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Chemosensors, Volume 3, Issue 1 (March 2015), Pages 1-35

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Chemosensors in 2014
Chemosensors 2015, 3(1), 21; doi:10.3390/chemosensors3010021
Received: 13 January 2015 / Accepted: 13 January 2015 / Published: 13 January 2015
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Abstract
The editors of Chemosensors would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2014:[...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for the Determination of Anthraquinone Hair Dyes in Wastewaters
Chemosensors 2015, 3(1), 22-35; doi:10.3390/chemosensors3010022
Received: 8 December 2014 / Revised: 10 February 2015 / Accepted: 11 February 2015 / Published: 16 March 2015
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The present work describes the development of a voltammetric sensor for the selective determination of Acid Green 25 (AG25) hair dye, widely used in commercial temporary hair dyes. The method is based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes activated
[...] Read more.
The present work describes the development of a voltammetric sensor for the selective determination of Acid Green 25 (AG25) hair dye, widely used in commercial temporary hair dyes. The method is based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with multiwalled carbon nanotubes activated in the presence of sulfuric acid, where the anthraquinone group present as a chromophore in the dye molecule is reduced at −0.44 V vs. Ag/AgCl in a reversible process involving two electrons in Britton-Robinson (B-R) buffer solution at pH 4.0. Analytical curves were obtained using square wave voltammetry in the range from 1.0 × 10−7 to 7.0 × 10−6 mol·L−1, achieving a detection limit of 2.7 × 10−9 mol·L−1. The voltammograms recorded for the Acid Black 1 (AB1) dye showed that the azo groups of the dye were reduced on the carbon nanotube-modified electrode (CNTME), presenting a pair of redox peaks at −0.27 V and −0.24 V in the reverse scan. Under these experimental conditions, both dyes could be detected in the water sample, since the AG25 dye is reduced at −0.47 V. The presence of other hair dyes bearing other chromophore groups, such as Acid Black 1, Acid Red 33 and basic blue 99, did not interfere with the method, which showed an average recovery of 96.7 ± 3.5% (n = 5) for AG25 dye determination in the presence of all of these dyes. The method was successfully applied to tap water and wastewater samples collected from a water treatment plant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Electrochemical Sensors for Environmental and Food Analysis)

Review

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Open AccessReview First Fifty Years of Chemoresistive Gas Sensors
Chemosensors 2015, 3(1), 1-20; doi:10.3390/chemosensors3010001
Received: 4 March 2014 / Accepted: 11 December 2014 / Published: 5 January 2015
Cited by 44 | PDF Full-text (1052 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The first fifty years of chemoresistive sensors for gas detection are here reviewed, focusing on the main scientific and technological innovations that have occurred in the field over the course of these years. A look at advances made in fundamental and applied research
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The first fifty years of chemoresistive sensors for gas detection are here reviewed, focusing on the main scientific and technological innovations that have occurred in the field over the course of these years. A look at advances made in fundamental and applied research and leading to the development of actual high performance chemoresistive devices is presented. The approaches devoted to the synthesis of novel semiconducting materials with unprecedented nanostructure and gas-sensing properties have been also presented. Perspectives on new technologies and future applications of chemoresistive gas sensors have also been highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Solid State Gas Sensors)

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