Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

J. Intell., Volume 5, Issue 4 (December 2017)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle Measuring Reasoning about Teaching for Graduate Admissions in Psychology and Related Disciplines
J. Intell. 2017, 5(4), 34; doi:10.3390/jintelligence5040034
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 5 October 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 7 November 2017
PDF Full-text (251 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Teaching- and teaching-evaluation skills are critically important to professional success in psychology and related disciplines. We explored the possibility of measuring reasoning-about-teaching skills as a supplementary measure for admissions in psychology and related behavioral-sciences disciplines. We tested 103 students for their reasoning about
[...] Read more.
Teaching- and teaching-evaluation skills are critically important to professional success in psychology and related disciplines. We explored the possibility of measuring reasoning-about-teaching skills as a supplementary measure for admissions in psychology and related behavioral-sciences disciplines. We tested 103 students for their reasoning about teaching and their reasoning about research, as well as for their cognitive- (abstract reasoning) and educational skills. We found that women performed better than men on our reasoning-about-teaching measure, and that factorially, our reasoning-about-teaching measure clustered with our reasoning-about-research measures but not with our measures of abstract cognitive reasoning and educational skills. Full article
Open AccessArticle Intelligence and Sensory Sensitivity as Predictors of Emotion Recognition Ability
J. Intell. 2017, 5(4), 35; doi:10.3390/jintelligence5040035
Received: 29 September 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 6 November 2017 / Published: 8 November 2017
PDF Full-text (287 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The ability to recognize emotions from nonverbal cues (emotion recognition ability, ERA) is a core component of emotional intelligence, which has recently been conceptualized as a second-stratum factor of intelligence (MacCann et al., 2014). However, only few studies have empirically investigated the link
[...] Read more.
The ability to recognize emotions from nonverbal cues (emotion recognition ability, ERA) is a core component of emotional intelligence, which has recently been conceptualized as a second-stratum factor of intelligence (MacCann et al., 2014). However, only few studies have empirically investigated the link between ERA, intelligence, and other mental abilities. The present study examined the associations between ERA, fluid intelligence, and sensory sensitivity in a sample of 214 participants. Results showed that both fluid intelligence and sensory sensitivity explained unique portions of variance in ERA. These findings suggest that future studies on ERA should include intelligence measures to assess the incremental validity of ERA above and beyond intelligence. Full article
Open AccessArticle Working Memory Training for Schoolchildren Improves Working Memory, with No Transfer Effects on Intelligence
J. Intell. 2017, 5(4), 36; doi:10.3390/jintelligence5040036
Received: 3 October 2017 / Revised: 24 November 2017 / Accepted: 5 December 2017 / Published: 13 December 2017
PDF Full-text (568 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Working memory contributes to many higher-order cognitive processes and predicts general cognitive skills. It is therefore important to know if its functions are trainable. In this study we investigated the malleability of working memory processes in schoolchildren whose cognitive functions are still developing.
[...] Read more.
Working memory contributes to many higher-order cognitive processes and predicts general cognitive skills. It is therefore important to know if its functions are trainable. In this study we investigated the malleability of working memory processes in schoolchildren whose cognitive functions are still developing. We also analyzed transfer effects to both general and specific intellectual skills. To address these issues, we examined the effectiveness of working memory training (10 training sessions) in terms of practice effects (trained tasks), near-transfer effects (working memory capacity), and far-transfer effects (psychometric intelligence). Sixty-nine children aged 8–10 participated in the study. The experimental group (42 children) participated in working memory training that intensely engaged the updating function of working memory. The training tasks, implemented as computer games, were based on the n-back and keep track paradigms. There was also an active control group (27 children). The results suggest that the experimental group improved their working memory capacity, as measured with both trained and untrained tasks. Regarding intelligence, far-transfer effects were weak and may be attributed to mere repetition of measurements. Moreover, whereas improvement in the training tasks could be observed after 15 months, the far-transfer effects disappeared in the delayed assessment. Full article
Figures

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessBrief Report Maltreatment Related Trauma Symptoms Affect Academic Achievement through Cognitive Functioning: A Preliminary Examination in Japan
J. Intell. 2017, 5(4), 32; doi:10.3390/jintelligence5040032
Received: 4 June 2017 / Revised: 26 August 2017 / Accepted: 15 September 2017 / Published: 21 September 2017
PDF Full-text (744 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Child abuse and neglect could have some deleterious impacts on both intellectual and academic performance of school students. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among child maltreatment, trauma symptoms, cognitive functioning, and academic achievement. Data were collected from child guidance
[...] Read more.
Child abuse and neglect could have some deleterious impacts on both intellectual and academic performance of school students. The aim of this study was to examine relationships among child maltreatment, trauma symptoms, cognitive functioning, and academic achievement. Data were collected from child guidance centers, where maltreated children were substantiated, assessed, evaluated, protected, and treated clinically. The selection criteria for subjects included Japanese children (1) who had a history of maltreatment; (2) whose IQs were measured using the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children second edition (KABC-II); and (3) whose traumatic stress was evaluated using the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children alternate version (TSCC-A). Covariance structure analysis showed the model that explains the relations of trauma symptom (measured by TSCC-A) on academic achievement (measured by KABC-II) as being intervened by cognitive functioning (measured by KABC-II). Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCommentary Overemphasized “g”
J. Intell. 2017, 5(4), 33; doi:10.3390/jintelligence5040033
Received: 29 June 2017 / Revised: 29 August 2017 / Accepted: 26 September 2017 / Published: 1 October 2017
PDF Full-text (253 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper I argue that the emphasis on “g” has become a hindrance to the study of broadly defined human cognitive abilities. Abilities captured by the first- and second-stratum factors in the Cattel-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory have been neglected. The focus has been
[...] Read more.
In this paper I argue that the emphasis on “g” has become a hindrance to the study of broadly defined human cognitive abilities. Abilities captured by the first- and second-stratum factors in the Cattel-Horn-Carroll (CHC) theory have been neglected. The focus has been on a narrow range of cognitive processes that excludes those common to some sensory modalities and a host of new tasks and constructs that have become available through recent conceptual analyses and technological developments. These new areas have emerged from psychology itself (complex problem solving tasks and emotional intelligence) and from disciplines related to psychology like education and economics (economic games and cognitive biases in decision-making). Full article
Back to Top