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Foods 2012, 1(1), 52-65; doi:10.3390/foods1010052
Article

Carotenoids from Foods of Plant, Animal and Marine Origin: An Efficient HPLC-DAD Separation Method

1,* , 2
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3
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3
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1 Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Technology, School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechniou 5, Zografou 15780, Athens, Greece 2 Instrumental Food Analysis Laboratory, Department of Food Technology, Technological Educational Institution of Athens, Ag. Spyridonos 12210 Egaleo, Greece 3 Food Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Athens, Panepistimioupolis Zographou 15701, Athens, Greece
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 1 November 2012 / Revised: 7 December 2012 / Accepted: 14 December 2012 / Published: 19 December 2012
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Abstract

Carotenoids are important antioxidant compounds, present in many foods of plant, animal and marine origin. The aim of the present study was to describe the carotenoid composition of tomato waste, prawn muscle and cephalothorax and avian (duck and goose) egg yolks through the use of a modified gradient elution HPLC method with a C30 reversed-phase column for the efficient separation and analysis of carotenoids and their cis-isomers. Elution time was reduced from 60 to 45 min without affecting the separation efficiency. All-trans lycopene predominated in tomato waste, followed by all-trans-β-carotene, 13-cis-lutein and all-trans lutein, while minor amounts of 9-cis-lutein, 13-cis-β-carotene and 9-cis-β-carotene were also detected. Considering the above findings, tomato waste is confirmed to be an excellent source of recovering carotenoids, especially all-trans lycopene, for commercial use. Xanthophylls were the major carotenoids of avian egg yolks, all-trans lutein and all-trans zeaxanthin in duck and goose egg yolk, respectively. In the Penaeus kerathurus prawn, several carotenoids (zeaxanthin, all-trans-lutein, canthaxanthin, cryptoxanthin, optical and geometrical astaxanthin isomers) were identified in considerable amounts by the same method. A major advantage of this HPLC method was the efficient separation of carotenoids and their cis-isomers, originating from a wide range of matrices.
Keywords: carotenoids; HPLC; photodiode array detection; tomato waste; Penaeus kerathurus; avian egg yolks carotenoids; HPLC; photodiode array detection; tomato waste; Penaeus kerathurus; avian egg yolks
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Strati, I.F.; Sinanoglou, V.J.; Kora, L.; Miniadis-Meimaroglou, S.; Oreopoulou, V. Carotenoids from Foods of Plant, Animal and Marine Origin: An Efficient HPLC-DAD Separation Method. Foods 2012, 1, 52-65.

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