View Full-Text
Keywords: food loss; sustainability; food supply chain; food security; loss management; productivity food loss; sustainability; food supply chain; food security; loss management; productivity
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Ghosh, P.R.; Fawcett, D.; Perera, D.; Sharma, S.B.; Poinern, G.E.J. Horticultural Loss Generated by Wholesalers: A Case Study of the Canning Vale Fruit and Vegetable Markets in Western Australia. Horticulturae 2017, 3, 34.

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