Next Article in Journal
Compatibility of Ten Elite Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) Clones
Next Article in Special Issue
Assessing Purchase Patterns of Price Conscious Consumers
Previous Article in Journal
Growth and Tissue Elemental Composition Response of Butterhead Lettuce (Lactuca sativa, cv. Flandria) to Hydroponic and Aquaponic Conditions
Previous Article in Special Issue
Horticultural Loss Generated by Wholesalers: A Case Study of the Canning Vale Fruit and Vegetable Markets in Western Australia
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Horticulturae 2017, 3(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae3030044

Quantifying Postharvest Loss and the Implication of Market-Based Decisions: A Case Study of Two Commercial Domestic Tomato Supply Chains in Queensland, Australia

Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, DC 4558, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 8 July 2017 / Revised: 23 July 2017 / Accepted: 1 August 2017 / Published: 5 August 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marketing Strategies of Horticultural Production Chain)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [954 KB, uploaded 7 August 2017]   |  

Abstract

Abstract: Using a multi-disciplinary approach, this study quantifies horticultural postharvest losses of two medium-sized (annual pack volume 4500 t) commercial, domestic, tomato supply chains. Quantification of loss was based on weight or volume, consistent with direct measurement methods of the Food Loss and Waste Accounting and Reporting Standard 2016 and qualitative techniques were used to identify the drivers of the loss and contextualise the findings. Postharvest loss was found to be between 40.3% (55.34 t) and 55.9% (29.61 t) of the total harvestable product. It was determined that between 68.6% and 86.7% of undamaged, edible, harvested tomatoes were rejected as outgrades and consequently discarded due to product specifications. Between 71.2% and 84.1% of produced tomatoes were left in the field and not harvested. This study highlights significant factors contributing to high levels of food loss and waste. Edible products are being removed from the commercial food supply chain, rejected as outgrades deemed cosmetically defective due to market-based decisions. With only 44.1% and 59.7% of the harvestable crop reaching the consumers of the two supply chains, respectively, it is perhaps more appropriate to describe a food “waste” chain as opposed to a food “supply” chain. View Full-Text
Keywords: Keywords: food security; horticulture; tomato; postharvest loss; food loss and waste; private food policy and standards; destination of loss Keywords: food security; horticulture; tomato; postharvest loss; food loss and waste; private food policy and standards; destination of loss
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

McKenzie, T.J.; Singh-Peterson, L.; Underhill, S.J.R. Quantifying Postharvest Loss and the Implication of Market-Based Decisions: A Case Study of Two Commercial Domestic Tomato Supply Chains in Queensland, Australia. Horticulturae 2017, 3, 44.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Horticulturae EISSN 2311-7524 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top