Special Issue "Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marco A. Palma

Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, 600 John Kimbrough Blvd., Suite 330D, 2124 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 979 845 5284
Fax: +1 979 845 7444
Interests: consumer economics; marketing; experimental economics; neuroeconomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Horticulturae is launching a Special Issue on marketing and economics. We encourage the submission of high-quality papers related to all aspects of horticulture economics, marketing and management including horticulture production of fruits, vegetables and green industry products; adoption of new technologies and production practices; processing, distribution and transportation; marketing and consumer preferences; international trade; policy analysis; food safety; and the role of horticulture in food security, nutrition and health.

Dr. Marco A. Palma
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • horticulture marketing and economics
  • value added horticulture
  • consumer preferences
  • international trade
  • food security
  • food safety

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Implications of Smallholder Farm Production Diversity for Household Food Consumption Diversity: Insights from Diverse Agro-Ecological and Market Access Contexts in Rural Tanzania
Horticulturae 2018, 4(3), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae4030014
Received: 9 May 2018 / Revised: 30 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 8 July 2018
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Abstract
Owing to persistent challenges of food and nutritional insecurity, recent literature has focused on the role diversity of farm production has on food consumption diversity, particularly for smallholder households. Yet, the relationship between farm production diversity and household food consumption diversity remains complex
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Owing to persistent challenges of food and nutritional insecurity, recent literature has focused on the role diversity of farm production has on food consumption diversity, particularly for smallholder households. Yet, the relationship between farm production diversity and household food consumption diversity remains complex and empirical evidence is, so far, mixed. The present article assesses this relationship using two districts—Kilosa and Chamwino—with contrasting agro-ecological and market contexts in rural Tanzania. These districts represent the majority of farming systems found in Tanzania as well as in several countries within the region. We used household data and employed descriptive as well as multivariate regression analyses. The results indicated a positive role of farm production diversity for food consumption diversity in the district with relatively harsh climatic and agro-ecological characteristics and poor access to markets. Furthermore, increased farm production diversity was generally associated with seasonal food consumption diversity. However, results suggested a lesser role of farm production diversity in the presence of better agro-ecological and market access characteristics. These findings imply that promoting farm production diversity should consider the existing agro-ecological and market characteristics. In addition, achieving increased food consumption diversity among rural households may require effective market related infrastructure and institutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
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Open AccessArticle Assessing Purchase Patterns of Price Conscious Consumers
Horticulturae 2018, 4(3), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae4030013
Received: 19 May 2018 / Revised: 14 June 2018 / Accepted: 21 June 2018 / Published: 2 July 2018
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Abstract
Price greatly influences consumers’ purchasing decisions. Individuals whose decisions are primarily driven by price are said to be ‘price conscious’. To date, studies have focused on defining price consciousness and identifying factors that contribute to price-conscious behavior. However, research using visual attention to
[...] Read more.
Price greatly influences consumers’ purchasing decisions. Individuals whose decisions are primarily driven by price are said to be ‘price conscious’. To date, studies have focused on defining price consciousness and identifying factors that contribute to price-conscious behavior. However, research using visual attention to assess how price conscious consumers use in-store stimuli is limited. Here, consumers’ purchasing decisions are assessed using a rating-based conjoint analysis paired with eye tracking technology when shopping for ornamental plants. An ordered logit model is employed to understand price conscious consumers’ purchase patterns and choice outcomes. Overall, price conscious consumers are less attentive to price information. Being price conscious tends to reduce purchase likelihood, ceteris paribus. Increasing visual attention to price decreases consumers’ purchase likelihood, which is amplified for price conscious consumers. Price conscious consumers tend to be quicker decision makers than non-price conscious consumers. Results are beneficial to retailers interested in targeting or primarily catering to price conscious consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Quantifying Postharvest Loss and the Implication of Market-Based Decisions: A Case Study of Two Commercial Domestic Tomato Supply Chains in Queensland, Australia
Horticulturae 2017, 3(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae3030044
Received: 8 July 2017 / Revised: 23 July 2017 / Accepted: 1 August 2017 / Published: 5 August 2017
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Abstract
Abstract: Using a multi-disciplinary approach, this study quantifies horticultural postharvest losses of two medium-sized (annual pack volume 4500 t) commercial, domestic, tomato supply chains. Quantification of loss was based on weight or volume, consistent with direct measurement methods of the Food Loss and
[...] Read more.
Abstract: Using a multi-disciplinary approach, this study quantifies horticultural postharvest losses of two medium-sized (annual pack volume 4500 t) commercial, domestic, tomato supply chains. Quantification of loss was based on weight or volume, consistent with direct measurement methods of the Food Loss and Waste Accounting and Reporting Standard 2016 and qualitative techniques were used to identify the drivers of the loss and contextualise the findings. Postharvest loss was found to be between 40.3% (55.34 t) and 55.9% (29.61 t) of the total harvestable product. It was determined that between 68.6% and 86.7% of undamaged, edible, harvested tomatoes were rejected as outgrades and consequently discarded due to product specifications. Between 71.2% and 84.1% of produced tomatoes were left in the field and not harvested. This study highlights significant factors contributing to high levels of food loss and waste. Edible products are being removed from the commercial food supply chain, rejected as outgrades deemed cosmetically defective due to market-based decisions. With only 44.1% and 59.7% of the harvestable crop reaching the consumers of the two supply chains, respectively, it is perhaps more appropriate to describe a food “waste” chain as opposed to a food “supply” chain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Horticultural Loss Generated by Wholesalers: A Case Study of the Canning Vale Fruit and Vegetable Markets in Western Australia
Horticulturae 2017, 3(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae3020034
Received: 6 April 2017 / Revised: 9 May 2017 / Accepted: 20 May 2017 / Published: 25 May 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1633 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In today’s economic climate, businesses need to efficiently manage their finite resources to maintain long-term sustainable growth, productivity, and profits. However, food loss produces large unacceptable economic losses, environmental degradation, and impacts on humanity globally. Its cost in Australia is estimated to be
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In today’s economic climate, businesses need to efficiently manage their finite resources to maintain long-term sustainable growth, productivity, and profits. However, food loss produces large unacceptable economic losses, environmental degradation, and impacts on humanity globally. Its cost in Australia is estimated to be around AUS$8 billion each year, but knowledge of its extent within the food value chain from farm to fork is very limited. The present study examines food loss by wholesalers. A survey questionnaire was prepared and distributed; 35 wholesalers and processors replied and their responses to 10 targeted questions on produce volumes, amounts handled, reasons for food loss, and innovations applied or being considered to reduce and utilize food loss were analyzed. Reported food loss was estimated to be 180 kg per week per primary wholesaler and 30 kg per secondary wholesaler, or around 286 tonnes per year. Participants ranked “over supply” and “no market demand” as the main causes for food loss. The study found that improving grading guidelines has the potential to significantly reduce food loss levels and improve profit margins. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
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Open AccessArticle Economic Cost-Analysis of the Impact of Container Size on Transplanted Tree Value
Horticulturae 2017, 3(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae3020029
Received: 26 October 2016 / Revised: 18 April 2017 / Accepted: 21 April 2017 / Published: 27 April 2017
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Abstract
The benefits and costs of varying container sizes have yet to be fully evaluated to determine which container size affords the most advantageous opportunity for consumers. To determine value of the tree following transplant, clonal replicates of Vitex agnus-castus L. [Chaste Tree], Acer
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The benefits and costs of varying container sizes have yet to be fully evaluated to determine which container size affords the most advantageous opportunity for consumers. To determine value of the tree following transplant, clonal replicates of Vitex agnus-castus L. [Chaste Tree], Acer rubrum L. var. drummondii (Hook. & Arn. ex Nutt.) Sarg. [Drummond Red Maple], and Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich. [Baldcypress] were grown under common conditions in each of five container sizes 3.5, 11.7, 23.3, 97.8 or 175.0 L, respectively (#1, 3, 7, 25 or 45). In June 2013, six trees of each container size and species were transplanted to a sandy clay loam field in College Station, Texas. To determine the increase in value over a two-year post-transplant period, height and caliper measurements were taken at the end of nursery production and again at the end of the second growing season in the field, October 2014. Utilizing industry standards, initial costs of materials and labor were then compared with the size of trees after two years. Replacement cost analysis after two growing seasons indicated a greater increase in value for 11.7 and 23.3 L trees compared to losses in value for some 175.0 L trees. In comparison with trees from larger containers, trees from smaller size containers experienced shorter establishment times and increased growth rates, thus creating a quicker return on investment for trees transplanted from the smaller container sizes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Relationship Marketing: A Qualitative Case Study of New-Media Marketing Use by Kansas Garden Centers
Horticulturae 2017, 3(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae3010026
Received: 22 December 2016 / Revised: 21 February 2017 / Accepted: 8 March 2017 / Published: 11 March 2017
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Abstract
A primary factor limiting the expansion of many Kansas garden centers is marketing. Most of these businesses spend the majority of advertising dollars on traditional media (newspaper, radio, etc.). However, new-media tools such as social-media can be an effective method for developing profitable
[...] Read more.
A primary factor limiting the expansion of many Kansas garden centers is marketing. Most of these businesses spend the majority of advertising dollars on traditional media (newspaper, radio, etc.). However, new-media tools such as social-media can be an effective method for developing profitable relationships with customers. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of garden center stakeholders as they use new-media to market their businesses. Grunig’s Excellency Theory served as the theoretical framework for this study. Results indicate garden center operators prefer to use traditional media channels to market to their customers and asynchronously communicate with their target audiences. Stakeholders often have inaccurate or conflicting views of traditional media and new-media in regard to advertising and tend to approach new-media marketing from a public information or asynchronous viewpoint. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
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