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Beverages, Volume 1, Issue 1 (March 2015), Pages 1-33

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Beverages: A Requirement for Life and an Opportunity to Impact the Way We Live It
Beverages 2015, 1(1), 1-2; doi:10.3390/beverages1010001
Received: 17 May 2014 / Accepted: 20 May 2014 / Published: 26 May 2014
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Abstract
Imagine a product that is used everyday by everyone around the world. In fact, imagine a product that must be used multiple times a day by everyone. That product is a beverage. Without beverages we cannot live. Many health practitioners recommend that
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Imagine a product that is used everyday by everyone around the world. In fact, imagine a product that must be used multiple times a day by everyone. That product is a beverage. Without beverages we cannot live. Many health practitioners recommend that adults consume approximately 2 liters of liquid daily and most of that consumption comes from beverages. Those beverages range from water to alcoholic beverages, soft drinks to coffee, tea to juice, and milk to so-called energy drinks or functional beverages. This enormous variety and consumption of beverages provides an unlimited opportunity to study product development and manufacturing, human consumption behavior, physical health and happiness, sensory impacts, public policy and a host of other important topics.[...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle Consumer Evaluation of Processing Variants of Pomegranate Juice
Beverages 2015, 1(1), 3-16; doi:10.3390/beverages1010003
Received: 10 September 2014 / Accepted: 20 October 2014 / Published: 3 November 2014
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Abstract
Increasing evidence of their health benefits has boosted the popularity of pomegranates. The effects of processing (e.g., pasteurization, drying) on pomegranate juice characteristics (e.g., color, phenolic content) and sensory attributes have been studied by several authors. The objectives of this study were to
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Increasing evidence of their health benefits has boosted the popularity of pomegranates. The effects of processing (e.g., pasteurization, drying) on pomegranate juice characteristics (e.g., color, phenolic content) and sensory attributes have been studied by several authors. The objectives of this study were to (1) understand if processing, such as pasteurization or drying, has an effect on pomegranate juice acceptance, and (2) if acceptance is related to healthy eating habits or variety seeking tendencies. Arils were removed from fresh Wonderful pomegranates for juicing or drying. Four treatments were prepared: fresh, fresh frozen, pasteurized, and reconstituted juice from dried arils. Fresh frozen, pasteurized, and reconstituted juices were evaluated by consumers for acceptance. Cluster analysis was conducted and four consumer clusters were found from evaluation of these juice treatments. Each juice was individually disliked by one of three clusters, demonstrating the effect of processing on acceptance. The fourth and largest cluster liked all three treatments. In addition, the consumers were asked to fill in Stage of Change and Variety Seeking scales. Liking scores were not found to be highly associated with healthy eating habits or variety seeking tendencies. This information is beneficial for the fruit processing industry, showing that processing can influence consumer acceptance. Full article
Open AccessArticle Effects of Albedo Addition on Pomegranate Juice Physicochemical, Volatile and Chemical Markers
Beverages 2015, 1(1), 17-33; doi:10.3390/beverages1010017
Received: 1 December 2014 / Revised: 14 January 2015 / Accepted: 27 January 2015 / Published: 3 February 2015
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Abstract
Five commercial juices, representing the five clusters of this juice, were characterized before and after maceration with 10% pomegranate albedo (control- and albedo treated (AT)-juices, respectively). Commercial juices were macerated with albedo homogenate for 24 h, and then the albedo was removed. Total
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Five commercial juices, representing the five clusters of this juice, were characterized before and after maceration with 10% pomegranate albedo (control- and albedo treated (AT)-juices, respectively). Commercial juices were macerated with albedo homogenate for 24 h, and then the albedo was removed. Total soluble solids, titratable acidity, maturity index (MI), total phenolic content (TPC), volatile composition, and flavor profile were evaluate in control- and AT-juices. From all physico-chemical characteristics, only the TPC was significantly affected by the treatment and ranged from 846 to 3784 mg gallic acid L−1 and from 2163 to 5072 mg gallic acid L−1 in control- and AT-juices, respectively; the increment in TPC was more than 1.3-fold in all AT-juices. No clear pattern was found when studying the volatile composition; only significant increases were observed in the contents of hexanal, 2-hexenal, and 3-hexenal in all AT-samples. The flavor profile study indicated that three of the five samples increased their bitterness and/or astringency. In addition, new attributes, which were not present in the control juices, appeared after maceration with albedo in some samples: green-bean, brown-sweet, and green-viney. This information will be useful in developing and promoting new “healthy” products based on pomegranate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fruit Beverages: Nutritional Composition and Health Benefits)

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