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Coatings, Volume 3, Issue 2 (June 2013), Pages 59-125

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Research

Open AccessArticle Computational Tools and Approaches for Design and Control of Coating and Composite Color, Appearance, and Electromagnetic Signature
Coatings 2013, 3(2), 59-81; doi:10.3390/coatings3020059
Received: 27 November 2012 / Revised: 10 February 2013 / Accepted: 3 April 2013 / Published: 11 April 2013
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Abstract
The transport behavior of electromagnetic radiation through a polymeric coating or composite is the basis for the material color, appearance, and overall electromagnetic signature. As multifunctional materials become more advanced and next generation in-service applications become more demanding, a need for predictive [...] Read more.
The transport behavior of electromagnetic radiation through a polymeric coating or composite is the basis for the material color, appearance, and overall electromagnetic signature. As multifunctional materials become more advanced and next generation in-service applications become more demanding, a need for predictive design of electromagnetic signature is desired. This paper presents various components developed and used in a computational suite for the study and design of electromagnetic radiation transport properties in polymeric coatings and composites. Focus is given to the treatment of the forward or direct scattering problem on surfaces and in bulk matrices of polymeric materials. The suite consists of surface and bulk light scattering simulation modules that may be coupled together to produce a multiscale model for predicting the electromagnetic signature of various material systems. Geometric optics ray tracing is used to predict surface scattering behavior of realistically rough surfaces, while a coupled ray tracing-finite element approach is used to predict bulk scattering behavior of material matrices consisting of microscale and nanoscale fillers, pigments, fibers, air voids, and other inclusions. Extension of the suite to color change and appearance metamerism is addressed, as well as the differences between discrete versus statistical material modeling. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Multifunctional Coatings for Next Generation Applications)
Open AccessArticle Ethylene Methacrylic Acid (EMAA) Single Splat Morphology
Coatings 2013, 3(2), 82-97; doi:10.3390/coatings3020082
Received: 9 April 2013 / Revised: 3 June 2013 / Accepted: 4 June 2013 / Published: 14 June 2013
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Abstract
A single splat is the building block of a thermal spray coating; thus, investigating single splats is essential to understanding thermal spray coatings and their properties. In this study, the morphology of flame sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) splats, deposited at various [...] Read more.
A single splat is the building block of a thermal spray coating; thus, investigating single splats is essential to understanding thermal spray coatings and their properties. In this study, the morphology of flame sprayed ethylene methacrylic acid (EMAA) splats, deposited at various stand-off distances (SODs) onto glass and mild steel substrates were investigated using a scanning electron microscope, Leica M Stereo-microscope, the WYKO surface profiler and the ContourGT surface profiler. This work analyzed the effect of the process variables on EMAA splat morphology. The modeling of the temperature versus velocity (TV) map, the temperature versus stand-off distance (TS) map and the velocity versus stand-off distance (VS) map of EMAA single splat were presented. Full article
Open AccessArticle Uniform and Robust Peptoid Microsphere Coatings
Coatings 2013, 3(2), 98-107; doi:10.3390/coatings3020098
Received: 21 May 2013 / Revised: 13 June 2013 / Accepted: 14 June 2013 / Published: 21 June 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (4191 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Peptoids that are helical and partially water soluble have been shown to self-assemble into microspheres when the peptoid solution is dried on a silicon substrate. Such microsphere coatings have great potential for use in biosensor technologies, specifically to increase the surface area [...] Read more.
Peptoids that are helical and partially water soluble have been shown to self-assemble into microspheres when the peptoid solution is dried on a silicon substrate. Such microsphere coatings have great potential for use in biosensor technologies, specifically to increase the surface area for binding. However, in order to be useful, the peptoids must consistently form uniform coatings. In this study we investigated the effects of various coating protocol parameters on the uniformity of the resulting peptoid microsphere coatings, including (i) solvent, (ii) administration technique, and (iii) drying environment. In addition, we investigated the robustness of the coatings as well as the potential for using a glass substrate. These studies show that uniform, robust peptoid microsphere coatings can be formed using protic solvents, a full coverage administration technique, and drying in open air on silicon or glass substrates. Full article
Open AccessArticle The Influence of Interface Characteristics on the Adhesion/Cohesion of Plasma Sprayed Tungsten Coatings
Coatings 2013, 3(2), 108-125; doi:10.3390/coatings3020108
Received: 3 May 2013 / Revised: 5 June 2013 / Accepted: 14 June 2013 / Published: 21 June 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (5543 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tungsten is the prime candidate material for plasma facing components of future fusion devices. Plasma spraying, with its ability to coat large areas, including non-planar surfaces, with a significant thickness, is a prospective fabrication technology for components subject to moderate heat loads, [...] Read more.
Tungsten is the prime candidate material for plasma facing components of future fusion devices. Plasma spraying, with its ability to coat large areas, including non-planar surfaces, with a significant thickness, is a prospective fabrication technology for components subject to moderate heat loads, e.g., the first wall of the Demonstration Reactor (DEMO). The functionality of such coatings is critically dependent on their adhesion to the underlying material. This in turn, is influenced by a variety of processing-related factors, chief among them being the state of the interface. In this study, the effects of two factors—surface roughness and the presence of thin interlayers—were investigated. Two different levels of roughness of steel substrates were induced by grit blasting, and two thin interlayers—titanium (Ti) and tungsten (W)—were applied by physical vapor deposition prior to plasma spraying of W by a Water Stabilized Plasma (WSP) torch. Coating adhesion was determined by a shear adhesion test. The structures of the coatings and the interfaces, as well as the characteristics of the fractured surfaces, were observed by SEM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High Temperature Coatings)

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