Special Issue "Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marco A. Palma

Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University, 600 John Kimbrough Blvd., Suite 330D, 2124 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 979 845 5284
Fax: +1 979 845 7444
Interests: consumer economics; marketing; experimental economics; neuroeconomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Horticulturae is launching a Special Issue on marketing and economics. We encourage the submission of high-quality papers related to all aspects of horticulture economics, marketing and management including horticulture production of fruits, vegetables and green industry products; adoption of new technologies and production practices; processing, distribution and transportation; marketing and consumer preferences; international trade; policy analysis; food safety; and the role of horticulture in food security, nutrition and health.

Dr. Marco A. Palma
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • horticulture marketing and economics
  • value added horticulture
  • consumer preferences
  • international trade
  • food security
  • food safety

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Economic Cost-Analysis of the Impact of Container Size on Transplanted Tree Value
Horticulturae 2017, 3(2), 29; doi:10.3390/horticulturae3020029
Received: 26 October 2016 / Revised: 18 April 2017 / Accepted: 21 April 2017 / Published: 27 April 2017
PDF Full-text (1943 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The benefits and costs of varying container sizes have yet to be fully evaluated to determine which container size affords the most advantageous opportunity for consumers. To determine value of the tree following transplant, clonal replicates of Vitex agnus-castus L. [Chaste Tree], Acer
[...] Read more.
The benefits and costs of varying container sizes have yet to be fully evaluated to determine which container size affords the most advantageous opportunity for consumers. To determine value of the tree following transplant, clonal replicates of Vitex agnus-castus L. [Chaste Tree], Acer rubrum L. var. drummondii (Hook. & Arn. ex Nutt.) Sarg. [Drummond Red Maple], and Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich. [Baldcypress] were grown under common conditions in each of five container sizes 3.5, 11.7, 23.3, 97.8 or 175.0 L, respectively (#1, 3, 7, 25 or 45). In June 2013, six trees of each container size and species were transplanted to a sandy clay loam field in College Station, Texas. To determine the increase in value over a two-year post-transplant period, height and caliper measurements were taken at the end of nursery production and again at the end of the second growing season in the field, October 2014. Utilizing industry standards, initial costs of materials and labor were then compared with the size of trees after two years. Replacement cost analysis after two growing seasons indicated a greater increase in value for 11.7 and 23.3 L trees compared to losses in value for some 175.0 L trees. In comparison with trees from larger containers, trees from smaller size containers experienced shorter establishment times and increased growth rates, thus creating a quicker return on investment for trees transplanted from the smaller container sizes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Relationship Marketing: A Qualitative Case Study of New-Media Marketing Use by Kansas Garden Centers
Horticulturae 2017, 3(1), 26; doi:10.3390/horticulturae3010026
Received: 22 December 2016 / Revised: 21 February 2017 / Accepted: 8 March 2017 / Published: 11 March 2017
PDF Full-text (200 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A primary factor limiting the expansion of many Kansas garden centers is marketing. Most of these businesses spend the majority of advertising dollars on traditional media (newspaper, radio, etc.). However, new-media tools such as social-media can be an effective method for developing profitable
[...] Read more.
A primary factor limiting the expansion of many Kansas garden centers is marketing. Most of these businesses spend the majority of advertising dollars on traditional media (newspaper, radio, etc.). However, new-media tools such as social-media can be an effective method for developing profitable relationships with customers. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions and experiences of garden center stakeholders as they use new-media to market their businesses. Grunig’s Excellency Theory served as the theoretical framework for this study. Results indicate garden center operators prefer to use traditional media channels to market to their customers and asynchronously communicate with their target audiences. Stakeholders often have inaccurate or conflicting views of traditional media and new-media in regard to advertising and tend to approach new-media marketing from a public information or asynchronous viewpoint. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
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